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http://archive.org/details/citydocuments19251926lowe 



CITY DOCUMENTS 



OF THE 



CITY OF LOWELL 




MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR THE 



YEAR 1926 



EXTRACTS FROM THE ORDINANCES 
OF LOWELL 



CHAPTER VIII — CITY DOCUMENTS 

SECTION 5. All City Documents (except the Rules and 
Regulations for the Government of the Police and Fire De- 
partments) shall be printed in pamphlet form of the size of the 
Annual Report ot the School Committee. 

SECTION 6. All City Documents shall be bound together 
in one volume, under the direction of the City Clerk, and 
three or more copies shall be placed in the City Library, and 
one copy in the Library of the Middlesex Mechanics' Associa- 
tion, one copy shall be sent to each City of the Commonwealth, 
to the Library of the Harvard College, the Public Library of 
Boston, the State Library, the Smithsonian Institute at Wash- 
ington, and the Old Residents' Historical Association of Lowell. 



CONTENTS 



1. One hundredth Annual Report of the School Committee 
of Lowell together with the Sixty-second Annual Report 
of Superintendent of Schools, 1925. 

2. Auditor's Ninetieth Annual Report of the Receipts and 
Expenditures of the City of Lowell, also General Inform- 
ation for the financial year ending Dec. 31, 1925. 

3. Reports of Births, Marriages and Deaths, 1925. 

4. Report of the Board of Health, 1925. 

5. Annual Report of the Fire Department, 1925. 

6. Park Commissioners' Twenty-third Annual Report, ending 
December 31, 1925. 

7. Report of the Trustees of the City Library for 1925. 

8. List of Jurors for the year 1926. 

9. Annual Report of the Police Department, December 
31, 1925. 



Fourth Inaugural Message 



of 



JOHN J. DONOVAN, MAYOR 

LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 

JANUARY FOUR, NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-SIX 





JOHN J. DONOVAN 



Mayor's Fourth Inaugural Message 



Gentlemen of the City Council: — 

Today I present my fourth inaugural address to 
the City Council. I welcome into official life the new 
members of the council, and ask that they accept my 
best wishes for a pleasant and successful service in 
office. Three years ago I too, entered upon an untried 
field of public .service with the same sincere and honest 
purpose to try and render to my fellow citizens a clean 
and capable administration of public affairs. My first 
two years met with approval, and I was re-elected 
The past year has been one of strife and confusion, 
which is inevitable when a civic reform movement is 
inaugurated in any community. Such movements 
should be primarily for the welfare of the city as a 
whole and not for the purpose of bringing before the 
bar of public opinion city officials to be ridiculed and 
lashed with unreasoning wrath and accusation. 

I have hesitated to speak at this time of the 
present situation in our city. Yet, were I to ignore it 
the assumption would be that I was evasive and 
perhaps afraid to discuss frankly with the people of 
Lowell present conditions. For the past eight months 
it has been a one-sided affair. Every kind of suspicion 
and misrepresentation has been directed at your public 
officials. The good in public life has been spoken of in 
a whisper, if at all, while the alleged bad in public 
affairs is proclaimed and broadcast to the world. 
Perhaps it is now time to sober down a bit, and view 
things from the standpoint of justice and fair play. 
Conditions of public life in Lowell today are no worse 
than in past years, only they are made to appear so. 



The average business man can conduct his 
business affairs on his own initiative and judgment. 
If he makes a mistake he is answerable to himself and 
the responsibility is his. The average public official 
does not know often times that he has violated some 
technical provision of the general laws, city charter, 
or ordinances, until a decision of the supreme court 
has been rendered, or he has been haled into court on 
a criminal charge. Yet, his motives and conduct can 
be as well intentioned as that of the business man with 
no greater element of wrong-doing involved. 



A PERSONAL WORD. 

Let me say to my fellow citizens that I do not 
fear the outcome of the charges pending against me. 
I ask for no sympathy in this present hour of general 
accusation, but I do ask and feel that I have a right to 
expect simple justice and fair mindedness from my 
fellow citizens. I ask that they form no definite 
opinion adversely to me upon the one-sided presenta- 
tion of alleged error in my public conduct. 

Perhaps I have not been the ablest and wisest 
administrator who has ever held the office of mayor. 
From the standpoint of brilliancy of speech and 
artfullness in official conduct that is true, but from the 
standpoint of going through office an honest man and 
uninfluenced by improper motives, I am the equal of 
any man who has held the office of mayor since this 
city was incorporated, and I am confident that a jury 
of my fellow men will say so. 

Perhaps when all these troublesome clouds have 
passed away and citizens are permitted to view things 
in a calm and deliberate manner they may come to the 
conclusion that after all we have had "much smoke and 
little fire". 



ble to levy taxable revenue. There is but little 
difference between municipal economics and individual 
economics; the law of averages works about the same 
in both instancs. 



EMERGENCY ORDERS. 

We have heard much in the past eight months 
about the alleged abuse of emergency purchase of 
supplies. Our citizens have been led to believe that it 
is a favorite pastime at City Hall to declare these 
emergencies so as to avoid competitive bidding. It 
may be of interest to know that a total of over seven 
thousand requistions have gone through the purchas- 
ing's office the past year. Yes, let me repeat, over 
seven thousand requisitions and of this number less 
than forty have been emergency requisitions and the 
majority of these emergency requisitions have been 
for hay, grain, coal and fire hose. Is this a terrible 
abuse tof the emergency privilege ? 



LOWELL'S CENTENNIAL 

One of the most important events in the history 
of Lowell is to be celebrated this year, namely: "The 
One Hundredth Anniversary of the Incorporation of 
Lowell as a Town". This celebration, which has 
already assumed great proportions must be a success 
and I now call upon all of our citizens to see that 
nothing be left undone to this end. 

Committees are functioning and plans are being 
made rapidly for the Centennial observance. As time 
goes on these plans will develop and as the scope of 
their operation broaden our citizens will be called upon 
to take a greater and greater interest and activity 
in them. There is the greatest of harmony existing 
in the ranks of the Centennial Workers at the present 
time and I see no reason why this relationship should 



not continue. We all must put aside our political and 
personal feelings and work towards a common end, 
and that end, the success of the Lowell Centennial in 
1926. 



MUNICIPAL GARAGE 

I would- recommend the appointment of a special 
committee of the City Council to consider the advisa- 
bility of perfecting plans for the erection and main- 
tenance of a municipal garage. The great increase in 
the number of motor vehicles for all departments and 
the expense of upkeep and repairs would seem to 
justify an exhaustive study of the proposition. 



A NEW POLICE STATION. 

I recommend that the City Council give serious 
consideraton to the advisability of perfecting plans 
for an up-to-date Central Police Headquarters. There 
can be no denying the fact but what the present head- 
quarters are out of date, are too cramped, have few, 
if any, of the modern police facilities, are dark and 
dingy and in no way do they come up to the require- 
ments desired or expected of them. With the removal 
of the bounty court house to Hurd street this question 
is of immediate serious concern. 



CHARITY DEPARTMENT. 

Much contention has arisen during the past 
year in relation to the Charity Department affairs. 
Criticism and investigation have been directed at this 
department with much severity. A few hours of 
examination of this department with one's eye 
centered on re-action from the standpoint of news- 
paper publicity is not going to solve very substantially 
the problems of the department. 



THE REAL TROUBLE WITH LOWELL 

The administration of a city and state generally 
since the war and as a matter of fact, in the last 20 
years, is no easy proposition. The government 
expenses have increased annually and appear to have 
increased faster than the value of property on which 
taxes are levied, and the result has been a great in- 
crease in the tax rate. Then there has been a great in- 
crease in the expenditures for the mental, cultural and 
hygienic development of the public, which of course is 
a very good thing, but that I think is one thing which 
should be somewhat governed by one's needs, and 
while of course we all desire things to be nice and use- 
ful, we can't always have them just the way we would 
like to have them. The tendency has also been for 
people to demand better quality and a greater quantity 
of public service, all which is very desirable but it 
should be kept within well defined bounds. 

Year after year it is the same old complaint — 
taxes are high. Waste and extravagance dominate 
city expenditures; our city officials are incompetent. 
A hundred and one views are expressed about the 
public service. I venture to suggest after three years 
of service what to my mind is a most essential trouble. 
We demand every modern convenience of up-to-date 
city life. We insist that our streets be well-lighted 
and paved ; that our schools lack not even the most 
modern frill of education; that our parks and play- 
grounds be equipped with modern recreational facili- 
ties; that our public health standards be of the best; 
that public buildings be maintained and new ones built 
as needed. Police and tire protection and service must 
be had. Yes, we demand all the comforts and con- 
veniences of modern city life, and in addition pay our 
proportionate share of state and county expense. 
Some will say that there is too much waste and extra- 
vagance in public expenditures; that we would have 
lower taxes but for this. 



I do not say that wasteful and extravagant 
methods are entirely eliminated in public affairs any 
more now since American government was founded, 
but I do say that there is needless expense imposed 
upon communities by general laws enacted by the state 
legislature, and which is outside the control of local 
government and that there is so much of fixed charges 
in a local budget which must be provided for, for one 
reason or another, but little is left for the element of 
waste and extravagance to come into play. 

The City of Lowell can have a $20 or a $25 tax- 
rate this year if its citizens really want it. We can 
cut down our lighting bill one half and save close to 
$100,000. We can do but little work on our streets and 
save a quarter of a million dollars. We can collect 
ashes and house offal twice a month instead of weekly 
and save $50,000. We can pass up the maintenance 
of parks, playgrounds, health camps; close our 
hospitals and avoid our obligations of charity service. 
We can curtail our school program and save unlimited 
money. In fact in every department of the city we car 
save money. We can save a million dollars at the 
expense of modern city comfort and convenience. You 
gentlemen have responsibility in this matter. 

Let us stop talking about 'waste and extra- 
vagance and high tax rates for a moment and reflect 
upon other lines. True, it will be a unique diversion 
but perhaps a healthy one. We demand modern 
municipal conveniences in every department of public 
service and fail to provide the necessary revenue 
through increased municipal growth in business and 
civic wealth. We complain about high tax rates which 
are inevitable when the municipal wealth of the com- 
munity fails to keep pace with the demands of modern 
city life. 

If our taxes are too high, it is fundamentably 
caused by a too rapid advance along lines of municipal 
luxury and comfort with not enough resources availa- 



A division of the department became effective 
last year. The department is now divided into sub- 
divisions of "Out-Door Relief and Mothers' Aid" and 
"Chelmsford Street Hospital". It is an arrangement 
which I believe will bring about a more efficient 
operaton than before. 

It would be a very good thing if our citizens 
would take enough time to visit the Chelmsford Street 
Hospital and see for themselves the magnitude of the 
work involved in the maintenance of this institution. 
It would be much more impressive than acceptance of 
criticism based upon no more intimate knowledge of 
conditions than is possessed by the average citizen. 
Municipal charity can not be governed altogether by 
any set of hard and fast rules. 



HEALTH CAMP FOR CHILDREN. 

This is a feature of municipal activity that 
should demand from the city government greater 
assistance than in the past. Upon my recommendation 
an appropriation of $5,000 was allowed last year for 
the erection of suitable buildings. These buildings 
will be available for occupancy this year. The Board 
of Health should receive liberal appropriations this 
year to maintain a health camp for children on a much 
larger scale than in the past. Simply bringing children 
to the camp for a few hours a day is a small physical 
benefit. Equipment and appropriation should be 
sufficient to permit children to remain over night, if 
the camp is to be of real permanent service. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC SERVICE. 

Despite agitation directed against this board its 
program of street work has gone on with remarkable 
efficiency and dispatch. In fact when figures are 
available it will be proven that last year was the banner 



year in street work accomplishment. The Board com- 
pleted its program of work laid out at the beginning of 
the year and kept within its appropriation. It must be 
evident to any citizens who wishes to view public work 
impartially that great strides have been made in street 
work under the Board of Public Service the past three 
years. I have confidence in the personnel of the board 
and stand ready to aid them in their constructive 
program of street work. 



FINANCIAL COMMENT. 

From out of the maze of confusion relating to 
our financial condition it will be found when the true 
balance of accounts is reached that our city has kept 
its expenditures within its income. Our tax-rate 
advanced last year and so did the tax rates of many 
other cities of the state. We borrowed less money 
last year than we paid on the city debt. We are in a 
sound and healthy financial condition and are far 
from being headed toward financial chaos as critics of 
the administration would make out to serve political 
ends. 



CONCLUSION. 

Let us approach the new year with confidence 
and courage in our work, and as our best judgment 
points out the way to do things, let them be done that 
way. We will not be immune from criticism and 
abuse; that would be too much to expect, but perhaps 
it may be a little fairer and just this year than the past 
year. In any event it is our obligation to go forward 
with firm resolve and purpose to give our city a 
creditable and decent administration of public affairs. 
This is my pledge to my fellow citizens, regardless of 
the efforts to discredit my public service. 



One Hundredth Annual Report 



OF THE 



OF THE 

CITY OF LOWELL 



AND THE 



OF THE 



1925 




LOWELL, MASS. 



BUCKLAND PTG. CO. 
67 MIDDLE ST., LOWELL, MAS! 



CITY OF LOWELL 



Office of the School Committee, 
Lowell, Mass., March 9, 1926. 

At a meeting of the School Committee, held on this date, it was 
voted to adopt the report of the Superintendent of Schools for 1925 
as the report of the School Committee for that year and to authorize 
the printing of the report. 

In accordance with this vote the report is herewith submitted. 

HUGH J. MOLLOY, 

Secretary. 



ORGANIZATION 

OF THE 

School Committee 1925 



HON. JOHN J. DONOVAN, Mayor, Chairman 
JAMES J. BRUIN, Vice-Chairman 
HUGH J. MOLLOY, Secretary 



MEMBERS 

Term Expires 

JAMES J. BRUIN 1925 

Res. 161 School St. Tel. 3697-R 

Bus. 45 Merrimack St. Tel. 1073 
HON. JOHN J. DONOVAN 1926 

Res. 42 Clare St. Tel. 3016 

Bus. City Hall. Tel. 395 
ARTHUR H. R. GIROUX 1927 

Res. 794 Moody St. Tel. 2953-M 

Bus. 24 Prince St. Tel. 2290 
ALICE F. D. PEARSON 1925 

Res. 69 Clitheroe St. Tel. 2479 
JOHN H. PRESTON 1926 

Res. 19 Bertram St. Tel. 3389-W 

Bus. Whidden St. Tel. 1366 
JAMES H. RILEY 1927 

Res. 39 Methuen St. Tel. 4938-W 

Bus. 53 Central St. Tel. 6772 

EDWARD J. ROGERS 1926 

Res. 1036 Central St. Tel 5591-M 
Bus. 66 Central St. 

REGULAR MEETINGS OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



January 27 


May 26 


September 29 


February 24 


June 30 


October 27 


March 31 


July 28 


November 24 


April 28 


August 25 


December 29 



4 ORGANIZATION OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1925 

ADMINISTRATION 

Superintendent of Public Schools 

HUGH J. MOLLOY 

Office in City Hall 

Office Tel. 2728 Home Tel. 3121 

Office Hours — One hour after the forenoon sessions of the schools ; 

at other times, including Saturdays, by appointment. 



Clerks 

FANNIE A. THOMPSON 

Home Tel. 1066 

KATHARINE L. CARMICHAEL 



Business Agent 



HENRY L. WILLIAMS 
Office Tel. 2727 Home Tel. 2714 



Clerk in Business Agent's Office 

LEDA C. LAMONTAGNE 
Office in School Suppfy Room, City Hall 



Stock-keeper 

FREDERICK JOHNSTON 

Office hours for Supply Room 

8 a. m. to 5 p. m. 



Supervisor of Janitors 

WILLIAM F. THORNTON 
Office Tel. 3960 Home Tel. 



Attendance Officers 

Wm. F. Thornton, Camille Roussin, George F. Lee, Mary H. Downey 



Clerk in Attendance Office 

STELLA G. MOLONEY 

Office— Third Floor, City Hall 

Office Hours — 9 to 4 o'clock daily, except Saturday; 

Saturday, 9 to 12.30 o'clock. 



ORGANIZATION 

OF THE 

School Committee 1926 



HON. JOHN J. DONOVAN, Mayor, Chairman 
EDWARD J. ROGERS, Vice-Chairman 
HUGH J. MOLLOY, Secretary 



MEMBERS 



Term Expires 

HON. JOHN J. DONOVAN . . . .' 1926 

Res. 42 Clare St. Tel. 3016 

Bus. City Hall. Tel. 395 

ARTHUR H. R. GIROUX 1927 

Res. 794 Moody St. Tel. 6258-M 

Bus. 24 Prince St. Tel. 2290 
PAUL L. HARRIS, M. D 1928 

Res. 50 Fay St. Tel. 7389 
ALICE F. D. PEARSON 1928 

Res. 69 Clitheroe St. Tel. 2479 
JOHN H. PRESTON 1926 

Res. 19 Bertram St. Tel. 3389- W 

Bus. Whidden St. Tel. 1366 
JAMES H. RILEY 1927 

Res. 39 Methuen St. Tel. 4938- W 

Bus. 53 Central St. Tel. 6772 

EDWARD J. ROGERS 1926 

Res. 1036 Central St. Tel 5591-M 
Bus. 66 Central St. 

REGULAR MEETINGS OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



January 26 


May 25 


September 28 


February 23 


June 29 


October 26 


March 30 


July 27 


November 30 


April 27 


August 31 


December 28 



6 ORGANIZATION OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1926 

ADMINISTRATION 

Superintendent of Public Schools 

HUGH J. MOLLOY 

Office in City Hall 

Office Tel. 2728 Home Tel. 3121 

Office Hours — One hour after the forenoon sessions of the schools 

at other times, including Saturdays, by appointment. 



Clerks 

FANNIE A. THOMPSON 

Home Tel. 1066 

KATHARINE L. CARMICHAEL 



Business Agent 

HENRY L. WILLIAMS 

Office Tel. 2727 Home Tel. 2714 



Clerk in Business Agent's Office 

LEDA C. LAMONTAGNE 
Office in School Supply Room, City Hall 



Stock-keeper 

FREDERICK JOHNSTON 

Office hours for Supply Room 

8 a. m. to 5 p. m. 



Supervisor of Janitors 

WILLIAM F. THORNTON 
Office Tel. 3960 Home Tel. 8484 



Attendance Officers 

Wm. F. Thornton, Camilla Roussin, George F. Lee, Mary H. Downey 



Clerk in Attendance Office 

STELLA G. MOLONEY 

Office— Third Floor, City Hall 

Office Hours — 9 to 4 o'clock daily, except Saturday; 

Saturday, 9 to 12.30 o'clock. 



REPORT OF THE 

Superintendent of Schools 



Office of the Superintendent of Schools. 
Lowell, Mass., March 9, 1926. 

To the School Committee of Lowell : 

The following report, for the year 1925, is respectfully submitted. 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS 

Valuation of City $145,404,663.00 

Valuation of school property 4,620,440.00 

Rate of taxation, $31.80 per $1000 

Expenditures for Day Schools 1,301,545.14 

Expenditures for Evening Schools and Americanization.. 32,049.00 

Day School expenditures to total valuation 895 per cent 

Day and Evening school expenditures to total valuation. .917 per cent 

Population by census of May 1925 112,759 

Number of polls 30,639 

Number of Public Day Schools 73 

One high ; five junior high ; thirteen grammar ; thirty-one 
primary; four mixed; eighteen kindergartens and one 
continuation. 

Number of school buildings 50 

Occupied by public schools 48; occupied by vocational 

schools, 2. 
Elected teachers, December 31; on leave 4; in service, 
527; total 531. 

Permanent Substitutes 20 

Subdivisions of elected teachers in service : 
High, 34 men ; 73 women ; Junior High, 8 men, 93 
women; Grammar, 5 men, 121 women; Primary, 111 
women ; Mixed, 14 women ; Kindergarten, 33 women ; 
Continuation, 5 men, 6 women ; Drawing, 3 women ; 
Music, 1 man, 2 women ; Sewing, 5 women ; Supervisor 
of Primary Grades, 1 woman ; Director of Fire and 
Accident Prevention in the Elementary Schools, 1 
man; Physical Instructors in Elementary Schools, 5 
men, 3 women ; Supervisor of Writing in Primary 
Schools, 1 woman; Instructor of High School Military 
Band, 1 man; High School Military Instructor, 1 man. 
Teachers in Evening Schools counting principals, term of 

1924-25 68 



8 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

Pupils Enrolled, in Evening Schools, term of 1924-25 

High, 1369 ; Elementary, 648 2,017 

Whole number of pupils enrolled in Day Schools, 1924-25 
High, 2648; Junior High, 2665; Grammar, 4811; 
Primary, 5074; Mixed, 517; Kindergarten, 793 16,508 

Average number belonging to Day Schools, 1924-25 
High.. 2439; Junior High, 2405; Grammar, 4020; 
Primary, 4148, Mixed, 448 ; Kindergarten, 571 14,031 

Average number belonging to Day Schools for year ending 
December, 1925 : 

High, 2516; Junior High, 2468; Grammar, 4005; 
Primary, 4087; Mixed, 504; Kindergarten, 632 14,212 

Average attendance, 1924-25 : 

High, 2291; Junior High, 2284; Grammar, 3800; 

Primary, 3847; Mixed, 415; Kindergarten, 493 13,130 

Average per cent of attendance, 1924-25 : 

High, 93.9; Junior High, 94.9; Grammar, 94.5; Primary, 

92.7; Mixed, 92.6; Kindergarten, 86.3. 
Average membership for year ending December, 1925 : 

High, 2555 ; Junior High, 2506 ; Grammar, 3906 ; 

Primary, 4084; Mixed, 495 ; Kindergarten, 642 14,188 

Number of school rooms in actual use in June, 1925 : 

High, 75; Junior High, 71; Grammar, 110; Primary, 

114 ; Mixed, 12 ; Kindergarten, 18 400 

Number of school rooms in actual use in December, 1925 : 
High, 79 ; Junior High, 73 ; Grammar, 111 ; Primary, 119 ; 
Mixed, 14; Kindergarten, 18 411 

Average number to each room for year ending June, 1925 : 

High, 32; Junior High, 34; Grammar, 36; Primary 36; 

Mixed, 37; Kindergarten, 31. 
Average number to each room for year ending December, 

1925: 

High, 30 ; Junior High, 32 ; Grammar, 36 ; Primary, 34 ; 

Mixed, 32; Kindergarten, 31. 
Average cost of each pupil for tuition only, based on 

average number belonging : 

High, 85.85; Junior High, 85.95; Grammar, 56.54; 

Primary and Mixed, 47.70 ; Kindergarten, 69.12. 
Average cost per pupil based on the average rfumber 

belonging and on the total expenditures for tuition, 

janitor service, supervision, supplies, fuel and all 

incidentals 89.54 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 



Boys: Buildings, 1; rooms, 16; teachers, 17; pupils 
enrolled, 272; average number belonging, 196; average 
number attending, 181 ; per cent of attendance, 91.8. 

Girls: Buildings, 1; rooms, 9; teachers, 12; pupils 
enrolled, 138; average number belonging,112; average 
number attending, 100; per cent of attendance, 89. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

E xpendi tures 

Appropriated and Assessed in 1925 • $1,433,824.89 

Smith Hughes Fund 9,667.02 

Amount Disbursed 1,433.491.91 

Teachers of Day Schools : 

High School 213,822.19 

Junior High Schools— Bartlett $ 54,478.28 

Butler 37,688.79 

Moody 16,013.32 

Morey 54,804.59 

Varnum 32,595.72 

$ 195,580.70 

Grammar Schools Bartlett $ 12,242.05 

Butler 10,492.00 

Colburn 16,376.00 

Edson 18,571.63 

Green 22,773.47 

Grelenhalge 22,187.32 

Lincoln 23,177.63 

Moody 8,141.12 

Morey 19,176.14 

Pawtucket 19,792.34 

Riverside 10,038.63 

Varnum 9,128.81 

Washington 12,469.90 

$ 204,567.04 

Primary and Mixed Schools $ 201,195.88 

Kindergartens 43,089.88 

Special Teachers 45,466.61 

Substitutes 13,841.00 

Total paid for instruction in Day Schools $ 917,562.87 



10 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

Summer Schools $ 5,259.00 

Janitors : 

Janitors of Day Schools 132,360.01 

Pensions .;...' 942.00 

Repairers of Furniture 3,600.00 

Electricians 4,157.50 

Firemen 10,565.63 

Evening Schools : 

Teachers, High and Elementary Schools.. 21,285.50 

' Janitors '. . 5,192.00 

$ 183,361.64 

Continuation School 22,294.14 

Smith Hughes 1,796.01 

Americanization : 

Teachers 4,845.50 

Janitors 726.00 

$ 5,571.50 

Cost of Supervision : 

Superintendent of Schools $ 6,000.00 

Office Assistants 3,065.33 

Business Agent 3,300.00 

Stock-keeper , 1,800.00 

Clerk in Supply Room 1,400.00 

Attendance Officers (four) 9,600.00 

Clerk in Attendance Office 1,400.00 

Chauffeur and General Labor 1,750.00 

Packer 145.00 

$ 28,455.33 

Vocational School Teachers and Janitors 91,471.77 

Total Salaries, Vocational Schools omitted 1,159,041.49 

Total Salaries, Vocational Schools included 1,255,513.26 

Expended for Bills for the Year 1925 

Coal $ 42,967.93 

Wood 701.50 

Water 5,609.40 

Board of Truants 1,178.28 

Electricity 10,002.44 

Gas 3,653.22 

General Repairs 6,398.24 

Furniture 2,796.05 

Books .' 25,421.12 

Paper and Supplies 16,539.02 

Printing 3,877.87 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

Manual Training 2,382.87 

Janitor Supplies 6,687.93 

Apparatus 544.51 

Medical Supplies 74.25 

Cooking, etc 6,128.64 

Material for Sewing 475.75 

Autos 4,469.26 

Graduation 378.69 

Regiment 2,838.05 

Telephones 1,601.15 

Transportation 3,161 .17 

Miscellaneous 543.96 

Appropriation Transfers : 10,932.53 

Continuation 1,862.39 

Physical Training 3,371.07 

Sight Saving 70.19 

Expense of School Committee 2,356.14 

Typewriters 2,072.08 

Rents 280.00 

Americanization 29.00 

Kindergartens 831.81 

Summer Schools 419.28 

Musical Instruments 498.11 

School Survey 259.60 



Total $174,552.95 

Bills, Vocational School . . . 18,425.70 

Total of Bills, Vocational Schools included 192,978.65 

Salaries and Bills, Vocational Schools omitted 1,333,594.44 

Salaries and Bills, Vocational Schools included 1,443,491.91 



Analysis of Vocational School Expense 

Salaries of Daj r Teachers $55,779.43 

Janitors of Day Schools 5,250.00 

Salaries of Evening School Teachers 18,511.83 

Janitors of Evening Schools 4,059.50 

Smith Hughes Fund 7,871.01 

Total of Salaries $91,471.77 

Equipment and Supplies 18,425.70 



Total Expenditures for Vocational School $ 109,897.47 



12 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

Receipts 

The receipts by the general treasury on account of the school 

department during the year were as follows : 

Vocational School : 

Smith Hughes Fund $ 9,667.02 

Reimbursement 52,617.37 

Tuition 11,750.24 

Continuation School : 

Reimbursement 13,677.06 

General : 

Tuition 13,464.24 

Massachusetts School Fund 95,496.79 

Americanization 6,836.89 

Sight Saving Class 500.00 

Total 204,009.61 

Expenditures by Public Property Department 69,060.25 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 
(Discussion) 

The total amount expended in 1925 was $1,443,491.91 ; 
the amount for the year 1924 was $1,374 ; 351.42. The increase 
for the year was $69,140.49. 

The large items of increase during the year are as 
follows : High School Salaries, $13,410.75 ; Junior High 
and Grammar Salaries, $22,333.15; Primary and Mixed 
School Salaries, $6,605.41; Kindergarten Salaries, $1,180.82; 
Janitors, $3,312.32; Firemen, $3,811.53; Vocational School 
Teachers and Janitors, $4,951.69; Bills, $11,322.95. 

The per capita cost for tuition alone in 1924 and 1925 
were as follows in the different grades of schools : 

1924 1925 

High $87.68 $85.85 

Junior High 79.60 85.95 

Grammar 56.87 56.54 

Primary and Mixed 44.81 47.70 

Kindergarten 72.41 69.12 

The city received on account of the school department 
various sums listed on page 12 ; which total $204,009.61 ; 
therefore the net expenditure by the School Committee for 
the year 1925 was $1,239,482.30. 

The item of reimbursement from the Massachusetts 
School Fund is made up from an allowance of $200 for every 
teacher's salary which is not less than $950, under conditions 
set forth in the law. 



14 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

SCHOOL CENSUS 

The following data were obtained from the census of 
1925 :— 

Males Females Total 

(a) Five years of age or over and under seven 1736 1754 3490 

(b) Seven years of age or over and under sixteen 6979 7603 14582 

(c) Fourteen years of age or over and under 

sixteen 1580 2076 3656 



10295 11433 21728 

Certain passages from the statutes which apply to school 
attendance are here quoted for the information of the general 
public : 

CHAPTER 76. 
"SECTION 1. (As amended by chapter 463, Acts of 1921.) Every 
child between seven and fourteen, every child under sixteen who does 
not meet the requirements for the completion of the sixth grade of the 
public schools of the town where he resides, and every child under 
sixteen except a child holding an employment certificate as provided 
in chapter one hundred and forty-nine and employed in some regular 
employment or business for at least six hours per day, and except a 
child having the written permission of the superintendent of schools 
of the town where he resides to engage in profitable employment at 
home, shall, subject to section fifteen, attend a public day school in 
said town or some other day school approved by the school committee, 
during the entire time the public schools are in session, unless the 
child attends school in another town, during the entire time + he same 
is in session, under sections six to twelve, inclusive, or under chapter 
seventy-one ; but such attendance shall not be required of a child 
whose physical or mental condition is such as to render attendance 
inexpedient or impracticable, or who is being otherwise instructed in 
a manner approved in advance by the superintendent or the school 
committee. The superintendent, or teachers in so far as authorized 
by him or by the school committee, may excuse cases of necessary 
absence for other causes not exceeding seven day sessions or four- 
teen half day sessions in any period of six months. For the purposes 
of this section, school committees shall approve a private school only 
when the instruction in all the studies required by law is in English, 
and when satisfied that such instruction equals in thoroughness and 
efficiency, and in the progress made therein, that in the public schools 
in the same town ; but they shall not withold such approval on 
account of religious teaching. , 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 15 

The school committee of each town shall provide for and enforce 
the school attendance of all children actually residing- therein in 
accordance herewith. 

SECTION 2. Every person in control of a child described in the 
preceding section shall cause him to attend school as therein required, 
and, if he fails so to do for seven day sessions or fourteen half 
day sessions within any period of six months, he shall, on complaint 
by an attendance officer, be punished by a fine of not more than 
twenty dollars. No physical or mental condition capable of correction, 
or rendering the child a fit subject for special instruction at public 
charge in institutions other than public day schools, shall avail as a 
defence unless it appears that the defendant has employed all 
reasonable measures for correction of the condition and the suitable 
instruction of the child. 

SECTION 3. Every illiterate minor between sixteen and twenty- 
one except a married woman, shall attend some public evening school, 
if any, in the town of his residence, for the whole time during which 
the public evening schools are in session, unless he attends a public 
day school, or a private school approved as provided in section one 
by the school committee, or unless his physical or mental condition 
is such as to render his attendance harmful or impracticable. Wilful 
violation of this section by such a minor shall be punished by a fine 
of not less than five dollars ; failure for six sessions within a period 
of one month by any person in control of such a minor to cause his 
attendance, shall, on complaint by an attendance officer, be punished 
by a fine of not more than twenty dollars. 

SECTION 4. Whoever induces or attempts to induce a minor to 
absent himself unlawfully from school, or unlawfully emploA'S him or 
harbors a minor who, while school is in session, is absent unlawfully 
therefrom, shall be punished by a fine of not more than fifty dollars." 

Although the age limits for compulsory school attendance in 
Massachusetts are 7 and 14 years most towns and cities admit children 
to kindergarten and primary schools at lesser ages than the one 
specified in the statutes. In Lowell a child may enter the kindergarten 
school at the age of 4 years and 3 months ; a child may enter the first 
primary grade at 5 years and 6 months, with this exception, however, 
that a child who has attended kindergarten school for one year may be 
accepted in the first primary grade at 5 years and 3 months. 

These ages are certainly low enough and reasonable enough and 
parents should not persistently strive to have exceptions to the rules 
made for their children. 



16 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

SCHOOL HOUSES 

Early in the year the School Committee voted to employ 
Professor L. O. Cummings of the Harvard School of Educa- 
tion to make a survey of school housing conditions with a 
view to recommending some plan for the steady and gradual 
development and improvement of school accomodations. 

The high school has not as yet been used to its full 
capacity, but it is to be remembered that the retention in the 
Junior High organizations of many who, under the old 
arrangement of grades, would be members of the high school 
freshman class has virtually enlarged the capacity of the 
high school. 

The larger school centres, such as the Butler, Morey, 
Bartlett and Varnum, could make good use of somewhat 
larger accomodations as certain school activities are hardly 
up to modern standards. 

We should have, also, in several sections, rooms which 
might be used for special classes and for various forms of 
work which would meet the needs of many children better 
than ordinary classes meet them. 

No thoughtful person would, at the present time, recom- 
mend much in the way of enlargement but, nevertheless, a 
reasonably steady improvement and development of housing 
conditions would seem to be consistent with prudence and 
good judgment. 

RESIGNATIONS, RETIREMENTS AND ELECTIONS 

Resigned 

Edith Erskine Blaney High School 

Minnie Pihl Carter Elementary 

Louise McKenna Cawley High School 

Regina Frappier Cornellier Elementary 

Mildred McNa K b White Elementary 

Retired 

Kate G. Jones Elementary 

Helen Kohawn Elementary 

Lizzie A. Nolan Elementary 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



17 



Elected 



Martina L. Boyle 
Rose L. Brown 
William J. Brown 
Genevieve A. Callahan 
Alice G. Carey 
Mary H. Casey 
Doris Childs 
Lillian Chisholm 
Marion Condon 
Alfred S. Gagnon 
Margaret L. Hagerty 
Mary E. Haggerty 
Rose Harrington 
C. Ethel Hale 
Katherine Hey 
Katherine T. Higgins 
Evelyn G. Hyde 
Christine Kane 
Katherine F. Kearney 
Margaret M. Kelly 
Mary J. Lane 
Grace Lawler 
Mary E. Lennon 
Eleanor G. Lybrand 
Ellen E. McEvoy 
Eleanor McPadden 
Agnes W. Maher 
Loretta Mahoney 
Clara Marchacos 
Edwin S. Markham 
Edith T. Miles 
Llelen Mulcahy 
Anna S. Mulligan 
Mary A. Murphy 
Marietta O'Donnell 
William J. O'Brien 
Dana Palmer 
Louise E. Pollard 
Marjorie P. Pratt 
Francis Quinn 
Mary E. Quinn 
Gertrude Regan 
Louis Renaud 
Anna M. Ryan 
Ruth C. Sheldon 
Daniel F. Sullivan, Jr. 
Mary C. Sullivan 
Mary X. Sullivan 
Marguerite Tellier 
Gladys Tucker 
Helen G. Walker 
Grace F. Ward 
Theresa L. White 
Catherine L. Wrenu 



Elementary 

Elementary 

High School 

Elementary 

Elementary 

Elementary 

Kindergarten Principal 

Vocational 

Kindergarten 

Janitor 

Primary Principal 

Clerk, Evening Vocational 

Elementary 

High School 

Elementary 

Elementary 

Elementary 

High School 

Elementary 

Elementary 

Elementary 

Elementary 

Elementary 

Junior High Schools 

Elementary 

Kindergarten 

High School 

High School 

Elementary 

High School 

Elementary 

High School 

Elementary 

Elementary 

Elementary 

High School 

High School 

Elementary 

Elementary 

Janitor 

Janitress 

Kindergarten 

Janitor 

High School 

Elementary 

Janitor 

Elementary 

Elementary 

Elementary 

Elementary 

High School 

Principal — Franklin Bldg. 

Kindergarten Principal 

Elementary 



18 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



IN MEMORIAM 

AGNES C. ALLEN 
Principal of the Washington Kindergarten 

MABEL W. EWINGS 
Teacher in the Lincoln School 

MARGARET HARRAHAN 
Teacher in the Charles Street School 

KATE J. HAYES 
Teacher in the Edson School 

DR. EDWIN A. KENT 
School Dentist 

ALICE R. KEESE 
Teacher in the Var'num School 

SARA LAPORTE 
Teacher in the Evening Lligh School 

ELIZABETH R. MAGUIRE 
Principal of the London Street School 

GERTRUDE RODLIFF 
Teacher in the Hisfh School 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 19 

PUPILS BY GRADES 
The following table shows the number of pupils in the 
schools according to grades : 

AT ales 

Kindergarten 322 

Grade 1 " 843 

Grade 2 796 

Grade 3 612 

Grade 4 665 

Grade 5 674 

Grade 6 648 

Grade 7 515 

Grade 8 402 

Grade 9 26 

Grade 9 306 

Grade 9 ■. . . . 246 

Grade 10 441 

Grade 11 354 

Grade 12 191 

Grade 13 31 

Specials 81 

Total 7153 7000 14153 

HIGH SCHOOL 

The High School graduated a class of 565 in June and 
there was an entering class of 802 in the September previous. 
Of this class 470 were from the public schools, 237 from 
private schools, 71 from towns which have certificate 
privileges, 5 entered by examination and 19 came from out- 
of-town schools. Of the class of 802, 305 entered with 
advanced standing. 

Ninety-five percent of those certified by the grammar 
schools actually entered the High School ; the average age of 
the entering class was 15 years. 

The graduating exercises were held in the Memorial 

Auditorium on June 24; the names of the Carney Medal 

students and the names of the students who were awarded 
honorable mention are here gfiven: 



nales 


Total 


310 


632 


833 


1676 


736 


1532 


599 


1211 


677 


1342 


576 


1250 


594 


1242 


522 


1037 


445 


847 


32 


58 


325 


631 


213 


• 459 


428 


869 


362 


716 


267 


458 


22 


53 


59 


140 



20 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



Eunice Cook 

Elizabeth Forrest Lambert 

Mary Agnes Brown 



CARNEY MEDAL STUDENTS 

Gordon Ryerson Williams 
Artemas James Stewart 
Elmore Don Lundgren 



HONORABLE 
Eunice Cook 

Elizabeth Forrest Lambert 
Mary Agnes Brown 



MENTION FOR SCHOLARSHIP 
Harriet May Evirs 
Edna Mary Fielding 
Mary Lillian Honan 



Marjorie Eleanore Root 
Kathleen Gertrude Delarev 



Gordon Ryerson Williams 
Artemas James Stewart 



HONORABLE MENTION FOR ATTENDANCE 
Four Years : Lucinda Agnes Leibold 

Three Years : 
Edith May Burke 
Kathleen Veracunda Collins 
Minnie Attrude Chase 
Edna Mary Fielding 
Mary Eileen Hassett 
Alice Irene Houle 



Josephine Agnieszka Kiszka 
Mary Lawler 

Catherine Veronica O'Connor 
Donald James Irvin 
Thaddeus Paul Kokoska 
Horace William Myers 



Francis Henry Sloan 

AMERICAN HISTORY MEDAL 
Elizabeth Doris Carey 



MEDICAL AND DENTAL SUPERVISION 



DIRECTOR OF SCHOOL HYGIENE— Francis A. Finnegan, M. D. 

Nurse, Miss Dwyer — High School, Continuation School and Vocational 
School for Girls — Drs. E. Y. Slaughter and F.'A. Finnegsn. 

Nurse, Miss Craig — Washington, Morey, Pine Street, Colburn Grammar 
and Primary Schools — Drs. E. O. Tabor and C. M. Roughan. 

Nurse, Miss O'Dwyer — Varnum, West Sixth Street, Tenth Street, 
Lakeview Avenue, Moody, Pond Street, High Street, Sycamore- 
Street and Greenhalge Schools — Drs. G. O. Lavallee and C. M 
Roughan. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



21 



Nurse, Miss Lettrell — Eliot, Lincoln, Laura E. Lee, Powell Street, 

Howard Street, Grand Street, Edson, Central Street, Butler, Lyon 

Street, Carter Street, Weed Street, London Street, West London 

Street, Ames Street and Charles Street — Drs. J. F. Boyle and W. E 

Devine. 
Nurse, Miss Frazier — Bartlett, Pawtucket, Lexington Avenue, Middlesex 

Village Schools — Dr. C. S. Baker. 
Nurse, Miss Fox — Green, Cabot Street, Cross Street, Dover Street 

Kirk Street, Worthen Street and Morrill Schools- — Drs. J. J. 

Cassidy and E. M. Slaughter. 
Nurse, Miss Fitzpatrick — Greek Orthodox, St. Michael's, St. Patrick's 

Boys' and Girls' and Boys' Vocational — Drs. H. B. Plunkett and 

C. M. Roughan. 
Nurse, Miss Leclair — St. Joseph's Boys' and Girls' and Ste. Jeanne 

d'Arc— Dr. R. Mignault. 
Nurse, Miss Douglass — Immaculate Conception, St. Peter's and Sacred 

Heart— Dr. F. P. Murphy. 
Nurse, Miss Morrier — St. Louis', St. Marie's and Riverside — Drs. C. M. 

Roughan and R. Mignault. 

The dental clinic is in the Worthen Street School, located 
on Worthen Street between Market and Broadway. The 
room is open on all school days, including days when the 
storm signal is sounded, from nine until twelve in the fore- 
noon, and service is free for any child from any school, public 
or private, for whom an appointment has been made : appoint- 
ments are made by school physicians, nurses, teachers and 
Miss Lantaerne, the dentist's assistant. 



SIGHT 


AND 


HEARING 


Pupils Defective 


Per Cent D< 


Examined 


Sight 


Defective H 


High 2555 


152 


.059 


Junior High 2541 


272 


.107 


Grammar 3965 


518 


.13 


Primary . 4603 


363 


.078 



TESTS 



Defective Per Cent Parents 
Hearing Defective Notified 

14 .005 164 

34 .013 266 

73 .018 545 

72 .015 344 



22 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



SCHOOL SAVINGS BANKS 

The school savings account is printed below: 

Deposits Deposits 

Dec. 31, 1924 Dec. 31, 1925 

Bartlett $2,199.91 $1,945.98 

Edson 1,831.67 1,907.03 

Charles W. Morey 2,000.60 1,853.11 

Varnum 1,261.21 915.66 

$7,293.39 $6,621.78 



VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 

The fifteenth year of the school opened with an enroll- 
ment of two hundred and seventy-two boys and one hundred 
and thirty-eight girls. The only requirement for admission 
to the day classes of the Vocational School as far as age is 
concerned is that a pupil must be not less than fourteen and 
not more than twenty-five years of age. 

All pupils must be residents of the state ; for pupils who 
do not reside in Lowell there is a tuition charge of $225.00 
for boys and $195.00 for girls, payable by the city or town of 
the non-resident pupil, regardless of his place of residence. 

The work is so arranged that a boy may enter at any 
time and advance as rapidly as his industry and ability will 
allow. 

The school offers preliminary training for boys as carpen- 
ters, electricians, cabinet-makers, machinists, and automobile 
repairers. 

The boys are trained mostly on productive work in all 
departments and the work is of such a practical nature that 
they fit naturally into the industry in advanced apprenticeship 
standing. 

All the courses are planned for three years, seven hours 
a day, five days a week. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 23 

The courses are divided into three phases consisting of 
about one year's work in each. Upon the satisfactory comple- 
tion of any phase a certificate is given. 

If a boy gets three certificates and works at the trade for 
which the school has trained him, he is entitled to a diploma. 
A satisfactory fourth year in school also entitles him to a 
diploma. 

The courses have been run on a weekly schedule as 
follows : Shop Science, one-half day ; Academics, one day ; 
Mechanical Drawing, one-half day; Physical Exercises, two 
hours, the time taken as far as possible from the time allotted 
to related work ; the remaining two and one-half days are 
spent on practical work in the shops. 

As the school was filled to capacity the use of two addi- 
tional rooms at the Worthen Street school had to be con- 
tinued. 

The equipment is as follows : 

Machine Shop : — 

5 milling machines, 1 universal, 3 shapers, 3 drills, 2 p'aners, 2 
power saws, 1 grinder, 25 engine lathes, 2 speed lathes, and other small 
tools and accessories. 

Electrical Shop : — 

7 direct current motors, from 1 to 10 HP, 4-3 phase generators, 2 
motor generators sets, 1 rotary converter, 9 to 3^>, 1 Tungar Rectifier, 
1 metal shear, 1 winding head, 3-2 KW. transformers, measuring instru- 
ments and small tools. 

Carpentry and Cabinet-Making Shop : — 

1 buzz planer, 1 cylinder planer, 1 combination and 1 single saw 
bench, 1 band saw, 1 turning lathe, 26 sets of carpenter tools, benches 
and auxiliary tools for carpenters and sets of hand tools for the 
cabinet makers. 

Automobile Department : — 

1 Oakland, 1 Ford car (rebuilt), 1 Maxwell car, 1 Studebaker run- 
about, 1 Lenox touring car, 1 Moon chassis, 1 Essex touring car, 1 
N. E. Motor generator, 5 auto engines for instruction purposes, 3 
starting and lighting systems, Ford-Delco, North Easters, 1 N. E. 
D3 r namotor, 2 battery chargers, 1 battery steamer, wrenches, pliers, 



24 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

jacks, etc., for general repairs, 1 storage voltmeter, 1 electric testing 
instrument. 



GIRLS' DEPARTMENT 

High School Annex, Paige and John Streets 

(Free to all girls living in Massachusetts) 

The school aims to prepare the girls of Lowell and sur- 
rounding towns for life's activities and duties; to give them 
a training in the branches of knowledge and the trades that 
are most useful in the home and gaining a livelihood. 

It is recognized that every girl preparing through any 
kind of an education for life will have more or less to do with 
a home, with the chances largely in favor of her having at 
some time the entire care of a home; and upon the proper 
management of the home depends much of the happiness 
and successs of our commuity. Hence a training in home 
economy should be part of every girl's education. 

To meet these requirements the Vocational School offers 
two-year courses in housekeeping, dressmaking and power 
machine work. In addition the school teaches academic 
subects which are related to the practical work in a way that 
makes their value fully appreciated. Millinery is taken up in 
season during the second year. 

Physical exercises, under direction, is an attraction of 
the junior and senior years. 

Dressmaking — This course is planned to fit a girl for the 
dressmaking trade. It includes plain sewing, dressmaking, 
power machine work and mending. 

Mending: 

Patching. 

Darning. 

Mending of straight and hedge tears. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 25 

Millinery : 

Fall and Spring Renovating. 

Making of velvet, straw and lace hats. 

Trimming. 

Flower Making. 

Housekeeping — The housekeeping course includes every- 
thing that makes and keeps a house in good condition to live 
in. It teaches the buyer to get one hundred cents' worth out 
of every dollar spentj for food and clothes. It includes 
cooking, household management, laundry work, table service, 
marketing and home nursing. 

Cooking : 

Economy and management of the kitchen. 

Plain cooking. 

Food values. 

Simple menus. 

Serving. 

Marketing. 

Practical application in the home. 

Note : — Repetition develops responsibility and assurance in the 
cooking and serving of meals. This practical experience is gained in 
the lunch room of the State Normal School, now under the manage- 
ment of the Vocational School. 

Laundry Courses — Includes practice in removal of stains, 
washing and ironing all articles of clothing and of household 
linens. 

Household Engineering : 

Efficient Household Arrangement. 
Plans and methods for Daily Housework. 
Choice and care of Household Tools. 

Home Nursing : 

Care of a bedroom. 

Care of a patient. 

Bandaging. 

First Aids. 

Care of the Baby. 



26 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

Arithmetic in Relation to : 
Dressmaking. 
Personal expenditure. 
Household. 
Business. 

English : 

Correction and improvement of every-day speech. 
Personal and business correspondence. 
Cultivation of a taste for reading. 

Civics : 

Government of Communities. 
Current events. 
Local interests. 
Club conduct. 

Household Science: 

The Physics and Chemistry of the Household. 

Textiles : 

Study of the Fabrics. 
Name. 
Cost. 

Durability. 
Uses. 
Tests. 

Design: 

Art as applied to a woman's clothing. 
Color. 
Line. 
Fabric. 

Appropriateness. 

Care of the Home : 
Furnishing. 
Decorating. 
Sanitation. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 27 

GIRLS' LUNCH DEPARTMENT 

In February, 1916, the girls' school opened the dining 
room at the State Normal School and since then has served 
dinners and luncheons to the. faculty and students of the 
school. This gives a valuable training in preparing food in 
large quantities and also in serving; the practice proved 
to be so valuable it seemed wise to make it a permanent part 
of the curriculum. 

The school sent out a class of 34 graduates on June 23, 
1925. 

Home project work is a feature of the Vocational School 
programme. By assignment the girls carry out at home 
many projects as a result of the instruction received in 
school. Much of the home project work is supervised. In 
this way the school assures itself that its instruction is func- 
tioning. Both the school and home have found the teachers' 
visits helpful. 

The State Board of Education exercises a considerable 
control over the school, as the state agreed to pay one-half 
of the maintenance expense of the school. In order to secure 
reimbursement from the state, the course of study, equipment, 
buildings and the work of the teachers must be approved 
bv the as'ents of the State Board of Education. 



EVENING VOCATIONAL SCHOOL FOR MEN 

These courses are trade extension and are open only to 
men employed in that line of work during the day and who 
are sixteen years of age or over. 

The school opens early in October and each class meets 
two evenings a week, two hours an evening, for twenty weeks. 

The following courses were offered : 

Course No. Belonging 

Machinist 48 

Auto Repair 61 

Cabinet-Making 18 

Carpentry and Steel Sq 43 

Plumbing 46 

Electrical Theory 28 

Firemen and Engineers 50 

Blue Print Reading 

Sheet Metal Drafting 14 



28 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

Definite courses have been laid out and a system of 
records devised so that each man's progress and accomplish- 
ment can be kept. 

Certificates are given to those whose attendance and 
ranks are satisfactory. On the certificates are the number 
of evenings attended and the kind of instruction completed. 



EVENING PRACTICAL ARTS CLASSES FOR WOMEN 

The occupations of the household in which evening 
instruction has been offered are cooking, dressmaking, 
millinery, embroidery, home nursing and child welfare. 

All types of women have taken advantage of these 
classes. The enrollment includes the busy housewife and 
mother, the young married woman lacking practical home 
experience,' the engaged girl, the business woman and the 
non-English speaking woman. 

The work is conducted on the plan of the short unit 
course. A short unit course is a series of lessons on one 
phase of a particular subject — quick breads in cooking; 
velvet hats in millinery ; sport skirts in dressmaking, etc. 
In general the succession of units follows the progressive 
plan. Class members pass from unit to unit in a continuous 
series or drop out at the end of a unit, their places being taken 
by other^pupils. This is possible because each unit course is 
an entity — each process step is covered by itself without 
regard to what comes before or after as in a consecutive 
course of study. 

The true aim of practical art classes for women should 
be realized perhaps most fully in teaching cooking The 
subject is taught in such a way as to give actual ability to 
cook under home conditions. 

Unit Courses in First Year Cookery for Year 1924-1925: — 

Breads and Fruits — six lessons ; Pastry and Scalloped Dishes — 
five lessons ; Cake and Vegetables — five lessons ; Chafing Dish Suppers 
— four lessons ; Breakfasts — four lessons ; Suppers — ten lessons ; 
Invalid Cookery — four lessons ; Dinners — seven lessons. 

At the request of a group of housekeepers an afternoon 
class in cookery was opened. This class operated one after- 
noon a week for a three and one-half hour session. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 29 



Unit Courses in Second Year Cookery for Year 1924-1925: — 

Sunday Night Suppers — ten lessons ; Tea accompaniments and 
Thanksgiving Dinner — five lessons ; Bread and Desserts and Christmas 
Lunch' — five lessons: Company Meals — nine lessons; Picnic Lunches 
— five lessons ; Sunday Dinners and Alenus for Special Occasions — 
fifteen lessons. 

Unit Courses in First Year Dressmaking for Year 1924-1925:-— 

Simple Dress — twelve lessons ; Costume Slip — eight lessons 

Over-blouse — ten lessons ; Muslin or Crepe Dress — -fourteen lessons. 

Unit Courses in Second Year Dressmaking for Year 1924-1925: — 

Remodeling — sixteen lessons ; Jersey or Flannel Dress — fifteen 
lessons ; Silk Dress — sixteen lessons. 

Unit Courses in Millinery for Year 1924-1925: — 

Fall Hat — eight lessons ; Velvet Hat — ten lessons ; Retween- 
seasons Hat — eight lessons ; Straw Braid Hat — eight lessons ; Horse- 
hair Hat — ten lessons. 

Unit Courses in Embroidery for Year 1924-1925: — 

Embroidery stitches — twelve lessons ; Christmas Novelties — 
seven lessons ; Colored Embroidery — twelve lessons ; Italian Punch 
Work — eleven lessons. 

Course in Home Nursing: — 

The Red Cross Standard Course (16 two hour sessions) is given 
and the Red Cross Certificate is awarded at the successful completion 
of the course. 

The graduate nurses in charge of home nursing have been pre- 
paring to teach First Aid classes. The school expects to offer courses 
in first aid during 1925-1926. 

The woman who has completed the work of a practical 
art class should be able to continue her work independently. 
The purpose of the work is defeated if the aim is merely 
production. 

A record of the accomplishment of each pupil is kept on 
unit history cards. 



30 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

For the vea.r 1924-1925 the number of women enrolled in 
the Evening Practical Arts classes was 1952, distributed as 
follows: — Cooking, 617; Dressmaking, 655; Millinery, 496; 
Embroidery, 48; Home Nursing, 136. 

Fifty-four non-residents attended these classes and 
Lowell Ireceived tuition from several of the surrounding 
towns for their attendance. 

Classes were in session for twenty-five weeks and the 
percent of attendance was 91. 

Sixty teachers were engaged in the work of conducting 
these classes. 

The main centre was the High School Annex:, but classes 
were also carried on at the Butler, Colburn, Edson, Franklin. 
Green, Greenhalge, Lincoln, Moody, Pawtucket, Riverside, 
Varnum and Washington Schools and at the Girls' City Club. 

At the Green School, where Americanization classes were 
conducted with Greek and French girls, a special arrangement 
was made whereby these girls attended academic classes two 
evenings a week and the vocational classes in dressmaking 
and cooking one evening. The contents of the vocational 
courses was adopted to the needs of the girls. 

All instructors of vocational subjects are tradeswomen 
who were prepared for teaching by a course in teacher- 
training conducted under the direction of the Massachusetts 
Department of Education. 

All teachers in service are required to do some approved 
professional improvement work each year. To meet the 
requirement for 1924-25 the instructors of cookery enrolled 
in a course in Household Management under Mrs. Elizabeth 
MacDonald, Head of the department of Household Arts of 
the college of Practical Arts, Boston Unniversity. Miss 
Lillian Phillips of the Boston Normal Art School conducted 
a course in Costume Design with the dressmaking and 
millinery groups. 

These Professional Improvement classes operated during 
May and June at the Girls' Vocational School at the High 
School Annex. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 31 

REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF PRIMARY GRADES, 
KINDERGARTENS AND SCHOOL GARDENS. 

To Mr. Hugh J. Molloy, 
Superintendent of Schools. 

There have been few overcrowded primary schools 
during- the past year. 

This was made possible by the erection of a portable, 
building to relieve the Tenth Street school, the opening of 
another room in. the Kirk Street school, and the transferring 
of pupils. 

I have always advocated small numbers in the primary 
grades, more especially in the first grade. 

The laws of nature make the years spent in these grades 
the more formative, the amount of mental growth greater, 
than in succeeding years. 

It is the time to inculcate good habits, to lay the founda- 
tion of character, to implant high ideals. 

Unless the teacher realizes the importance cf these 
things in the future life of the child, she falls far short of her 
responsibilities as a teacher. 

The teacher cannot accomplish all this and also complete 
the work of her grade in the fundamental subjects required 
in the school curriculum, if she has large numbers. 

With the cooperation which exists between the teachers 
of the kindergarten and primary grades splendid results are 
being obtained. 

The educational principles of the kindergarten and 
elementary schools should be identical. 

Reading 

More emphasis is now being placed on silent reading. 
Many of the latest books are devoted entirely to silent 
reading, even those for the first grades. 

The grade teacher knows that the child must be taught 
the meaning and sound of certain symbols and how to com- 
bine these symbols into phonetic elements and words. The 
ability of the child to recognize words independenrly and 
later, phrases. and sentences, and to give expression to these, 
must precede silent reading. 



32 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

Silent reading is a process by which the child learns to 
interpret the printed page to himself, while oral reading is 
a process in which he interprets it to others. 

In the early grades where recognition of words and 
phrases is slow, where correct pronunciation and enunciation 
are important, oral reading is of first importance. 

When many basal words and phrases have been mastered, 
silent reading should precede oral reading in order that the 
child may interpret simple passages to himself, before giving 
oral expression to them. 

Drill in the primary grades in these lines helps the child 
in rapid silent reading when he has to interpret for himself 
the history, geography and literature of the upper giade text- 
books. 

Much of this work has been done in the past by our best 
primary teachers. The new books which have been placed 
on our approval list of reading books should prove very help- 
ful in future work. 



GARDEN WORK. 

In the death of our Congressman, John Jacob Rogers, 
the school garden children of Lowell lost their best friend 
and school garden work its most loyal champion and promoter. 

An abundant supply of government seeds were sent every 
year by Mr. Rogers, to aid the boys and girls in their garden 
work. 

The letters which were received from him, sewed to 
inspire and encourage our young people in their work. 

In the 1925 school garden club, every child received at 
least one package of seeds from a supply sent by Mr. Rogers 
the previous year, the last seeds to be obtained from govern- 
ment appropriation, the last seeds sent from him. 

It was a tribute to their good friend that these seeds, 
received after his death, should be so appreciated and so 
tenderly planted in home and school gardens. 

The school children of Lowell will long remember John 
Jacob Rogers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALICE T. LEE. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 33 

REPORT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

The extra curriculum atheltic activities of the year have 
been about the same as those previously established. 

Basketball league was won by the Bartlett School. Track 
competition produced the Varnum and Morey Schools as 
champions in the Junior and Senior divisions respectively. 

A new cup presented by the K. of C for total points won 
was accepted. This presentation bespeaks the interest of 
this fraternal body in amateur athletics and clean sportsman- 
ship. This cup is to be the permanent possession of ibe team 
winning it three times and is known as the K. of C. Trophy. 
The first leg in the cup was won by the Morey Scho >\. 

In March of 1925, the Junior High School Relay teams 
were entered in the City Championship Track Meet and the 
A. G. Pollard trophy was won by the Butler School. 

The baseball season opened at the begining of the spring 
term and the league championship was won by the Bartlett 
School. 

Boys' Week parade was held in May and the school boys 
participated under direction of instructors. The track meet 
was also in charge of this department. 

Marble contest sponsored by the Courier-Citizen was 
conducted by the instructors. 

Field Hockey for girls was given a trial and proved that 
girls are very much interested in this sport, but we are handi- 
capped by the lack of suitable playgrounds space near a school. 
School playgrounds such as that adjoining the Lincoln School 
are ideal and give opportunity for the mass to play with 
proper supervision. 

The High School Freshman had a Football Team which 
played a schedule of three games which gave the boys an 
opportunity for competition and for learning the fundamentals 
of this game. 

In reports of previous years mention has been made of the 
unsatisfactory conditions under which we are trying to carry 
on a progressive program of physical education. The con- 
duction of exercises and games between desks in the school 
rooms is a great handicap. The use of assembly halls has 
never been encouraged because of their being on the third 
floor of a building or for the reason that damage might de 
done to walls hangings, lights, etc. The use of these halls 
would give a decided aid to the making of a bigger, better 



34 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

program. 

The Varnum School is the most handicapped school of all. 
There are two portable buildings in the yard which cut down 
play space. Physical classes conducted in the yard are res- 
tricted because of the disrupting effect that play noise has 
upon the remainder of the school. The yard itself is very dan- 
gerous because of the surface conditions. The rocks and 
stones have as much effect in limiting the physical work as 
has the lack of space. 

The assembly hall of this school is large enough but wall 
hangings are endangered. However this could be overcome 
by the use of hanging nets. The lights could be placed against 
the ceiling and caged thereby eliminating the possibility of 
breaking them. 

The Butler School uses a hall in the Carter St. School. This 
hall is an excellent place in which to conduct classes, except 
that in cold weather there is no way of heating it. The result 
is that temperature at times is as low as 45 degress to 50 
degress. Besides being cold it is damp, making an unhealth- 
ful place for classes during winter weather. If heat could 
be gotten to this room and lights put in, the facilities for the 
indoor program of this school would be very favorab'e. This 
school has an adjoining lot which is used and makes an 
acceptable playground, but here also the school yard has not 
the proper surfacing for games. 

The Morey School has a large playground but here again 
the surface is poor. Rocks of all sizes hinder the piay. A 
room about sixty feet by forty feet with six pillars and a 
stage is the gymnasium. Here two classes are conducted at 
the same time. One class is of boys and the other of girls. 
This situation makes it very difficult for instructors to handle 
the classes and also tends to distract the pupils' attention from 
their own subjects. A curtain to divide this room in two and 
the removal of the stage would assist naturally in remedying 
conditions here. 

There are two rooms off this hall which were originally 
intended for shower rooms. It would prove valuable if these 
showers were put in. This could be done perhaps at a small 
cost if individual shower heads were not used. An opportu- 
nity for showers should be provided not only here but in the 
other Junior High Schools. 

The Bartlett School pupils fare better than the others in 
some ways ; they have a small gymnasium. There is a space 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 35 

in the basement (off the basement corridor) about 18x18 feet, 
which is utilized by the girls and occasionally by the boys 
as a class room. This room is too small and its situation 
is far from ideal for a class of any sort. 

There is a great deal of land in the rear of this school 
which should be developed as a playground. At present the 
school makes use of it for baseball practice but development 
for use for other sports would certainly be of benefit. 

The Moody School has very little space for play and 
exercise in its yard and physical education in the hall of this 
building also entails breakages which, however, could be 
lessened by hanging nets. 

To sum up, the use of all our halls is desired. These 
halls should be protected by hanging nets, and the lights 
protected by being placed against the ceiling and encaged. 
Playgrounds should be surfaced so as to minimize danger 
and add more incentive to the spirit of pupils' pla_\. 

Respectively submitted, 

DONALD R. MaclNTYRE. 



ATHLETICS IN THE HIGH SCHOOL 

To Mr. Hugh J. Molloy, 
Superintendent of Schools. 

Athletics have only of recent date been a source of con- 
cern to educators. A generation ago such an activity, as a 
legitimate part of school life, hardly existed. As years passed 
on and adolescents insisted on having their fun through re- 
creative games and interschool contests, the school adminis- 
trator has gradually been compelled to take an interest in 
guiding these activities. With the necessity for control has 
also come the realization that there are important educative 
values in athletics and that these ought to be extended to as 
many boys, and even girls, as possible. The more general the 
participation, the school man believes, the greater the spread 
of education and the more opportunity offered for the build- 
ing of ideals and refining character. 

Such a conception of the function of athletics is not wide- 
ly held by the public at large. Here the one goal is the 
development of strong winning teams which will advertize 
the city and reflect glory on the school. Of course it is not 



36 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

to be implied that the school man does not wish to win in 
the interschool contest. He expects his share of victories ; 
he also desires to provide wholesome recreation and opportu- 
nity for character building for the great mass of students 
who may rightfully expect, in addition to their academic 
education, a certain amount of physical education. Many 
of the private schools have for some time recognized the 
value of this general athletic program and have been able to 
furnish the facilities for its realization. 

Another aspect of the question of high school athletics 
arises as a result of the need of an organization within the 
school to manage and control this new enterprise. Formerly 
the managing of athletic teams was done by students. This 
was to be expected when the players bought their own equip- 
ment, when the games were played in open fields, and when 
little financial responsibilty was involved. Today with high 
school stadia and playing fields costing thousands of dollars, 
with extensive arrangements necessary for important games, 
with the distribution of tickets on the same plan as employed 
by the colleges, with equipment to be purchased and cared for, 
the management and administration of atheletics have 
assumed an unusual importance. With the public demand 
and enthusiasm on the increase, the problems of control be- 
come increasingly complex for an educational institution to 
handle. 

A third question that might well be discussed is the 
method to be used in the future of financing athletics. If 
athletics are of educational value, why should not they be 
financed in the same way that other educational activities 
are financed? Supplies, books, and equipment pertaining to 
the academic life of the school are bought out of tbe school 
appropriation. Why not finance athletics in the same way? 
The profits of the games would under such a plan return to 
the city treasury where they would be available for ordinary 
school expenses. Might they not also be well used to provide 
scholarships for deserving boys? 

The athletic situation in high schools is fraught with 
important educational problems and the school man must do 
some hard and fearless thinking if he is to attempt their 
solution. 

Respecfully submitted , 

JAMES F. CONWAY. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 37 

Mr. Hugh J. Molloy, 

Superintendent of Schools, 
Lowell, Mass. 
Dear Sir: 

The following is my report as Director of Fire and Acci- 
dent Prevention for the year 1925. 

During the year I have given much attention to the 
Grammar and Primary schools as I felt that the younger 
children should receive more attention in the matter of safety 
than the older ones; at the same time I have not overlooked 
the High, Junior High, Vocational and Continuation schools. 
The safety of the children who attend the Kirk Street primary 
school has been one of the problems of the year. 

Fire drills on the whole are uniform and very satisfactory. 
Safety rather than speed has been the watchword for all fire 
drills. I have given much time to" the instruction of teachers 
and pupils in all the details of conducting these drills and of 
marching the children away safely from the fire zone. 

Exposed belts and pulleys, jig saws and planers in the 
schools where they are used have been safeguarded. The 
disposal of waste matter in the schools has been attended to 
but such disposal could be improved in the larger schools by 
the installation of metal boxes with suitable covers and locks. 
Overhanging icicles, snow on the roofs, ice forming in the 
valleys on the roofs, icy steps and sidewalks adjacent to school 
buildings have been watched and cared for. The placing of 
snow guards on some of the very steep roofs and the repairing 
of broken gutters would help in the matter of safety. 

Much good has been accomplished by providing white 
lines at many schools where there is considerable traffic. I 
should like to recommend at this time that the parking of 
automobiles in front of schools during school hours be pro- 
hibited. 

Walking on the railroad tracks to and from school has 
been forbidden and occurs very rarely now. 

I have given much time and effort, even outside school 
hours, to caution children against venturing on thin ice, 
going into deep water unless they are able to swim, coasting 
on the highways, to paying proper attention to railroad cross- 
ings and gates, playing games in the streets, riding bicycles 
on the sidewalks, riding on the handle bars of bicycles, riding 



38 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

bicycles carelessly in the streets, riding on the rear of moving 
vehicles and demanding rides from the drivers of vehicles of 
any kind ; I have also warned children against touching any 
kind of electric wiring, cut-out boxes, or fuse plugs. In at- 
tending to these things I have visited school assemblies and 
class rooms and spoken of the great dangers in using the 
public streets as playgrounds, have also explained the meaning 
of the white and yellow lines in the streets, the meaning of 
the different lights on traffic beacons, and the signals used by 
the traffic officers of the city. 

In all the schools the matter of personal safety has been 
stressed steadil) r by the use of pictures and stories of accidents 
and I have had the full co-operation of all teachers in this 
work, such co-operation being after all the most important 
factor. 

Much personal attention has been given at the schools 
at the time of school assembly and at the time of dismissal, 
boys have been instructed as directors of traffic at their 
schools and have been directed to report the registration 
numbers of drivers of automobiles and trucks who drive 
through lines of school children. 

Liquid fire extinguishers have been kept in good condi- 
tion ; a few more might be distributed to good advantage. 

Attics and cellars are free from combustible material and 
have no exposed live wires ; all exit doors are kept free from 
refuse, as are the stairways and places beneath them. All 
locking devices on exit doors are in fairly good condition, 
stage curtains are in good condition and the permanent stage 
curtains are non-inflammable ; most fire escapes are in good 
condition. Electric wiring and fuse boxes have been regular- 
ly inspected. I should like to see all picket fences capped by 
rails and exit signs near or over doors kept in good condition. 
In a word, very close attention has been given to anything 
and everything which might possibly be an element of danger 
in the schools or on the school premises. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER R. JEYES, 
Director of Fire and Accident Prevention. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 39 

CONTINUATION SCHOOL 

The Lowell Continuation School was established in ac- 
cordance with the state law in September, 1920. 

Experience in administrating" Continuation Schools has 
furnished considerable material wherewith to test the theories 
applied in the establishment of the school. 

The functions this school has intended to perform for 
the group of minors designated by the law are: — (1) to give 
a so-called general improvement education ; (2) To furnish 
through shop experiences and class-room exercises, pre- 
vocational training, which is, in effect, vocational guidance ; 
and (3) To give some definite training for industry. 

General improvement instruction for pupils in our school 
has had important effects. Instruction in civics, personal 
hygiene, regular school subjects, and opportunities for recrea- 
tion have been provided in a less formal way than in the 
regular school. Shop work and subjects related to shop 
work have furnished much valuable experience in fields closely 
related to vocations. 

The Continuation School has had a good influence on the 
attendance of children in; the regular schools and on the 
tendency of those out of employment to return to school. 
Formerly, many children between 14 and 16 were neither in 
school nor at work. Some of them were hunting jobs, but 
the majority were adrift on the streets or idle at home. 

The original plan for the Continuation School emphasized 
follow-up work at the home and the places of employment 
of the pupils. Our experience has justified this policy. The 
time for follow-up work is when the need, is apparent, and 
so the teachers of the Continuation School may be found 
making visits at the homes of their pupils in the evening or 
on Saturday or Sunday. 

By co-operation of home and employer, secured by 
follow-up work, the pupil comes to realize that regularity 
and punctuality are essential to success. The great majority 
of employers favor Continuation School in Lowell. The 
attitude of the employer is largely determined by the supplv 
of and demand for juvenile labor. During a period of depres- 
sion in business employers are often able to secure minors 
over 16 years of age to do work ordinarily periormed by 
boys and girls of 14 to 16 years. 

The Continuation School in Lowell, when established, had 



40 SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

an enrollment of approximately 1100 employed minors bet- 
ween the ages of 14 and 16. Since that time, due to business 
depression, the numbers have varied between 600 and 900 
pupils. 

The genuine interest of the employer in the employee 
is shown by the frequent request for information regarding 
the attendance of the latter in the school. A number of 
employers have stated that the school has assisted their 
employees. Many are of the opinion that there is less shift- 
ing of jobs when pupils attend Continuation School. So far 
as possible the hours of attendance at the school axe those 
most convenient to the employer. 

The size of the class groups gives a good chance for 
individual work in the classes. Pupils come to a teacher for 
two hours work and then go to another teacher for another 
two hours. 

Typical Program for a four-hour period pupil : — 

1st hours — Shop mathematics, hygiene and safety. 
2nd hour — English, spelling and civics. 
3rd hour — Shop. 
4th hour — Shop. 

For the 20-hour pupil or those who are temporarily out of 
employment a more varied program is furnished. 

The problem of securing properly trained teachers for 
the Continuation School is a serious one. For this reason, 
the teaching force employed in this department of school 
work should remain intact, although the number ot pupils 
attending this school varies from time to time. 

The present minimum period of four hours per week is- 
in some particulars a difficult period for business to adjust 
itself to, and this length of time is inadequately either to 
meet the legitimate demands of business or to adequately 
train the pupils who come to our school, so it has been re- 
commended, and we strongly agree that the amount of time 
be extended to half time for a period of not less than 24 
hours in every period of two weeks Or an equivalent of such 
time and that the schools be continuously in session through- 
out the year. 

THOMAS A. GINTY, Director. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 41 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 

The Junior High organization is now city wide and cur- 
riculum adjustments are practically complete. The system 
undoubtedly has some faults, but it has shown many advanta- 
ges, especially to the great mass of pupils that make up the 
non-collegiate group. There is now very little shrinkage in 
numbers between eighth and ninth grades, in som^ cases as 
low as 2% to compare with the old figures of 25%. This 
means that about the entire pupil body that survives as far 
as the eighth grade also goes into the first year of High 
School work. 

Also, they go into this first year of High School with 
more adequate knowledge of their purposes and abilities, 
because these are explained and tried out in the seventh and 
eighth grades, and there is a chance for a change of studies, 
as the interests and abilities of boys and girls show up in the 
two previous grades. The arrangement is a vast improvement 
over the former conditions of a sudden change of studies, 
methods, and school at the close of the Grammar School 
course. By the time the pupil reaches High School he is 
started on a course that he stands a fair chance of continuing, 
and is familiar with the studies and methods. 

Besides sorting out pupils into a variety of groups accord- 
ing to their plans and abilities for future school work, the 
Junior High does more than formerly for the group that 
because of limited ability of finances cannot go further in 
school. Almost every individual has ability in some Erection, 
and the large numbers of pupils in this new organization, 
and the variety of studies make it possible to give such pupils 
a more profitable course. 

As time goes on the teaching becomes much better 
because teachers develop their specialities and can pass on to 
large numbers of pupils the results of their extensive travels 
or research. The schools can also plan a development of 
important adjuncts to education, such as moving pictures, 
orchestras, and various clubs. 

There are weaknesses to correct, and accommodations 
and equipment for many branches of work that are still to be 
secured, but the progress and the present efficiency of the 
Junior High in Lowell are very satisfactory. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



VACATION CLASSES 



Vacation or review classes for children of the upper 
grades in elementary schools have been maintained by the 
Department since the summer of 1922; these classes are held 
for a period of six weeks in the Green School, the length of 
the session being two and a half hours. The classes were 
organized for the benefit of pupils of the upper grades of 
the public schools and for pupils of private schools also who 
might wish to attend them. The work is' of very simple 
character and is designed especially for pupils who need extra 
time and who suffer generally from complete separation from 
their books during the long vacation. 

Vacation classes for High School pupils have been main- 
tained since the summer of 1923, for a term of six weeks, the 
length of the session being two and a half hours. 

There are classes also in sewing and cooking for girls 
and in shop work for boys in connection with the Summer 
playground activities of the Park Department, the work of 
these classes beginning and ending with the playground 
activities. 

EVENING AND MILL CLASSES 

Reference to the school directory and the printed roster 
of schools will show a very extensive organization of classes 
outside the regular day schools of the city. 

Industrial conditions and reduced immigration have had 
the effect of lessening greatly the number in evening and mill 
classes. 

The evening schools have been for a number of years on 
a strictly professional basis. Owing to the large number of 
pupils who se.ek instruction in the High School it has been 
necessary to employ a few teachers who are not members 
of the day school corps, but the teachers are in the main 
regular day scnool teachers. The great demand for evening 
classes in dressmaking, millinery and cooking has called into 
the service many teachers who are not employed in the day 
vocational schools. Evening elementary classes, mill classes 
and Americanization classes are taught exclusively by regular 
day school teachers. 

All vocational, Americanization and mill classes are con- 
ducted as a joint enterprise "by the state and the city; the 
state has a supervisory interest in this work and reimburses 
tne city to the extent of one-half the maintenance cost of the 
classes. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



SUMMARY OF EVENING SCHOOL ATTENDANCE 
FOR TERM OF 1924-25 





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Minors 




m 


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Whole 


Average 






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Number 


Average 


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Registers 


Belonging 


Attendance 


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Write in 




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English 


SCHOOLS 


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High 


41 


41 1 39 


75 


639 | 730 


1369 


359 


439 


798 


302 


374 


676 


85 








Butler : . . 


2 


1 

11 2 


66 


46] 23 


69 


21 


12 


33 


18 


10 


28 


85 


4 




4 


Cabot St 


2 


2 2 


66 


| 36 


36 




27 


27 




23 


23 


88 




4 


4 


Colburn 


4 


S|. 4 


66 


82 20 


102 


40 


16 


56 


35 


15 


50 


90 


1 




1 


Edson 


4 


4 4 


66 


461 12 i 58 


33 


10 


43 


25 


9| 34 


80 


1 




1 


Green 


8 


12 12 


66 


103 ( 177 1 280 


81 


115 


196 


63 


102 


165 


84 


8 


14 


22 


Greenhalge 


4 


31 4 


66 


64 391 103 


36 


27 


63 


28 


22 


50 


80 


18 


17 


35 


Totals 


65 


68 67 


J 9S0J1037 2017 

1 1 1 


570 J 646 1216 


471 


555 


1026 


84 


32 35 


67 



44 



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August .... 
September 
October . . . 
November . 
December 



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SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



SCHEDULE OF SCHOOL SESSSIONS AND VACATIONS 

High School:— 8. IS A. M. to 1.4S P. M. 

Junior High Schools :— 8.30 A. M. to 11.30 A. M. and 1.15 P. M. to 3.4S P. M. 
Elementary Schools :— 8.30 A. M. to 11.30 A. M. and 1.45 P. M. to 3.45 P. M. 
Middlesex Village:— 9 A. M. to 12 M. and 1.30 P. M. to 3.30 P. M. 
Lexington Avenue:— 9.1S A. M. to 12.15 P. M. and 1.15 P. M. to 3.15 P. M. 
Vocational School, Boys':— 8.30 A. M. to 12 M. and 12.30 P. M. to 3.30 P. M. 
Vocational School, Girls':— 8.30 A. M. to 12.30 P. M. and 1 P. M. to 3.30 P. M. 
Evening High School:— 7 P. M. to 9 P. M. 
Evening Vocational Schools:— 7.15 P. M. to 9.15 P .M. 
Evening Elementary Schools:— 7 P. M. to 9 P. M. 



VACATIONS 



Summer Vacations — from the Wednesday preceding the last Friday in June to the 

second week in September. 
The week which includes Christmas. 
The week beginning with the ninth Monday and the week beginning with the eighteenth 

Monday after the Christmas vacation. 
Hours for ringing the no-school signal:— 7.15 A. M., 12.45 P. M., and 6.05 P. M. 
Respectfully submitted, 

HUGH J. MOLLOY, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



46 ROLL OF TEACHERS 



DIRECTORY OF 1926 



Giving name, subjects or grade taught, residence and salaries 



HIGH .SCHOOL 

Kirk and Anne Streets 
Tels. 6870-6871-6872 

Henry H. Harris, Head Master, Administration 93 Eleventh St $4,600 

Frederick R. Woodward, Sub-Master, Head of Math.Dept.24 Sanders Ave 3,500 

James F. Conway, Sub-Master, Chemistry and Athletics. 113 Wentworth Ave. .. 3,400 

Jennie L. Allen, Physics 947 Middlesex St 2,000 

Alice H. Bacheller, American History and English 42 Huntington St 2,000 

Adelaide Baker, Head of French Department 136 Myrtle St 2,100 

Grace L. Barrett, Arithmetic and Junior Business Training77 Mt. Vernon St 1,400 

Orton E. Beach, Secretarial Training, Stenography and 

Head of the Employment Bureau 858 Chelmsford St 2,700 

Ruth J. Boulger, Spanish and Music 74 Wentworth Ave 1,600 

Blanche V. Boyle, Foods 1 41 State St 1,600 

Emma L. Bradley, French 11 Belmont St 2,000 

Elmer G. Brennon, Junior Master, College Mathematics 97 Georgia Ave 3,000 

William J. Brown, Teacher and Assistant Coach 27 South Whipple St. .. 1,700 

C. Fred Campbell, Manual Training 226 Princeton St 2,500 

Marietta Cassidy, Head of the Latin Department 42 Florence Ave 2,100 

Helen E. M. Choate, Geometry and College Mathematics 21 A St 2,000 

James J. Clinton, English 64 Seventh Ave 2,200 

Alice L. Cluin, Latin 29 Belle Ave 2,000 

Martin E. Connors, English 143 Wentworth Ave 2,090 

Elizabeth F. Conway, Arithmetic 248 Chelmsford St 1,500 

Edward B. Cornell, Spanish 88 Durant St 2,500 

Agnes M. Dalton, Clothing 275 Summer St 1,700 

Joseph M. Donoghue, Economics and Accounting 22" Fairfield St 2,090 

Eugene J. Donovan, Geometry and Algebra 809 Lawrence St 2,220 

Grace D. Donovan, English and Modern History 229 Stevens St 2,000 

William A. Donovan, Accounting and Merchandising... 272 Merrimack St 2,090 

Mary A. Dowd, Clothing 220 West Sixth St 1,500 

Susie G. Driscoll, Head of Home Economics Department 

and Foods 40 Burgess St 2,300 

Josephine S. Dunlavy, American History 76 Canton St 2,000 

Almanzor L. Dupuis, French 25 Eighteenth St 2,500 

Ruth L. Eaton, Commercial Law and Office 49 Pine St 2,000 

Mary A. Egan, Stenography and Typewriting 33 Cady St 1,600 

Ethel M. Everett, Ancient History and Algebra 74 Fort Hill Ave 2,000 

Bertha W. Ferguson, Accounting 51 Seventh St 2,000 

Charles D. Foley, Latin and Ancient History 178 Highland Ave 2,220 

Florence R. Foote, Modern History 28 Wannalancit St 2,000 

Anna Gardner, French, Municipal Civics and English. .. 238 Wilder St 1,500 

John J. Gardner, Geometry and Business Mathematics . .795 Bridge St 2,350 

Etnrie E. Gelineau, Manual Training 61 Dracut St 1,960 

John H. Gillick, Geometry 992 Lakeview Ave 2,500 

Grace M. Goodhue, Ancient History, Greek and Roman 120 School St 2,000 

History 

Kenneth N. Goward, Geology, Astronomy, General Science 183 Butman Road .... 1,960 

and Physics 

Peter J. Gulesian, Manual Training Blanchard Av., Billerica. 2,500 

C- Ethel Hale, American History, Botany and Physiology 15 Bobbins St 2,000 

Loretta A. Hannafin, Junior Business Training, BusinesslS Sargent St 2,000 

Mn i-hematics and Commercial Law 

Mary E. Harrigan, Latin and American History ..73 Nesmith St 1,800 

E. Irene Hogan, Hygiene and Office 117 Clark Road 1,800 

Mary E. Hornby, Roman, Medieval and Modern History 41 Madison St 1,400 

Bessie E. Huntoon, French 64 Warwick St 2,000 

Elizabeth Irish, English and Geometry 11 Willow St 2,000 

Mary C. Joyce, Oral Expression 105 Eleventh St 2,250 

Christine M. Kane, English _ 327 Rogers St 2,000 

Mary H. Killpartrick, American History and Commercial 

Geography 31 Westminster St. . . 2,000 

Helen M. Lambert, Chemistry 283 Pawtucket St 2,000 

Bawita Lawler, Physical Education _. 73 Nesmith St 2,000 

Genieve E. Lawrence, Algebra, Botany and English 53 Berkeley Ave 2,000 

Frances R. H. Leggat, Physical Education 137 Wentworth Ave. .. 2,000 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 47 



James P. Liston, Athletic Coach 96 Forth Hill Ave 1,960 

Armabelle C. Lowney, Stenography 86 Sherman St 2,000 

Arthur T. Lynch, Physical Education 87 Fort Hill Ave 1,960 

Albert D. Mack, Junior Master, Accounting 124 Parkview Ave 3,000 

Anna L. Maguire, Oral Expression 12 South Walker St. .. 1,700 

Agnes W. Maher, English 92 Twelfth St 1,400 

Anna L. Mahoney, American History, English and Com- 
mercial Geography 22 Burlington Ave 2,000 

Edwin S. Markham, English 78 Chauncey Ave 1,700 

Mary L. Martin, English and Latin 39 Durant St 2,000 

Frances U. Masterson, German and English 14 Oakland St 2,000 

Joseph A. McAvinnue, Algebra 339 Mammoth Road 2,090 

Elizabeth G. McCarthy, English and Stenography 14 Edson St 1,400 

Henry E. McGowan, Physics and Algebra 36 Varney St 1,700 

Donald R. Mclntyre, Physical Director 242 Wentworth Ave. ..2,500 

Loretto A. McManmon, English and American History .. .Dracut 2,000 

Gladys W. Mevis. Spanish 234 Varnum Ave 2,000 

Ruth E. Monahan,' English and Office West Chelmsford 1,500 

Hannah Estelle Moors, English and American History.. 104 Moore St 2,000 

Helen K. Mulcahy, Typewriting and Commercial Geogra- 
phy 109 Rogers St 1,400 

Ruth B. Munson, Art 117 Branch St 1,600 

Elizabeth H. Murphy, French 159 White St 2,000 

Frances T. O'Brien, English 95 Florence Ave 1,500 

William J. O'Brien, Algebra, Arithmetic and Civics 272 Merrimack St 1,700 

Flora A. Owen, Typewriting 42 Huntington St 2,000 

Esther A. Owens, Latin and French 4 Belmont St 2,000 

Dana Palmer, Spanish and American History 153 Fort Hill Ave 1,706 

Joseph G. Pyne, Tunior Master, Greek and English 8/ Merrill Ave 2,700 

Thomas F. Pyne," Latin and Greek 75 Merrill Ave 1,960 

Julia J. Rafter, English and Commercial Geography . . 282 Foster St 1,400 

Carmen G. Rediker, Commercial Law, Retail Selling and 

Merchandising 282 Appleton St 1,600 

Mary Helene Regan, Foods _ 210 Mammoth Road 1,900 

Anne V. Reynolds, General Science and Physiology 139 Chapel St 1,700 

Lilla R. Robbins, Art W5 Middlesex St 2,000 

Anna M. Ryan, English _ 789 Westford St 1,400 

Marion M. Ryan, Physical Education and Music 40 Sycamore St 1,500 

Hildegarde L. St. Onge, French 99 Walker St 2,000 

Ida L. Samuels. Stenography 52 C'-mvford St 2,000 

Ruth L. Sawyer, Librarian _ 169 Fairmount St 2,000 

Charles E. Seede, Manual Training 26 Fairgrove Ave 2,600 

Millie A. Severance, General Science, News and Short 

Story Writing and English 302 Stevens St 2,000 

James A. Shanley, Accountant 43 Rhodora St 2,500 

J^an C. Shanley, Typewriting and Office Appliance .... 26 Phillips St 1,600 

Margaret V. Spear, French 576 Westford St 2,000 

Mary G. Stevens, English 22 Willow St 2,000 

Alice 0. Stickney, Astronomy, Geology and English . .. . 599 School St 2,000 

Morton, A. Sturtevant, Junior Sub- Master, Head of the 

English Department 77 Harris Ave 2,700 

Mary E. Tobin, Student Adviser 101 Livingston Ave. . . 2,100 

Helen G. Walker, Hygiene 'and Arithmetic 144 Hanks St 1,400 

Susie L. D. Watson, American History 390 East Merrimack St. . 2,000 

Helen M. Whitcomb, English and Municipal Civics 2 Belmont St 2,000 

John J. Giblin, Band Instructor 176 Ennell St 1,000 

Major Colbv T. Kittredge, Military Instructor 141 Cabot St 1,500 

Nathan Pulsifer, M. D., Medical Director 473 Beacon St 200 

Charles E. Thornton, Custodian 295 Appleton St. 

Thomas Harkins, Engineer 76 Hanks St. 

Janitors 

Herbert R. Baker 9 Shedd St. 

Charles J. Burns • 28 Crowley St. 

Patrick J. Clarke 199 Pleasant St. 

Michael H. Finnegan 141 Fayette St. 

John E. Hart 14 Mt. Washington St. 

Mary E. Hassett 23 Hastings St. 

Thomas J. McGee 94 Beacon St. 

Walter S. Mclnerney 51 School St. 

Margaret H. McMeniman 221 High St. 

Michael A. Molloy 1079 Middlesex St. 

Tohn Roark 75 Viola St. 

Elizabeth L. Welch 36 Abbott St. 

Michael J. Wynne 101 Merrill Ave. 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 

BARTLETT SCHOOL 

Wannalancit Street 

Tel. 293 

Charlotte M. Murkland, Principal 179 Pine St $3,350- 

Helene R. Abels, Drawing 43 Nicollet St 1,950 

Sarah E. Ames, History, Civics and Hygiene 12 Warwick St 1,950 

Edith J. Atwood, English and Office 19 Robbins St 1,950 

Delia F. Briscoe, Mathematics and History R. F. D. No. 3, Lowell 1,950 

Anna T. Coburn, Domestic Science 357 Westford St 1,950 

Grace C. Delany, Mathematics 82 Colonial Ave. 1,950 

Alice K. Dinneen, Engiisn 25 Oliver St 1,950 

Kathleen E. Driscoll, Drawing; Geography, Physical 

Work, Vocational Opportunities 47 Grace St 1,950- 

Katherine L. Farley, English R. F. D. No. 3, Lowell 1,950 

George R. Flynn, Manual Arts 59 Monadnock Ave. .. 2,350 

Elizabeth A. Harrington, English _ 75 Huntington St 1,770 

Annnabelle V. Keyes, History, Music, Drawing 59 Thayer St 1,950 

Eleanor J. Lelacheur, French, Sewing, Penmanship and 

Spelling 37 Wannalancit St 1,950 

Teresa G. Lew, Geography and English 89 Mt. Hope St 1,950 

Josephine Lynch, Geography, Spelling and Penmanship. . .123 Andrews St. 1,450 

H. Gertrude Lyons, Mathematics, Penmanship, Spelling 

and Business Practice 82 Hanks St 1,950' 

Helen L. Mansfield, English.. _ _ 12 White St 1,950 

Addie B. Merrill, Mathematics and Junior Business 

Training 465 Bridge St 1,950 

E. Belle Perham, Domestic Science . ..... _ ._ 100 Riverside St 1,950 

Bernice M. Quill, Mathematics and Physical Training... 105 Merrill Ave 1,610 

Marion R. Quinn, English and History 165 Branch St 1,770 

Charles J. Rodgers, Manual Arts 14 DuMerle St 2,450 

Bernice R. Sherburne, English Tyngsboro 1,950 

Bridie M. Sheridan, Geography and Flistory 94 Hoyt Ave. 1,690 

Alice D. Sunbury, English 400 Westford St 1,950 

Helen Thissell, English 260 Pine St 1,770 

Amy L. Tucke, Mathematics and Music 42 Mt. Vernon St 1,950 

Janitors 

John J. Shields 120 Bartlett St. 

John T. Rogers 384 Concord St. 

James M. Mulligan 30 Walnut St. 

Mary A. Deignan 23" Ash St. 

Susan Moran 50 Clare St. 



BUTLER SCHOOL 

Gorham Street 

Tel. 2185 

Charles E. Delorme, Master 39 Canton St $3,350 

Delia F. Brady, Geography and Hygiene 20 Dover St 1,950 

Anna J. Cawley, General Subjects 85 Rogers St 1,950 

Helen L. Clark. English rnd Latin 216 High St 1,950 

Marguerite J. Cronin, English 228 Plain St 1,950 

Mary E. Crowley, English _ 39 Moore St 1,950 

Annie J. Devine, Tunior Business Training 154 Carlisle St 1,950 

Alice G. Donohoe, Mathematics _ 50 Linden St 1,950 

Dorothy I. Driscoll, Physical Education and Drawing. .. .86 Chauncey Ave 1,85(j 

Margaret C. Fox, Mathematics and Music 8 Eddy St 1,950 

Margaret G. Hyde, English 900 Central St 1,950 

Myrtle M. Killpartrick, Domestic Science 31 Westminister St. .. 1,950 

Mary E. Lane, Ancient History and Civics 216 High St 1,950 

Philip J. Maguire, Manual Training 31 Prospect St. 2,250 

Mary L. McSorley, General Subjects 40 Huntington St 1,950 

Nellie F. Murphy, Mathematics ..86 Sherman St 1,950 

Alice C. O'Brien, English and Music 300 Wilder St 1,950 

Helen C. O'Hare, English and Music 203 Pleasant St 1,850 

Marietta E. O'Neil, English and Office 4 Penniman Circle 1,950 

Berengere M. Roy, French and Geography 14 Wannalancit St 1,850 

Sadie E. Tully, History and Civics Ill Westford St 1,950 

Janitors 

Mary A. Carney 18 Bowden St. 

Terrence F. Casey 163 Howard St. 

Thomas M. Keegan 22 Ellsworth St. 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 49 



MOODY SCHOOL 

High and Rogers Streets 

Tel. 2042 

William S. Greene, Master, Mathematics and Ancient 

History ... .250 Mansur St $3,350 

Mary F. Carolan, Arithmetic, Domestic Science, Music 

and Penmanship 527 Rogers St. 1,950 

Mary J. Campbell, Mathematics and Penmanship 20 Nesmith St 1,850 

Madeline E. Ferrin, Geography, Music and Drawing 151 Princeton St 1,610 

Margaret C. Gookin, History, Civics and Hygiene 824 Rogers St 1,950 

Grace A. Lawler, English 72 Hanks St 1,950 

E. Grace Lybrand, Latin and French 72 South Whipple St. .. 1,500 

Hazel Stevens, English High St., Chelmsford Ctr.1,950 

Janitors 

John O'Connor 124 Hoy t Ave. 

Bernard Tracy 15 Abbott St. 

Delia A. Donohue 16 West Bowers St. 



CHARLES W. MOREY SCHOOL 

Pine and Wilder Streets 

Tel. 1094 

William W. Dennett, Master 121 Sanders Ave $3,350 

Katherine F. Baker, Drawing, Literature and Latin 665 Andover St 1,950 

Leonora K. Battles, Literature and Mathematics 21 Chester St 1,950 

Ella M. Breene, Grammar and Mathematics 17 Florence Ave 1,950 

Mabel Brown, Geography and History 438 Westford St 1,950 

Anna A. Burnham, Mathematics 242 Liberty St 1,950 

Mildred M. Clevette, Mathematics, Drawing and Grammar225 Summer St 1,850 

Anna T. Coffey, History and Latin 16 Belmont St ■. . 1,950 

Annie V. Donoghue, Ancient History, Literature and 

Mathematics 48 Warwick St 1,950 

Helen A. Dow, Grammar and Mathematics 11 Robbins St 1,950 

Mary F. Foss, Practical Arts 215 Stevens St 1,950 

Hazel A. Gardner, Literature, Mathematics and Music... 100 Livingston Ave. .. 1,950 

Rose C. Geary, Drawing, History and Literature 31 Bellevue St 1,950 

Ethel D. Gordon, Geography, History and Music 61 Loring St 1,950 

Minnie C. Gray, Practical Arts and Supplies 106 Liberty St 1,950 

Laura F. Greene, Music and Office 179 Warwick St 1,950 

Irma V. Hodgman, Mathematics and Music 48 Osgood St 1,950 

Alice B. Ingham, Literature 62 Robbins St 1,950 

Jane T. Johnson, History, Literature and Music 44 Chauncey Ave 1,950 

Gertrude T. Keyes, Drawing and Geography 62 Pine St 1,950 

Ralph A. Luce, Manual Tiaining 53 Oakland St 2,450 

Harriet L. McAloon, Literature and Music 50 B St 1,950 

Katherine O'Donnell, Penmanship and Business Forms. 148 Fort Hill Ave 1,950 

Elsie E. Perron, French, Literature and Music 67 Thirteenth St 1,850 

Marjorie P. Pratt, Drawing, Grammar and History R. F. D. No. 2, Box 221 1,530 

Mary G. Quinn, Grammar and Mathematics 361 Stevens St 1,950 

Grace Scribner, Social Studies ... .. 76 Tyler Park 1,950 

Estelle L. Whitney, Composition and Grammar 13 Oakland St 1,950 

Janitors 

Cornelius Barnes 2f Morey St. 

Mary Durant , 209 Summer St. 

Elizabeth Griffin 1407 Middlesex St. 

Elmer E. Harder 347 Westford St. 

Harrison L. Morgan 92 Chelms'ford St. 



VARNUM SCHOOL 

Myrtle Street 

Tel. 2326 

Elizabeth C. Kennedy, Principal 223 Pine St $3,070 

Martina L. Boyle, Literature and English 84 Parker Ave 1,950 

Mildred F. Colloty, History and French 15 Huntington St 1,770 

Esther G. Donlon, English, Commercial Arithmetic and 

Business Practice Ill Westford St 1,950 

Rose A. Dowd, Geography and Manual Training 127 Beacon St 1,950 

Mary A. Fay, Mathematics and Geography 123 Third St 1,950 

Kathryn H. Flabavan, Enerlish and Literature 22 Ruth St 1,950 

Grace E. Frve, Domestic Science and Hygiene .9 Sanborn St 1,950 

Loretta V. Gardner, Arithmetic 795 Bridge St 1,850 



50 ROLL OF TEACHERS 



Margaret F. Howe, History 208 South St 1,950 

Arthur Lundwall, Manual Training 619 Stevens St. 2,450 

Alice W. McManmon, Ancient History, Latin and 

Literature Box 794, Lowell 1,770 

Mary R. Maguire, Grammar 190 Old Meadow Road . . 1,950 

Margaret H. Murphy, English, Drawing, Penmanship 

and Office 14 Beech St 1,950 

Leona M. Small, Geography and Grammar 31 West Sixth St 1,950 

Charlotte C. Walsh, Algebra, Music and Civics 85 Eleventh St 1,950 

Janitors 

John H. Nolan 65 Fulton St. 

P. Henry " Driscoll 16 Edwards St. 

Mary A. Moran 38 West Fifth St. 



BARTLETT SCHOOL 

Wannalancit Street 

(Normal Training School 

Tel. 293 

Anna B. Bartlett, gr. 6 Chelmsford Centre $1,520 

Katherine F. Farley, gr. 5 K. F. D. No. 3, Lowell 1,700 

Marion M. Garvey, gr. 4 105 Highland Ave 1,280 

Marie T. Hearn, gr. 4 9 Harris Ave 1,520 

Ellen E. McEvoy, Special 55 Fourth Ave 1,360 

Catherine B. O'Brien, gr. 5 Y. W. C. A 1,520 

E. Ruth Richter, gr. 5-6 217 Smith St 1,520 

Mary F. Wallace, gr. 6 98 Grove St 1,950 



BUTLER SCHOOL 

Gorham Street 

Tel. 2186 

Marion G. Carey, gr. 6 28 McKinley Ave $1,700 

Helen G. Coughlin, gr. 5 400 Stevens St 1,280 

Mary M. Cowell, gr. 6 22 London St 1,700 

*Sarah D. Ivers, gr. 4 East Chelmsford 1,700 

**Mary J. Lane, gr. 4 64 South Whipple St. .. 1,200 

Barbara E. Walker, gr. 5 12 Metheun St 1,600 

* Room in Weed Street School 

** Room in Agawan Street School 



COLBURN SCHOOL 

Lawrence Street 
Tel. 2178 

Helen M. Shean, Principal 221 High St $3,100 

Mary M. Cassidy, gr. 5 Billerica, Mass 1,600 

Elizabeth A. Conway, gr. 5 219 Church St 1,700 

Caroline A. Downey, gr. 5 56 Huntington St 1,700 

Vera E. Groves, gr. 6 79 Stevens St 1,700 

Alice W. Higgins, gr. 4 riillerica, Mass 1,700 

Katherine V. Higgins, Special 202 Concord Ct 1,200 

Christina A. Lowney, gr. 4 86 Sherman St 1,600 

Bessie K. Sullivan, gr. 4 85 Pleasant St 1,520 

Louise C. Thomas, gr. 6 85 Eleventh St 1,700 

Janitor 
Patrick J. Mahoney 16 Lyon St. 



EDSON SCHOOL 

Highland Street 
Tel. 2182 

Leo A. King, Master 4 Astor St $3,100 

Catherine M. Cahill, gr. 4 '. 42 Kinsman St 1,600 

Alice G. Carey, gr. 4 50 Manchester St 1,200 

Mary F. Concannon, gr. 6 204 Pleasant St 1,700 

Anna E. Donovan, gr. 6 104 Gates St 1,700 

Marianna L. Donovan, gr. 5 229 Stevens St 1,700 

Marietta G. Gormley, gr. 5 22 Lvon St 1,700 

Nora T. Gilman, Special 252 Metheun St 1,700 

Delia C. Maloney, gr. 5 70 Elm St 1,700 

Margie F. Marren, gr. 6 86 Rolfe St 1,700 

Ruth F. Murphy, gr. 4 56 Arlington St 1,520 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 



51 



Janitors 

John H. Condon 96 Midland St. 

George B. Markham 12 Burns St. 



GREEN SCHOOL 

Merrimack Street 

Tel. 2262 

Elizabeth Provencher, Principal 1296 Middlesex St 

Hannah M. Barrows, gr. S 66 Hanks St 

Helen M. Blessington, Special 53 Second Ave 

Agnes T. Courtney, gr. 5 11 Marsh St 

Jennie E. Fay, gr. 6 115 Stackpole St 

Mary V. Johnson, gr. 4 183 Wilder St 

Margaret M. Kelley, gr. 4 Special 540 Lawrence St 

Katherine F. McCarthy, gr. 5 647 Market St 

M. Alice TvIcCue, gr. 6 252 Metheun St 

Alice M. McDermott, gr. 4 12 Courtland St 

Clara Marchacos, gr. 4 Special 71 Southerland St 

Christine A. Mitchell, gr. 6 268 East Merrimack St. 

Mary G. O'Donoghue, gr. 4 89 Foster St 

Mary C. Sullivan, Groups 123 B St 



$2,820 
1,800 
1,440 
1,700 
1,700 
1,700 
1,200 
1,700 
1,700 
1,700 
1,280 
1,700 
1,700 
1,200 



Janitors 

Oscar W. Brown ^ 35 Livingston Ave. 

Wiliam S. McKenzie 87 Gershom Ave. 



GREENHALGE SCHOOL 

Ennell Street 

Tel. 2272 

John G. Wolcott, Master 115 Nesmith St 

Florence A. Brooks, gr. 4 15 Bertha St 

Ethel A. Chalifoux, gr. 5 157 Mt. Vernon St. . . 

M. Alice Cochrane, gr. 6 230 Cabot St 

Lucy L. Desmond, gr. 4 195 Stackpole St 

Catherine Gillick, gr. 5 998 Lakeview Ave 

Madalen Gillick, gr. 4 998 Lakeview Ave 

Rose Harrington, gr. 4 -. 75 Huntington Ave 

Ethel G. Label, gr. 5 166 Warwick st.,Methuen 

Agnes A. McGowan, Special 36 Varney St 

Helen McMahon, gr. 6 23 Fourth Ave 

Alice A. Masterson, gr. 5 14 Oakland St 

Ellen T. Muldoon, gr. 6 998 Lakeview Ave 

Grace V. Reed, gr. 6 .1096 Bridge St '. . 

Janitors 

John Barrett 18 Burnside St. 

David E. Cornock 821 Bridge St. 

James Hounsell 704 Bridge St. 



$3,100 
1,440 
1,700 
1,700 
1,600 
1,700 
1,600 
1,200 
1,360 
1,700 
1,360 
1,700 
1,700 
1,440 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN SCHOOL 

Chelmsford Street 
Tel. 2108 

D. Murray Cummings, Master 327 Rogers St. .. 

Ellen L. Floyd, gr. 4 124 Stevens St. .. 

Jennie T. Frawley, gr. 5 547 Wilder St. .. 

Alice D. Gallagher, gr. 4 236 Metheun St. 

Alice C. Gray, gr. 6 71 Whipple St. .. 

Margaret S. Jamieson, groups 19 W. Forrest St. 

Mary M. Kelley, gr. 5 1 29 Princeton St. 

Margaret C. McDonald, gr. 5 95 Florence Ave. 

Lillian E. Moran, gr. 5 17 Burlington Ave 

Catherine E. Mulligan, gr. 4 231 School St. .. 

Mary T. O'Neill, gr. 4 175 Walker St. 

Margaret M. Sparks, gr. 6 169 Fort Hill Ave. 

Mary X. .Sullivan, Ungraded 28 Dunfey St. ... 

Bride T. Sweeney, gr. 6 '. 12 Cascade Ave. 

Sarah A. Taft, gr. 6 63 Glenwood Ave. 

Janitors 

William F. Lane 287 Riverside St. 

Thomas F. Quin 34 Weed St. 



$3,100 
1,700 
1,700 
1,600 
1,600 
1,700 
1,360 
1,700 
1,360 
1,440 
1,700 
1,700 
1,200 
1,700 
1,700 



52 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 



MOODY SCHOOL 
High and Rogers Streets 
lei. 2U42 

Elizabeth M. Hanson, gr. 6 ...872 Mammoth Road .. $1,520 

Fannie G. Hobbs, gr. 4 302 Nesmith St 1,700 

Dorothy P. McGee, gr. 6 94 Beacon St 1,440 

Alice E. Ramsay, gr. 5 21 Myrtle St 1,700 

Margaret K. Riordan, gr. 5 257 Rogers St 1,700 



CHARLES W. MOREY SCHOOL 

Pine and Wilder Streets 

Tel. 1094 

Lillian E. Alistei, gr. 5 71 Wedge St $1 

Mary E. Cunningham, gr. 4-5 52 B St 1 

*Irene H. Dowd, gr. 6 1354 Gorham St 1 

'Florence A. Geary, gr. 4 31 Bellevue St 1 



*Georgianna P. Keith, gr. 4 70 Third St 1 

*Bertha Leadbetter, gr. 5 609 Stevens St 1 

**Minnie Owens, Special 4 Belmont St 1 

Charlotte Parsons, gr. 4 11 Belmont St 1 

Ellen J. Piper, Domestic Science, English and Arithmetic 55 Norcross St 1 

Lulu Turner, gr. 6 33 Warwick St 1 

Katherine M. Usher, gr. 6 32 South Walker St. .. 1 

**Grace F. Ward, gr. 5 43 Gates St 1 

* State Practice Room 

** Rooms in Franklin School 



,700 
,700 

600 
,520 
,700 
,700 

700 
,700 
,700 
,700 
,700 
,900 



PAWTUCKET SCHOOL 

Mammoth Road 

Tel. 2301 

William P. Barry, Master 1280 Middlesex St. . 

Anna I. Cassidy, gr. 6 42 Florence Ave 

Corinna G. Cover, gr. 6 16 Lombard St. ... 

Clotilda A. Delaney, gr. 4 82 Colonial Ave. .. 

•Mary M. Farrell 214 West Sixth St. 

Goldie M. Gardner, gr. 5 100 Livingston Ave, 

Loretta M. Kinsela, gr. 6 192 Highland Ave. 

Mary A. McKeon, gr. 5 37 Orchard St 

Edith T. Miles, gr. 4-5 495 Varnum Ave. 

Rose L. Porteck, gr. 6 149 Rogers St 

*Julia B. Riordan 27 Woodward Ave. 

* Open Air Room 

Janitors 

Patrick H. Kelley 33 Butterfield St. 

Aime E. Savard 311 Mammoth Road 

James E. Somerset 104 Woodward Ave. 



$3,100 
1,700 
1,700 
1,700 
1,670 
1,700 
1,700 
1,700 
1,526 
1,200 
1,850 



RIVERSIDE SCHOOL 

Woburn Street, Wigginville 

Tel. 2437 

Rosalie T. Burns, Principal 39 Whitehead Ave. 

Elizabeth A. Gilinson, gr. 6 3 Bourne St 

Anne E. Irving, Drawing, Penmanship, gr. 9, Phonics, 

Reading, Number Work, gr. 2 - 783 Lawrence St. 

Helena C. McGowan, gr. 5 236 Fairmount St. 

Etta M. Smith, gr. 4 1118 Lawrence St. 

Harriet L. Wheeler, gr. 7 64 Morton St. ... 

Janitor 

George H. McWilliams 47 Agawam St. 



.$2,820 
. 1,700 

. 1,700 

. 1,600 

. 1,700 

. 1,700 



VARNUM SCHOOL 

Myrtle Street 
Tel. 2326 

Susan F. Burbank, gr. 5 Chelmsford Centre $1,700 

Ruth F. Hathaway, gr. 6 ' 106 Durant St 1,700 

Ada E. Hoole, gr. 4 200 French St 1,700 

Alice F. Morrill, gr. 5 56 Methuen St 1,700 

Anna S. Mulligan, Groups 23 Cady St 1,360 

Alice M. Riley, gr. 6 39 Methuen St 1,200 

Ruth C. Sheldon, gr. 4 4 Sanborn St 1,360 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 53 



WASHINGTON SCHOOL 

Lang Street Near Inland 

Tel. 3529 

John E. Barr, Master 168 Sixth St $3,100 

Carrie L. Brown, gr. 4 92 Jenness St 1,700 

Mary V. Coughlin, gr. 6 15 Cross St 1,700 

Clara M. Everett, Groups Y. W. C. A 1,700 

Mary A. Murphy, gr. 4 999 Princeton St 1,700 

Olive J. Palm, gr. 5 806 Stevens St 1,700 

Esther A. Sanders, gr. 6 79 Methuen St 1,700 

Janitors 

David H. Angluin 27 Crowley St. 

Eli B. Hart 1036 Middlesex St. 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS 

The grammar school to which each primary belongs is indicated in parenthesis. 

Alice T Lee, Supervisor of Primary Grades, 12 South Walker St $2,500 

Office hours — Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 3.45 to 4.45 p. m. at the 
office of the Superintendent of Schools. 



AGAWAM (Butler) 

Anna M. Higgins, Principal, gr. 3, 2, 1, North Billerica, Mass $1,850 

Janitor 

John H. Hallett 7 Meadowcroft St. 



AMES STREET (Colburn) 

Rose E. Ma,cVey, Principal gr. 2 46 Linden St $1,850 

Catherine E. McDermott, Special 12 Courtland St 1,700 

Julia C. O'Sullivan, gr. 1 105 Mt. Washington St 1,700 

Mary C. Timmons, gr. 3 445 Merrimack St 1,700 

Janitor 

John T. McCarty 848 Bridge St. 



BARTLETT (In Bartlett School) 

Emma M. Graham, gr. 2 22 Burgess St 1,700 

Marguerite MacFadyen, gr. 2-3 821 Chelmsford St 1,440 

Frances C. Moriarty, gr. 2 12 Warwick St 1,950 

Essie E. Roche, gr. 1 1835 Middlesex St 1,700 

Mary E. Snow, gr. 1 89 School St 1,700 

Marguerite Tellier, gr. 3 51 Whitney Ave 1,440 



CABOT STREET (Green) 

Mary T. Whelley, Principal, gr. 3 254 Parkview Ave 1,850 

Ellen F. Lynch, gr. 2 104 School St 1,700 

Helen A. McKeon, gr. 1-2 37 Orchard St 1,280 

Mary J. Murphy, gr. 1 34 Butterfield St 1,700 

Janitor 

Thomas A. Green 512 Gorham St. 



CARTER STREET (Busier) 

Katherine F. Brady, Principal, gr. 2 391 Stevens St $1,850 

Henrietta I. Grady, gr. 1 91 Florence Ave 1,700 

Nora H. Leary, gr. 3 99 Pleasant St 1,700 

Janitor 

Timothy Moynihan 38 Whipple St. 



CENTRAL STREET (Colburn) 

Helen A. Drury, Principal, gr. 1 348 Wilder St $1,850 

Mary Early, gr. 3 201 Lawrence St 1,360 

Helen Brady, gr. 2 38 Blossom St 1,520 

Janitor 

William P. Black 900 Central St. 



54, 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 



CHARLES STREET (Edson) 

Alice T. Owens, Principal, gr. 3 4 Belmont St $1,850 

Katherine C. Early, gr. 2 53 Nesmith St 1,700 

Katherine R. Hey, gr. 2 . .... 26 Mill St 1,200 

Louise F. Mahoney, Sight Saving Class.... 560 Westford St 1,850 

Janitor 

James E. Leary 249 East Merrimack St. 



COLBURN (Colburn) 

Anna M. Courtney, Principal, gr. 3 445 Merrimack St $1,900 

Elizabeth R. Connell, gr. 1 19 Fort Hill Ave 1,700 

Helen M. Crowley, gr. 1-2 254 Parkview Avenue 1,700 

Helen R. Halloran, gr. 2 546 East Merrimack St 1,700 

Mary A. Hartley, Special 41 Grace St '. 1,700 

Janitor 

John Scott 732 Stevens St. 



CROSS 

Mary R. Man en, Principal, gr. 3 . . 

Annie T. Curley, gr. 2 

Katherine Kelly, gr. 1 

Alice F. Seeton, gr. 1 



STREET (Bartlett) 

86 Rolfe St $1,850 

444 Fletcher St 1,700 

452 Fletcher St 1,700 

159 Mammoth Road 1,700 



Janitor 

William H. Kennedy 73 Fletcher St. 



DOVER STREET (Morey) 

Bertha Gardner, Principal, gr. 1 32 Robbins St $1,850 

Anna J. Masterson, gr. 2 14 Oakland St 1,700 

Anna H. Rouine, gr. 3 329 Lincoln St 1,600 

Janitor 

Frank J. Bui ch 24 Canton St. 



ELIOT (Edson) 
Favor and Summer Streets 

Ellen A. Corbett, Principal, gr. 3 32 Highland St $1,850 

Emma L. Brennan, gr. 1 284 Mammoth Road 1,200 

Louise A. Fay, gr. 2 123 Third St 1,280 

Loyola McCann, gr. 1-2 17 Wentworth Ave 1.700 

Janitor 

Charles J. McCabe 135 Summer St. 



FRANKLIN (Morey) 
Branch and Middlesex Streets 

Grace F. Ward, Principal 43 Gates St $ 1,900 

Mary E. Coffey, gr. 2 ....183 Wilder St 1,440 

Mary E. Richardson, gr. 3 Chelmsford 1,700 

Catherine L. Wrenn, gr. 1 173 School St 1,360 

Janitor 

Joseph Provost 38 Branch St. 



GRAND STREET (Lincoln) 

Jennie M. Bennett, Principal, gr. 2 38 Gates St $1,850 

Neida L. Cross, gr. 1 Ill Fremont St 1,280 



Mary J.'loynahan, gr. 1 

* Room in Howard Street School 



.84 Glenwood St 1,700 



Janitor 



Ernest McGowan '. 2 Colwell Ave 



GREENHALGE 

Ruth Crowell, gr. 1 



SCHOOL (In Greenhalge School) 

150 First St 

Agnes Dudley, gr. 2 126 Coburn St 

Mary G. Dudley, gr. 2-3 126 Coburn St 

Louise E. Pollard, gr 3 9 Everett St 

Martha Rogers, gr. 3 131 Cumberland Road 

Jessie I. Stanley, gr. 1 



$1,700 

1,520 

1,700 

1,200 

1,700 

.19 Barclay St 1,440 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 



KIRK STREET 

Annie M. Robbins, Principal, gr. 3 116 Highland Ave $1,900 

Rose I. Brown, gr. 2-3 188 Chelmsford St 1,280 

Mary E. Lennon, gr. 1-2 374 High St 1,360 

Grace A. McMahon, gr. 3 23 Fourth Ave 1,600 

Eleanor S. White, gr. 4 1221 Middlesex St 1,280 

Janitor 

John S. O'Donnell 148 Fort Hill Ave. 



LAKEVIEW AVENUE (Greenhalge) 

Margaret J. McCluskey, Principal, gr. 3.. 246 Metheun St $1,850 

Katherine P. O'Brian, gr. 2 28 West Adams St 1,700 

Anna F. Joyce, gr. 1 105 Eleventh St 1,700 

Janitor 

Joseph Neaphen 39 West St. 



LAURA E. LEE (Lincoln) 
Plain and Powell Streets 

Flora H. Sprague, Principal, gr. 3 110 Branch St $1,900 

Sara M. Dean, gr. 2-1 61 Loring St 1,700 

Lena M. Robinson, gr. 2-3 68 South Walker St 1,700 

Elizabeth H. Seede, gr. 1 24 Warwick St 1,700 

Lilla M. Stanley, gr. 2 2 Horn St 1,700 

Janitor 

William J. Hunt 17 A St. 



LEXINGTON AVENUE (Bartlett) 
Tel. 4287 

Carrie M. Hart, Principal, gr. 3-4-5 77 Tyler Park $1,850 

Alma L. Ward, gr. 1-2 i .103 Read St. 1,360 

Janitor 

Timothy F. Rohan 65 Clare St. 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN (Lincoln) 

Elsie M. Puffer, gr. 3 942 Middlesex St .$l,7iX» 



LONDON STREET (Butler) 

Margaret L. Hagerty, Principal, gr. 3, 2. .34 Bellevue St $1,850 

Katherine F. Kearney, gr. 2-1 North Billerica 1,200 

Mary F. Hill, gr. 2-1 Chelmsford 1,700 

Janitor 

Peter J. Hunt 57 Greendale Ave. 



LYON STREET (Butler) 

Kate F. Murphy, Principal, gr. 3-2 ... .870 Gorham St $1,850 

Bridget V. O'Connell, gr. 1 7 Everett St 1,700 

Janitor 

John J. Manchester 906 Central St. 



MIDDLESEX VILLAGE (Morey) 
Middlesex and Cornell Streets 

Harriet F. Wakefield, Principal, gr. 5-6 .96 Grove St $1,900 

Gertrude E. Dane, gr. 1 824 Westford St : 1,700 

Genevieve Callahan, gr. 3-4 North Chelmsford i,7C(y 

Mary Kelleher, gr. 2 Ill Agawam St. 1,200 

Janitor 

Terence J. O'Loughlin 69 Foster St. 



CHARLES W. MOREY (In Charles W. Morey School) 

Natalie McQuade, gr. 2-3 13 Willie St $1,600 

* State Practice Room 



56 ROLL OF TEACHERS 



MORRILL (Green) 

Esther V. Green, Principal, gr. 2 434 Westford St '. $1,900 

M. Grace, McCue, gr. 2 252 Metheun St 1,700 

Mary F. Morris, gr. 1 5 Rosemary Ave - 1,520 

Mary E. Sheridan, gr. 1 94 Hoyt Ave 1,200 

Catherine A. Sullivan, gr. 1 434 Fletcher St 1,200 

Ruth M. Whelton, gr. 1 57 Llwellyn St 1,200 

Janitor 

Theodore Towner 13 Third St. 



PAWTUCKET (In Pawtucket School) 

Lillian W. Allard, gr. 1 50 Seventh Ave $1,440 

Katherine G. Boddy, gr. 1 51 Starbird St 1,700 

Margaret F. Bruin, gr. 2 161 School St 1,700 

Helen A. Castles, gr. 2 154 Avon St 1,700 

Eugenia L. Hogan, gr. 3 106 Avon St 1,700 

Marguerite M. McGuinness, gr. 3 682 Broadway St 1,520 



PINE STREET (Morey) 

Carrie T. Bailey, Principal, gr. 3 56 Loring St $1,850 

Helen D. Swain, gr. 1 12 Warwick St 1,700 

Grace I. Washburn, gr. 2 390 Wilder St 1,700 

Janitor 

Joseph M. Hunt 144 Winthrop Ave. 



POND STREET (Moody) 
Pond and High Streets 

Adelaide Crowley, Principal, gr. 1 115 Fort Hill Ave $1,850 

*Maud E. Green, gr. 1 834 Westford St 1,700 

Mary I. Halloran, gr. 2 546 East Merrrimack St 1,700 

Marietta L. O'.Donnell, gr. 3 148 Fort Hill Ave 1,360 

* Room in High Street School 

Janitor 
Timothy F. Harrington 122 Fayette St. 



POWELL STREET (Lincoln) 

Viola A. Hamblett, Principal, gr. 2-1 ....53 Warwick St. $1,850 

Gladys Tucker, gr. 3-2 9 Evergreen St., Chelmsford Centre.. 1,520 

Janitor 

James A. Buckley 324 Middlesex St. 



RIVERSIDE (In Riverside School) 

Ruby C. Blain, gr. 3-2 217 West London St $1,360 

Charlotte O. Lowe, gr. 2-1, Domestic Science2010 Middlesex St 1,800 



SYCAMORE STREET (Moody) 

Florence E. Rowell, Principal, gr. 3-4 388 Wentworth Ave $1,850 

Elizabeth B. Dame, gr. 2 3 Parkview Ave 1,700 

M. Beatrice Devine, gr. 1 158 Mt. Vernon St 1,200 

Janitor 

Dennis A. Harrington 495 High St. 



TENTH STREET (Varnvm) 

Mary F. Beane, Principal, gr. 3 212 Tenth St $1,900 

Alice M. French, gr. 1 112 Beech St 1,700 

Alice A. Holtham, gr. 2-3 1107 Bridge St 1,700 

Evelyn G. Hyde, gr. 1 42 Humnhrev St 1,280 

Fannie H. Murphy, gr. 2 42 Twelfth St 1,700 

Janitor 

Winfield S. Cross Ill Fremont St. 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 57 



WASHINGTON (In Washington School) 

Jessie M. Agnew, gr. 2 West Chelmsford $1,700 

Estelle Coffey, gr. 3 183 Wilder St 1,280 

Rose Duffin, gr. 1 167 Howard St 1,360 

Sara Swan Griffin, Special 121 South Walker St 1,700 

Alberta M. McQuesten, gr. 2 118 D St 1,700 

Marie F. Reynolds, gr. 1 37 Marlborough St 1,280 



WEED STREET (Butler) 

Lilla M. McEvoy, Principal, gr. 2-3 210 Pawtucket St 1,850 

Mary F. Devine, gr. 1 1527 Gorham St. E. Chelmsford .... 1,700 

Janitor 

John N. Palm 369 Lawrence St. 



WEST SIXTH STREET (Greenhalge) 

Elizabeth F. Lamere, Principal, gr. 2 ....261 East Merrimack St $1,850 

Florence E. Archibald, gr. 2-3 112 Fremont St 1,700 

Mabel A. Metcalf, gr. 1 93 Vernon St 1,700 

Catherine M. O'Connor, gr. 1 536 Fletcher St 1,280 

Janitor 

Adam McElroy 670 Bridge St. 



WORTHEN STREET (Green) 

Mary E. Meehan, Principal, gr. 1 228 Worthen St $1,850 

Helen M. Barrett, gr. 1 19 Burnside St 1,200 

Marion E. McMaster, gr. 1 56 Rolfe St : 1,700 

Janitor 

Charles E. Clark' 11 Carter St. 



KINDERGARTENS 



AGAWAM STREET (In Agawam Primary) 

Sarah G. Sparks, Principal 59 Elm St $1,500 



BARTLETT (In Bartlett School) 

Helen W. Ncyes, Principal 102 Butman Road $1,360 

Christine MacPherson, 268 Liberty St 1,360 



CENTRAL STREET (In Central Street School) 

Gladys T. Parsons, Principal 158 Hale St $1,500 

Elizabeth C. Fulton 45 Robbins St 1,280 



CHARLES STREET (In Colburn Primary) 

Mabel D. Nickerson, Principal 125 Clark Road $1,500 

S. Alice Knapp 281 East Merrimack St 1,440 



DOVER STREET (In Dover Street Primary) 

Elizabeth A. Wilson, Principal 15 South Canton St $1,500 

Elizabeth P. Carmichael 22 Rolfe St 1,280 



FRANKLIN (In Franklin Primary) 

N. Grace Taylor, Principal 5 Ware St $1,500 

Marion E. Howard 4 Barton Ave 1,200 



HOWARD STREET (In Howard Street Primary) 

Gertrude A. Roberts, Principal Chelmsford, P. O. Box 36 $1,500 

Gertrude J. Regan 210 Mammoth Road 1,200 

Janitor 
Ernest McGowan 2 Colwell Ave. 



LAKEVIEW AVENUE (In Lakeview Avenue Primary) 

Anna M. Ford, Principal 221 High St $1,500 

Katherine E. Thomas 85 Eleventh St 1,200 



LAURA E. LEE (In Lau»-a E. Lee Primary) 

Katharine M. Crowley, Principal 115 Fort Hill Ave $1,500 

Marion A. Condon 96 Midland St 1,200 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 



MIDDLESEX VILLAGE (In Middlesex Village Primary) 

Theresa L. White, Principal 158 Dartmouth St $1,500 



MOODY (In High Street Primary) 

Marietta King, Principal — On Leave 205 btackpoie St .' 

Esther L. Cooney 31 Adam Road 1,500 

Eleanor M. McPadden 19 Myrtle St 1,200' 



MORRILL (In Morrill Primary) 

Magdalen Cooney, Principal 31 Adam Road $1,360 

Catherine Burns 84 Metheun St 1,200 



PAWTUCKET (Mammoth Road) 

Hortense Tabor, Principal 82 Riverside St $1,500 

Helen Eveleth 147 Wentworth Ave 1,440 

Janitor 
Patrick H. Kelley 33 Butterfield St. 



PINE STREET (In Pine Street Primary) 

Louie 1. Smith, Principal 549 Westford St $1,500 

Hortense M. Lamere 13 Ralph St 1,'ilO 



SYCAMORE (In Sycamore Primary) 

Margaret A. Hogan, Principal 117 Clark Road $1,280 

Frances Graves 270 Varnum Ave 1,200 



VARNUM (In Varnum School) 

Ella M. Penn, Principal 31 Sanders Ave $1,500 

Marion Simpson .'..., 67 Metheun St 1,440 



WASHINGTON (In Washington School) 

Doris Childs, Principal 256 Gibson St $1,500 

Ethel M. Guilfoy 509 Wilder St 1,200 



WEED STREET (In Weed Street Primary) 

Gertrude B. Crowley, Principal 115 Fort Hill Ave $1,500 



CONTINUATION SCHOOL 

HIGH SCHOOL ANNEX 
Tel. 6225 

Thomas A. Ginty, Director 117 Andov'er St $3,100 

Mary E. King, Clerk 22 Walnut St 1,400 

Academic Subjects 

Julia M. Driscoll 47 Grace St 1,850 

Walter M. Glasheen 66 Havilah St 1,960 

Anna T. McCarron 228 High St 2,000 

Katherine C. O'Neil 175 Walker St 1,850 

William J. Reardon 43 Florence Ave 2,220 

Domestic Science 

M. Katherine Gallagher 300 Wilder St 1,800 

Instructor in Machine Shop Practice 

William G. Hannafin 15 Sargent St 2,000 

Teacher of Millinery and Dressmaking 

Margaret A. Harrington 211 Christian St. . = 1,700- 

Teacher of Dressmaking 

Elizabeth J. Regan 7 Porter St 1,700 

Instructor in Woodworking 

Raymond W. Slater 1939 Middlesex St 2,100 

Physical Instructor 

Major Colby T. Kittredge 141 Cabot St 500 

Janitor 

Edward F. Dougherty 4 Colwell Ave. 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 59 



VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 

Mann School Building, Broadway 
Tel. 2932 

Thomas F. Fisher, Director 100 Sanders Ave $3,300 

Margaret E. McCann, Clerk 196 Aiken Ave 1,400 

Sub-Master and Head of Machine Department 

Maurice A. Butterfield 12 June St 2,300 

Machine Shop Practice 

Charles J. Welsh 77 Billings St. 2,200 

Automobile Repairing 

John J. Gildee, Head 112 D St 2,600 

Robert B. Derbyshire 5 Sladen St. . . . x 2,200 

George H. Dozois 11 Spaulding St 2,200 

English and Mathematics 

Timothy M. Tully 96 White St 1,330 

Science 

William B. Hilliard 20 Webber St 2,200 

Electrical Department 

Chester W. MacDonald, Head 22 Bellevue St 2,300 

Thomas V. Hutton Dracut Centre 1.800 

Ernest A. Shafter 373 Beacon St 2,200 

Harry M. Tabor 84 Billings St 2,200 

Civics and Hygiene 

Walter J. Markham ' 18 South Walker St 1,960 

Academics 

Vincent M. McCartin 236 Rogers St 1,900 

Carpentry 

Fred F. Wiggin Chelmsford Mass 2,200 

James P. McCann 734 Rogers St 1,600 

Cabinet Making 

John F. Moran 222 Cross St 1,800 

Mechanical Drawing 
Andrew J. Moynahan 84 Glenwood St 2,200 

Janitor 

George P. Daley 98 Walker St. 

Oiler 

Thomas S. Crowley 31 Nineteenth St. 



GIRLS' DEPARTMENT— HOMEMAKING 

HIGH SCHOOL ANNEX 

Tel. 5411 

Head of Girls' Department 

Esther M. Downing 434 Westford St $2,000 

Cooking 

Ruberta M. Bramhall, Head 84 Tenth St 1,900 

Kathleen E. Hogan 35 Glenwood St 1,200 

Doris Sanborn 260 Mansur St 1,300 

Dressmaking 

Agnes R. Burns '. 220 West Sixth St 1,800 

Lillian E. Chisholm 333 Bridge St 1,20.0 

Mary H. Mehan 169 Merrimack St ...1,800 

M. Eleanor Kivlan 73 Moore St 1,200 

Millinery 

Mary H. Mehan 169 Merrimack St 1,800 

Home Nursing 

Helen F. O'Rourke, R. N 154 Shaw St. 

Academic Subjects 

Elizabeth H. Flahavan 22 Ruth St 1,900 

Mary H. Flahavan 22 Ruth St 1,800 

Agnes L. Liston 96 Fort Hill Ave 1,800 

Janitors 

Arthur R. Dana 465 Bridge St. 

William J. Hunt, 2nd 3 Fourth St. 



60 ROLL OF TEACHERS 



SPECIAL TEACHERS 



Musical Director 

Frederick O. Blunt .268 Liberty St $2,500 

Assistants in Music 

Gertrude F. O'Brien .91 Riverside St 2,000 

Katherine V. Hennessey 198 Pine St 1,550 

Supervisors of Drawing 

Addie E. Edwards 93 Vernon St 2,000 

Edith C. Merchant 268 Westford St 2,000 

Wilhelmina Young .625 Central St 1,400 

Teacher of Reading and Expression 

Mary H. Casey 46 June St ,. . 1,400 

Teachers of Sewing 

Esther M. Owens, Supervisor 4 Belmont St 1,950 

Josephine Y. Grant 545 School St 1,600 

Louise H. McOsker 567 Andover St 1,810 

Margaret G. Riley 39 Methuen St 1,650 

Grace E. Stevens Stedman St., Chelmsford Centre ... 1,700 

Supervisor and Director of Physical Education in Elementary Schools 

Donald R. Mclntyre 242 Wentworth Ave 500 

Assistants to Physical Director 

Toseph M. Duffy 199 High St 2.050 

Helen R. Gilbride 58 Tyler Park 1,440 

Nelle D. Horner 353 Westford St 1,950 

Francis J. O'Brien 282 Nesmith St 2,050 

Tames P. H. Roane 361 Stevens St 2.050 

Olga F. Shay ..121 Eleventh St 1,690 

Paul F. Sullivan 256 East Merrimack St 2,050 

Director of Fire and Accident Prevention 

Major Walter R. Jeyes 365 Parker St 2,050 

Supervisors of Penmanship 

William A. Donovan 272 Merrimack St 500 

Margaret M. Garvey 144 Cumberland Road 1,900 

Albert D. Mack 124 Parkview Ave 500 

James A. Shanley 43 Rhodora St 50'J 

Supervisor of English in Elementary School 

Morton A. Sturtevant 77 Harris Ave . . 300 

Full-Time Teacher of Americanization Classes 

Marietta King 205 Stackjole St 1,709 



DENTAL CLINIC 

(In Worthen Street School) 

Dr. Patrick Mullane 219 Central St. 

Dr. Frederick F. Donahoe _ 305 Sun # Bldg. 

Assistant to Dentist 
Eva M. Lantagne 678 Bridge St. 

SCHOOL HYGIENE 

P'rancis J. Finnegan, M. D., Director 238 Moore St. 

SCHOOL NURSES 

Margaret Craig 102 Bourne St. 

Mary Douglass 281 East Merrimack St. 

Marietta M. Dwyer 23 Sidney St. 

Mary Fitzpatrick 52 Fay St. 

Sarah Fox 38 Metheun St 

Mary E. Frazier 54 Starbird St. 

Josephine M. Leclair 104 School St. 

Rose V. Lettrell 13 Harrison St. 

Clarina Morier 759 Merrimack St. 

Anna C. O'Dwyer '. 148 Midland St. 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

C. Stoyle Baker, M. D 15 Holyrood Ave. 

John jf'. Boyle, M. D 32 Whipple St. 

James J. Cassidy, M. D Ill Riverside St. 

Winifred M. Wolls-Devine, M. D 27 Parkview Ave. 

George O. Lavallee, M. D 790 Merrimack St. 

Charles M. Roughan, M. D 65 Merrill Ave. 

Emma Y. Slaughter, M. D 545 School St. 

Edward O. Taber, M. D : 370 Beacon St. 



PERMANENT SUBSTITUTES 

Martha Gallagher 82 Humphrey St. 

Helen I. Hannon 32 Gertrude Avi . 

Mary W. O'Connor 298 Riverside St. 

Stella G. Moloney 177 Summer St. 

Alice M. Carey 24 Waterf ord St. 

Margaret C. Gallagher 82 Humphrey St. 

Rose Q. Leary '. 137 Hoyt Ave. 

Lowena Mills , 274 Gibson St. 

Mary K. Daley North Chelmsford 

Alice E. Rourke 186 Aiken Ave. 

Mary L. Geary 31 Bellevue St. 

Helen E. Baker 179 Princeton St. 

Grace L. Moran 17 Burlington Ave. 

Marguerite Tellier 51 Whitney Ave. 

Mary C. Savage 62 Mt. Vernon St. 

ElizaDeth T. Cassidy North Billerica 

Agnes E. Farrell 214 West Sixth St. 

Anne Mullaney 117 Hoyt Ave. 

Kathryn M. Higgins 200 Pleasant St. 

Lillian C. M. Reidy 26 Saratoga St. 



ABSENT ON LEAVE 

Flora M. Common Vocational School 

Edith L. Joyce Varnum Junior High School 

Virginia Sargent Elementary 

Rachel Woodworth High School 



62 ROLL OF TEACHERS 



EVENING HIGH SCHOOL 

Henry H. Harris, Principal .93 Eleventh St. 

E. Helena Rivet, Principal's Assistant 271 Beacon St. 

Elementary English 

Mary E. Harrigan 73 Nesmith St. 

Joseph A. McAvinnue 339 Mammoth Road 

English I, II, III 

Hildegarde I St. Onge 99 Walker St. 

English I Civics 

Loretto A. McManmon Merrimack Ave., Dracut 

English I, United States History, Ancient History 

Frances Masterson 14 Oakland St. 

English I, II, Advanced Arithmetic 

James J. Clinton 64 Seventh Ave. 

Business English, Composition, Literature 

Morton A. Sturtevant 77 Harris Ave. 

Civil Service 

Martin E. Connors 143 Wentworth A"t. 

Thomas F. Pyne 75 Merrill Ave. 

Physiology, Spanish I, II 

Edward B. Cornell 88 Durant St. 

Physics I, II, Chemistry 

Emrie Gelineau 61 Dracut St. 

Astronomy, English II, III 

Alice O. Stickney 599 School St. 

Elementary Arithmetic 

John J. Gardner 795 Bridge St. 

Addie B. Merrill 465 Bridge St. 

Advanced Arithmetic 

Joseph G. Pyne 87 Merrill Ave. 

Commercial Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry 

Elmer G. Brennon 97 Georgia Ave. 

Commercial Geography, English III, United States History 

Mary H. Killpartrick 31 Westminster St. 

Commercial Law, Salesmanship 

Carmen G. Rediker 282 Appleton St. 

Algebra, English II, Latin 

Elizabeth Irish 11 Willow St. 

Secretarial Training, Stenography III 

Orton E. Beach 858 Chelmsford St. 

Stenography I 

Elizabeth G. McCarthy 14 Edson St. 

Ruth F. Murphy 56 Arlington St. 

Stenography II x 

Albertine Bernier 91 West Sixth St. 

Margaret L. Seeton 12 Third Ave. 

Stenography I, Typewriting I 

Mary A. Egan 33 Cady St. 

Annabelle C. Lowney 86 Sherman St. 

Typewriting I, II, III 

Joan C. Shanley 26 Phillips St. 

Typewriting II, III 
Ruth L. Eaton 49 Pine St. 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 63 



Bookkeeping and Accounting I 

Joseph M. Donoghue 22 Fairfield St. 

Eugene J. Donovan 809 Lawrence St. 

William A. Donovan 272 Merrimack St. 

Bookkeeping and Accounting II 

James A. Shanley 43 Rhodora St. 

Bookkeeping and Accounting III 

Albert D. Mack 124 Parkview Ave. 

Advanced Penmanship 

Margaret M. Garvey 144 Cumberland Road 

Penmanship 

Katherine M. O'Donnell 148 Fort Hill Ave. 

Sarah A. Taff 63 Glenwood St. 

Manual Training I, II, III 

Charles J. Rodgers 14 DuMerle St. 

Charles E. Seede 26 Fairgrove Ave. 

Manual Training II 

Peter J. Gulesian Blanchard Ave., Billerica 

Mechanical Drawing, Manual Training 

Raymond W. Slater 1939 Middlesex St. 

Oral Expression 

Gladys W. Mevis 234 Varnum Ave. 



ELEMENTARY EVENING SCHOOLS 

BUTLER 

Charles E. Delorme, Principal 39 Canton St. 

Sarah D. Ivers East Chelmsford 

Philip J. Maguire 31 Prospect St. 

CABOT STREET 
(For Girls Only) 

Catherine E. McDermott 12 Courtland St. 

Mary E. McKeon 37 Orchard St. 

COLBURN 

Helen M. Shean, Principal 221 High St. 

Vera E. Groves 79 Stevens St. 

Agnes A. McGowan 36 Varney St. 

Bridget V. O'Connell 7 Everett St. 

Bessie K. Sullivan 85 Pleasant St. 

EDSON 

Leo A. King, Principal 4 Astor St. 

Mary M. Cowell 22 London St. 

Mary Early 201 Lawrence St. 

Hazel Gardner 100 Livingston Ave. 

GREEN 

Charles D. Foley, Principal 178 Highland Ave. 

Margaret F. Bruin 161 School St. 

Mary E. Coffey 183 Wilder St. 

Mildred F. Colloty IS Huntington St. 

Mary V. Coughlin IS Cross St. 

Anna M. Courtney 445 Meriimack St. 

Esther G. D-nlan Ill Westford St. 

Kathryn H. Flahavan 22 Ruth St. 

Jennie T. Frawley 547 Wilder St. 

Katherine Kelly * 452 Fletcher St. 

Charlotte O. Lowe 2010 Middlesex St. 

Ellen F. Lynch 104 School St. 

Alice A. Masterson 14 Oakland St. 

Katherine C. O'Neill 175 Walker St. 

Elizabeth C. Provencher 1296 Middlesex St. 

Bride T. Sweeney 12 Cascade Ave. 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 



GREENHALGE 

John H. Gillick, Principal 992 Lakeview Ave. 

Mary _ F. Concannon 204 Pleasant St. 

Catherine T. Gillick 998 Lakeview Ave. 

Annie M. Robbins 116 Highland Ave. 

Martha Rogers 131 Cumberland Road 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN 

D. Murray Cummings, Principal 327 Rogers St. 



EVENING VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 

MEN'S DEPARTMENT 

Thomas F. Fisher, Director 100 Sanders Ave. 

Margaret E. McCann, Clerk 196 Aiken Ave. 

Automobile Department 

John J. Gildee, Head 112 D St. 

Robert B. Derbyshire 5 Sladen St. 

George H. Dozois 11 Spaulding ' St. 

Cabinet Making 

John F. Moran 222 Cross St. 

Carpentry 

Fred F. Wiggin Chelmsford, Mass. 

John Briscoe Dracut, Mass. 

Electricity 

Chester W. Macdonald, Head 22 Bellevue St. 

Firemen and Stationary Engineers 

Daniel J. Callahan 22 Second Ave. 

Daniel Duffy 34 Agawam St. 

Blue Print Reading and Construction Drawing 

Andrew J. Moynahan 84 Glenwood St. 

Machine Department 

Maurice A. Butterfield, Head 12 June St. 

William B. Hilliard 20 Webber St. 

Michael J. Donahue 62 Thayer St. 

Charles J. Welsh 77 Billings St. 

Plumbing 

John H. MeGuinness 682 Broadway St. 

Sheet Metal Draughting 

Thomas F. O'Brien S West Eleventh St. 



WOMEN'S DEPARTMENT 

Practical Arts 

Esther M. Downing Director ^ 434 Westford St. 

Mary E. Haggerty, Clerk S3 A St. 

Cooking 

Ruberta Bramhall, Head 84 Tenth St. 

Elizabeth Anderson 1015 Gorham St. 

Elizabeth Goodell 271 Foster St. 

Kathleen Hogan . . .35 Glenwood St 

Helen King 64 Hanks St. 

Kathenne King 4 Astor St. 

Ruth Handley Lannon 58 Columbus Ave. 

Nano Leahey 248 Rogers St. 

Cora McGauvran 51 Tenth St. 

Sadie Miller 13 Harrison St. 

Doris Sanborn 260 Mansur St. 

Juna Sleeper 53 Stevens St. 

Marion Swann 94 Beech St. 

Maybelle Sullivan 724 Bridge St. 



ROLL OF TEACHERS 65 



Dressmaking 

Anna O'Day Foye, Head 632 Andover St. 

Caro Allen : , 476 Varnum Ave. 

Annie Boyle 32 Whipple St. 

Mary Bradley 903 Gorham St. 

Agnes Burns 220 West Sixth St. 

Katherine Burns 79 Andrews St. 

Lillian Chisholm 333 Bridge St. 

Elizabeth Dwyer 77 Mt. Washington St. 

Dora Hennessey 710 Stevens St. 

Mary Hennessey 34 Arlington St. 

Marion Lawler 94 Stromquist Ave. 

Katherine MacDonald 407 High St. 

Laura Landry 39 Arlington St. 

Margaret McGurn 110 South Walker St. 

Mildred Mulqueeney 18 Olney St. 

Orina Mongrain 1056 Bridge St. 

Minnie Morgan 370 Lincoln St. 

Mary Rourke 22 Abbott St. 

Mary O'Keefe 36 Alder St. 

Isabel Roark ... 69 Fifth St. 

Nellie Rourke 332 Stevens St. 

Helen Rouse 201 Summer St. 

Elzina Secord *...'. 12 Dover St. 

Marguerite Turgeon 282 Westford St. 

Dorothy Ward 372 Lincoln St. 

Rose Ward 635 Broadway St. 

Elzina Wince 5 Jewett St. 

Helen Zollinger Chelmsford, Mass. 

Millinery 

Mary H. Mehan, Head 169 Merrimack St. 

Annie Daly 332 Stevens St. 

Ella Donohoe 91 Fort Hill Ave. 

Lena Gendron 19 Royal St. 

Evelyn Hebert 104 Appleton St. 

Arthemise Hotin 709 Merrimack St. 

Katherine Keyes 62 Pine St. 

Lena Lowrey 43 Jewett St. 

Ella Mellen 235 Hale St. 

Marietta Michaud 113 Varnum Ave. 

Mary Murphy '. 185 Moore St. 

Agnes Weston 137 Stackpole St. 

Home Nursing 

Marietta Dwyer, R. N 22 Sidney St. 

Helen F. O'Rourke, R. N 154 Shaw St. 

Embroidery 

Etta McDermott North Billerica 



66 SALARY SCHEDULE 



High School 



Head Master $4,600 

Master 3,500 

Sub-Masters , , 3,400 

Junior Masters 3,000 

Junior Sub-Masters 2,700 

Men Teachers $1,700 to 2,500 

First Year, $1,700; second year, $1,830; third year, $1,960; fourth 
year, $2,090; fifth year, $2,220; sixth year, $2,350; seventh year, $2,500; 
department head, $100 in excess of schedule. 

Women Teachers $1,400 to 2,000 

First year, $1,400; second year, $1,500; third year, $1,600; fourth 
year, $1,700; fifth year, $1,800; sixth year, $1,900; seventh year, $2,000; 
department head, $100 in excess of schedule. 

Junior High Schools 

Masters (Maximum reached in seventh year) $2,170 to $3,350 

Teachers 1,450 to 1,950 

First year, $1,450; second year, $1,530; third year, $1,610; fourth 
year, $1,690; fifth year, $1,770; sixth year, $1,850; seventh year, $1,950. 

Elementary Schools 

Masters (Maximum reached in seventh year) $1,920 to $3,100 

Teachers 1,200 to 1,700 

First year, $1,200; second year, $1,280; third year, $1,360; fourth 
year, $1,440; fifth year, $1,520; sixth year, $1,600; seventh year, $1,700. 

Principals of Primary Schools 

Primary Principals, $150 above elementary schedule. 

Principal of a six room primary school $200 above elementary schedule. 

Supervisor of Primary Grades, $2,500. 

Kindergartens 

Principals $1,500 

Assistants $1,200 to $1,440 

First year, $1,200; second year, $1,280; third year, $1,360; fourth 
year, $1,440. 



SALARY SCHEDULE 67 



Vocational School 

Director $3,300 

Clerk . . 1,400 

Men Teachers $1,600 to 2,200 

First year, $1,600; second year, $1,700; third year, $1,800; fourth 
year, $1,900; fifth year, $2,000; sixth year, $2,100; seventh year, $2,200. 

Women Teachers $1,200 to 1,800 

First year, $1,200; second year, $1,300; third year, $1,400; fourth 
year, $1,500; fifth year, $1,600; sixth year, $1,700; seventh year, $1,800. 
Those in supervisory position to receive $100 above schedule. 

Continuation School 

Director $3,100 

Clerk 1,400 

Men Teachers $1,600 to 2,200 

First year, $1,600; second year, $1,700; third year, $1,800; fourth 
year, $1,900; fifth year, $2,000 ; sixth year, $2,100; seventh year, $2,200. 

Women Teachers $1,300 to 1,850 

First year, $1,300; second year, $1,400; ihird year, $1,500; fourth 

year, $1,600; fifth year, $1,700; sixth year, $1,800; seventh year, $1,850. 
Teachers in the Vocational and Continuation schools who are 

entitled to first or second grade certificates are placed on the schedule 

for teachers in the high school. 



Special Teachers 

Music $1,200 to $2,500 

Drawing 1,400 to 2,000 

Sewing 1,200 to 1,700 

Manual Training (Maximum reached in fifth year) .... 1,800 to 2,200 

Physical Training 

Men Teachers 1,800 to 2,200 

Women Teachers 1,200 to 1,700 

Penmanship 

Part time supervisors in Elementary Schools to receive $500 per 
year. 

Full time supervisor in Elementary Schools to receive $200 above 
elementary schedule. 

English (part time supervisor in Elementary Schools) 300 

Band 1,000 



Temporary Teachers 

Temporary Teachers in High Schools, per day $6.00 

Permanent Substitutes in Elementary Schools, per day 6.00 

Kindergarten Substitutes, per day 3.00 



TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 



Teachers' Certificates 



Granted Since January 1, 1925 

First Grade 

Ralph S. Charles, Tufts, 1923 Lowell, Mass. 

Charles H. J. O'Donnell, M. I. T., 1921 .Lowell, Mass. 

William J. O'Brien, Boston College, 1919 Lowell, Mass. 

William Grant Foss, Boston University, 1925 Lowell, Mass. 

Philip L. Mahoney, University of Ottawa, 1925 Lowell, Mass. 

Edwin S. Markham, Holy Cross, 1923 Lowell, Mass. 



Second Grade 

Doris Alexander, Wellesley, 1925 Lowell, Mass. 

Christine Kane, Boston University, 1925 Lowell, Mass. 

Anne Loretta Mahoney, Boston University, 1925 Lowell, Mass. 

Rose Neyman, Boston University, 1925 Lowell, Mass-. 

Mary I. Riley, D'Youville, 1925 Lowell, Mass. 

Elizabeth G. Ward, Skidmore, 1925 Lowell, Mass. 



Third Grade 

Helen E. Baker Lowe 

Alice M. Carey Lowe 

Elizabeth T. Cassidy Lowe 

Mary K. Daley Lowe 

Agnes E. Farrell Lowe 

Margaret C. Gallagher Lowe 

Martha Gallagher Lowe 

Mary L. Geary Lowe 

Helen I. Hannon Lowe 

Kathryn M. Higgins Lowe 

Rose Q. Leary Lowe 

Mary W. O'Connor . : Lowe 

Lowena Mills Lowe 

Stella G. Moloney Lowe 

Grace L. Moran Lowe 

Anne Mullaney Lowe 

Lillian C. M. Reidy Lowe 

Alice E. Rourke Lowe 

Mary C. Savage Lowe 

Marguerite Tellier Lowe 



Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 
Normal 



Fourth Grade 

Marion Condon, Leslie Kindergarten Normal, 1925 . . 
Mary Danckert, Leslie Kindergarten Normal, 1925 . . . 
Mary Dexter, Wheelock Kindergarten Normal, 1925 
Marion Durrell, Leslie Kindergarten Normal, 1925 
Eleanor McPadden, Leslie Kindergarten Normal, 1925 
Gertrude Regan, Leslie Kindergarten Normal, ..1925. 



Lowell, Mass. 
.Lowell, Mass. 
.Lowell, Mass. 
.Lowell, Mass. 
. Lowell, Mass. 

Lowell, Mass. 



AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 



69 



Authorized Text Books 

FOR 
High and Elementary Schools 

Adopted by the School Committee of Lowell, Mass., June, 1923 



HIGH SCHOOL 



Rhetoric 

Enlarged Practice Book 

line Odyssey 

Buehler 

Tales from Shakespeare 

Last of the Mohicans 

House of the Seven Gables 

Twice Told Tales 

Illiad 

Illiad 

Silas Marner 

Julius Caesar 

Merchant of Venice 

Macbeth 

Lady of the Lake 

Ivanhoe 

Life of Johnson 

Sir Roger De Coverley 

L'Allegro and 11 Penseroso 

Speech on Conciliation with America 

Idylls of the King 

Vision of Sir Launfal 

Ancient Mariner 

Chaucer to Arnold 

Essays of Elia 

Tales of a Wayside Inn 

Grandmother's Story 



ENGLISH 

Adopted 

Brooks & Hubbard American Book Co. 

Hitchcock Henry Holt & Co. 

Church The MacMillan Co. 

Gray American Book Co. 

Lamb Ginn & Co. 

Cooper D. C. Heath & Co. 

Hawthorne Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Hawthorne Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Pope Sibiey & Ducker 

Bryant Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Eliot Ginn & Co. 

SnaKespeare D. C. Heath & Co. 

Shakespeare Leach, Shewell & Sanborn 

Shakesneare Ginn & Co. 

Scott American Book Co. 

Scott American Book Co. . 

Macaulay Ginn & Co. 

Addison & Steele American Book Co. 

Milton Ginn & Co. 

Burke Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Tennyson Ginn & Co. 

Lowell Houghton, Mifflin ft Co. 

Coleridge The MacMillan Co. 

George The MacMillan Co. 

Lamp Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Longfellow Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Holmes Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 



Rhetoric 

Handbook of Composition 

Exercises in English 

Students' Hist, of Eng. Literature 

Introduction to Eng. Literature 

Self-Cultivation in English 

Life of Goldsmith 

Tales of a Traveler 

Palamon and Arcite 

Schrab and Rustum 

Prologue to the Canterbury Tales 

Essays on Clive and Hastings 

Washington's Farewell Address 

Autobiography of Benj. Franklin 

Selected Essays 

She Stoops to Conquer 

Twelfth Night 

King Lear 

Coriolanus 

Henry Fifth 

Midsummer Night's Dream 

New Practice Book 

High School English 

Business English 

Rhetoric 

Selections from Lincoln 

Life of Johnson 

Pilgrim's Progress 
Birds and Bees 
Tale of Two Cities 



Supplementary 

Shackford-Judson Sanborn ft Co. 



D. C. Heath & Co. 

D. C. Heath & Co. 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Henry Holt & Co 

Houghton, Mifflin & >_o. 

Ginn & Co. 

Longman's, Green & Co. 

Leach, Shewell & Sanborn 

Henry Holt & Co. 

Houghton, Mifflin ft Co. 

Ginn ft Co. 

Houghton, Mifflin ft Co. 

American Book Co. 

American Book Co. 

Houghton, Mifflin ft Co. 

Houghton, Mifflin ft Co. 

D. C. Heath ft Co. 

Ginn & Co. 

Houghton, Mifflin ft Co. 

D. C. Heath ft Co. 

Henry Holt ft Co. 
Brubacher&SnyderChas. E. Merrill Co. 
Davis ft Linghar.iGinn ft Co. 
Scott ft Denny Allyn & Bacon 

Chas. E. Merrill Co. 

D. C. Heath ft Co. 

Ginn ft Co. 

American Book Co. 

Houghton, Mifflin ft Co. 

D. C. Heafh ft Co. 



Wooley 

Strang 

Simonds 

Pancoast 

Palmer 

Irving 

Irving 

Dryden 

Arnold 

Chaucer 

Macauley 

Foster 

Emerson 

Goldsmith 

Shakespeare 

Shakespeare 

Shakespeare 

Shakespeare 

Shakespeare 

Hithcock 



Beave 
Boswell 

Bunyan 

Burroughs 

Dickens 



AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 



American Poems 
Vicar of Wakefield 

Sketch Book 

Selected Ballads and Lyrics 

Leaflets 

Old Testament Narratives 

Odyssey 

Poems and Tales 

Marmion 

Kenilworth 

Woodstock 

Guy Mannering 

As You Like It 

Othello 

Tempest 

Treasure Island 

Princess 

Essay on Burns 

History of the Plague 

Paradise Lost 

Golden Treasury 

Life of Nelson 

Forum of Democracy 

Short Stories 

Short Stories 

Flight of a Tartar Tribe 



Gaston 
Goldsmith 

Irving 

Lodge 

Lowell 

Nettleton 

Palmer 

Poo 

Scott 

Scott 

Scott 

Scott 

Shakespeare 

Shakespeare 

Shakespeare 

Stevenson 

Tennvson ' 

Carlyle 

Defoe 

Milton 

Palgrave 

Southey 

Watkins 

Moulton 

Hart _& Perry 

DeQuincey 



Chas. E. Merrill Co. 
American Book Co. 
Allyn & Bacon 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
Henry Holt & Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
American Book Co. 

A. L. Burt 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
Ginn & Co. 

Houghton, Mifflin & Cii. 
American Book Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 

B. H. Sanborn & Co. 
B. H. Sanborn & Co. 
Longmans Green C. 
B. fi. Sanborn & Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
Longmans Green C. 
Allyn & Bacon 
MacMillan & Co. 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
B. H. Sanborn & Co. 



French Dictionary 

French Grammar (Complete Course) 

French Reader 

French Composition 

French Syntax and Composition 

Contes et Legendes II 

Sight Reading 



FRENCH 

Adopted 

Boielle 

Fraser & Squair 

Super 

Grandgent 

Bouvet 

Guerber 

Rogers 



D. C. Heath & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 



Supplementary 

French Grammar, Shorter Course Fraser & Squair D. C. Heath & Co. 

Grammaire Francaise, Deuxieme Annee Larive & Fleury * 

Grammaire Francaise Worman American Book Co. 

French Composition Blouet 



For Transaction at Sight 



Le Beau Pays de France 
Intermediate French 
Historical French Reader 
French Newspaper Reader 
Douze Contes Nouveaux 
La Tache du Petit Pierre 
Exercices Francais 



Le Premier Livre 

La Belle France' 

Drames et Comedies 

Le Tour de la France par Deux 

Enfants 

French Reader 

Simple French 



Spink 


Ginn & Co. 




Jaques 


Ginn & Co. 




Weill 


American Book 


Co. 


Weill 


American Book 


Co 


Fontaine 


American Book 


Co. 


Mairet 


American Book 


Co. 


Pargmen 


MacMillan Co. 




rst Year Work 






Meras 


American Book 


Co. 


Monvert 


Allyn & Bacon 




Dupres 


American Book 


Co. 



Bruno American Book Co. 

Kuhns Henry Holt & Co. 

Francois & GirouxHenry Holt & Co. 



For Second and Third Year Work 



Scenes de la Revolution Francaise 

Readings from French History 

Le Dix-Septieme Siecle 

Selected Stories 

Colomba 

Les Oberles 

Contes Choisis 

La Chute 

French Lyrics 

Fables 



Lamartine D. C. Heath & Co. 

Super Allyn & Bacon 

Duval & Williams Henry Holt & Co. 



Daudet 

Merimee 

Bazin 

Bazin 

Hugo 

Bowen 

La Fontaine 



American Book Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
Henry Holt & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
D. C. Heath & Co. 
American Book Co. 



AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 



71 



Commercial French 

La France qui Travaille 
La Grammaire 
La Poudre aux Yeux 
Le Voyage de Monsieur Perrichon 
Mademoiselle de la Siegliere 
French Word Lists 
Essentials of French Pronounciation 
These marked * are imported books 



Pitman *Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons, 

London 
Jago D. C. Heath & Co. 

L a biche D. C. Heath & Co. 

Labiche & MartkiAmerican Book Co. 
Labiche & MartinGinn & Co. 
Sandeau American Book Co. 

Carter Henry Holt & Co. 

Cerf Henry Holt & Co. 

and are obtained through Shoenhof of Boston. 



German Dictionary 
Prose Composition 
German Lessons 
German Compositions 
Wihelm Tell 
Immensee 



Words of Frequent Occurrence 

Zerbrocheuer Krug 

Composition 

Der Neffe als Onkel 

L'Arrabbiata 

Zwischen Himmel und Erde 

Das Edle Blut 

Der Schwiegersohn 

Der Stumme Ratcherr 

Composition 

Das Spiehnannskind 



Adopted 




Heath 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Harris 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Harris 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Wesselhoeft 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Schiller 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Storm 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Supplementary 




Bierwirth 


■Henry Holt & Co. 


Zschokke 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Fasnacht 


The MacMillan Co. 


Schiller 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Heyse 


American Book Co. 


Ludwig 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Wildenbruch 


Henry Holt & Co. 


Baumbacot 


Henry Holt & Co. 


Riehl 


D. C. Heath & Co. 


Pope 


Henry Holt & Co. 


Riehl 


D. C. Heath & Co. 



Plane Geometry 
Secondary Algebra 
Essentials of Algebra 
Elementary Algebra 
Trigonometry 
Elementary Algebra 
Plane Geometry 
Solid Geometry 
Plane Geometry 



Plane Geometry 
McCurdy Exercises 
Essentials of Plane Geometry 
Essentials of Solid Geometry 
First Course in Algebra 
Exercises in Algebra 
Review of Algebra 
Algebra Exercises 
Plane Geometry (Reviews) 
Exercises in Alg. and Geom. 



MATHEMATICS 
Adopted 

Wentworth&SmithGinn & Co. 

Wells D. C. Heath & Co. 

Wells D. C. Heath & Co. 

Wentworth Ginn & Co. 

Wentworth Ginn & Co. 

Wells 

Wentworth&SmithGinn & Co. 

Wentworth&SmithGinn & Co. 

Wentworth Ginn & Co. 

Supplementary 

Schultz&SevenoakThe MacMillan Co. 



McCurdy 

Wells 

Wells 

Wells 

McCurdy 

Rivenburg 

Robbins 

MacGibbon 

Hale 



D. C. Heath Co. 
D. C. Heath Co. 
D. C. Heath Co. 



Siblev 
Heath 



First Greek Book 
Xenophon's Anabassi 
Greek Grammar 
Greek -English Lexicon 
Odyssey, Books I-VI 
Greek Prose Composition 



Xenophon's Hellenica, I-IV 
Illiad, Books I-VI 
Herodotus, Vol. II 



GREEK 
Adonted 

White 



Ginn & Co. 



Goodwin & WhiteGinn & Co. 
Goodwin Ginn & Co. 

Liddell & Scott American Book Co. 
Perrin & SeymourGinn & Co. 
Pearson American Book Co. 



Supplementary 

Manat 

Seymour 

Dietsch 



Ginn & Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
Teubner Edition, 
Germany 



Leipsic, 



AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 



Latin Grammar 

Cicero 

Virgil 

Latin Prose ConUHnteAwsn 

New Method of Ca&&3r 



Cicero Textj 

Virgil Texts 

Caesar Texts 

Sallust Textr 

First Book in Latin 

Caesar 

Ovid 

Nepos 

Latin Composition 

A Year in Latin 



LATIN 

Adopted 

Allen & GreenoughGinn & ' Co. 
Allen & GreenoughGinn & Co. 
Allen & KittredgeGinn & Co. 
Daniel-Brown B. H. Sanborn & Co. 

Potter B. H. Sanborn & Co. 

Supplementary- 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 

[nglis & PrettymauThe MacMillan Co. 

Allen & GreenoughGinn & Co. 

Allen & GreenoughGinn & Co. 

Barss MacMillan Co. 

Baker & Inglis American Book Co. 

W.A.Montgomery Row, Peterson & Co. 



Modern Illustrative Bookkeeping 
Seventy Lessons in ' Spelling 
Modern Business Penmanship 
Commercial Law 
Commercial Arithmetic 
Mental Arithmetic 
Mental Arithmetic 
Commercial Geography 
Gregg Shorthand 
Rational Typewriting 



COMMERCIAL 
Adopted 

Williams & 

Williams & 

Mills 

Gano 

Moore 

Thurston 

Thompson 

Adams 



Rogers \merican Book Co. 
RogersAmerican Book Co. 

American Book Co. 

American Book Co. 

American Book Co. 

American Book Co. 

American Book Co. 

D. Appjeton Co. 

Gregg Publishing Co. 

Gregg Publishing Co. 



Com. and Industrial Geography 

Words 

Zaner Method Manual 

Speed Studies 

Graded Readings in Gregg Shorthand 

Progressive Exercises 

Practical Drills in Shorthand 

Penmanship 
Advance Practice in Gregg Shorthand 



Supplementary 

Keller & Bishop 



Ginn & Co. 
Gregg Publishing Co. 
Zaner & Bloser Co. 
Gregg Publishing Co. 
Gregg Publishing Co. 
Gregg Publishing Co. 
Gregg Publishing Co. 

Gregg Publishing Co. 



Worman's First Spanish Book 
Worman's Second Spanish Book 
Elementary Spanish Grammar 
Lecturas Faciles 
Poco a Poco 

Spanish Tales for Beginners 
Cuentos Modernos 
Spanish Dictionary 



SPANISH 



Espinosa & Allin 

Wilkins 

Hall 

Hills 

Johnson 

Appleton 



American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
Silver, Burrett & Cc 
World Book Co. 
Henry Holt Co. 
American Book Co. 
Appleton Pub. Co. 



HISTORY 



History of the United States 
Brief History of the United States 
Short History of Ancient Times 
History of the Ancient World 
Roman History 

Leading Facts of English History 
Ireland's Story 



Adopted 

Fiske 

McMaster 

Myers 

Botsford 

Morey 

Montgomery 



Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
American Book Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
The MacMillan Co. 
American Book Co. 
Ginn & Co. 



Johnston&Spencer Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 



American History 

History of the United States 

The Ancient World 

A History of Greek Art 

Greek Literature 



Supplementary 

Muzzey 

Adams & Trent 

West . 

Tarbell 

Jebb 



Ginn & Co. 
Allyn & Bacon 
Aliyn & Bacon 
MacMillan Co. 
American Book Co. 



AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 



A Short History of England Andrews 

History of the American Nation McLaughlin 

Short History of the U. S. . McLaughlin 

Readings in History of the Nation Bassctt 

Gov't of N. E. States Batler 

Manual of the Constitution Andrew 

Civil Government Martin 

New Civics Ashley 

A Short History of England Andrews 

Ancient History Webster 

Greek Leaders Hopkinson 



Allyn & Bacon 

Appleton 

Appleton 

MacMillan Co. 

Scribner 

American Book Co. 

American Book Co. 

MacMillan Co. 

Allyn & Bacon 

D. C. Heath Co. 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 



CHEMISTRY, PHYSICS AND OTHER SCIENCES 



Descriptive Chemistry 

Qualitative Analysis 

A Text Book of Physics 

First Principles of Physics 

Field, Forest and Garden Botany 

Outlines of Botany 

Plant Studies 

Plant Studies 

Practical Physiology 

Human Body 

Lessons in Astronomy 

Text Book of Geology 

Applied Physics 

Advanced Physiology and Hygiene 

General Chemistry 

Practical Physics 



Adopted 

Newell 

Irish 

Gray 

Lenvitt 

Coulter 

Hall & Bergen 

Carhart & Chute 

Meier 

Blaisdeil 

Martin 

Young 

Brigham 

Hawkins 



D. C. Heath Co. 
American Book Co. 
Henry Holt & Co. 
Allyn & Bacon 
American Book Co. 
American Book Co. 
D. Appleton & Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
Ginn & Co. 
Henry Holt & Co. 
Ginn 5; Co. 
D. Appleton & Co. 
Longmans, Green & Co. 



Conn & BudingtonSilver, Burdett & Co. 
Newell D. C. Heath & Co. 

Black & Davis MacMillan Co. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

Adopted June, 1923 

Algebra 

Wentworth's First Steps Ginn & Co. 

Arithmetic 

Morey Elementary Part I Scribner's Sons 

Morey Elementary Part II Scribner's Sons 

Morey Advanced Scribner's Sons 

Werner Mental American Book Co. 

Dictionaries 

Worcester Primary J. B. Lippincott Co. 

Worcester Comprehensive J. B. Lippincott Co. 

Geographies 

Frye's First Step in Geography Ginn & Co. 

Frye's Leading Facts of Geography, Part I Ginn & Co. 

Frye's Leading Facts of Ceography, Part II Ginn & Co. 

Frye's Grammar School Geography Ginn & Co. 

Tarr & McMurry Geography, Book I The MacMillan Co. 

Tarr & McMurry Geography, Book II The MacMillan Co. 

Tarr & McMurry Geography, Book I, Part I The MacMillan Co. 

Tarr & McMurry, Book I, Part II The MacMillan Co. 

Tarr & McMurry Geography, Book II, Part i The MacMillan Co. 

Tarr & McMurry Geography, Book II, Part II The MacMillan Co. 

Geographical Readers 

Carpenter's Africa American Book Co. 

Carpenter's Asia American Book Co. 

Carpenter's Australia American Book Co. 

Carpenter's Europe . . . American Book Co. 

Carpenter's Nort America American Book Co. 

Carpenter's South America American Book Co. 

Winslow's The Earth and Its People D. C. Heath & Co. 

Winslow's The United States D. C. Heath & Co. 

Winslow's Our American Neighbors D. C. Heath & Co. 

Winslow's Europe D. C. Heath & Co. 

Winslow's Distant Countries D. C. Heath & Co. 



74 



AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 



McDonald & Dalrymple's Little People Everywhere: 

Betty in Canada Little, Brown & Co. 

Manuel in Mexico Little, Brown & Co. 

Ume Sam in Japan Little, Brown & Co. 

Rafael in Italy Little, Brown & Co. 

Kathleen in Ireland Little, Brown & Co. , 

Fritz in Germany Little, Brown & Co. 

Gerda in Sweden Little, Brown & Co. 

Boris in Russia Little, Brown & Co. 

Donald in Scotland Little, Brown & Cc. 

Martha in Holland Little, Brown & Co. 

Hassan in Egypt Little, Brown & Co. 

Josefa in Spain Little, Brown & Co. 

Histories 

Gordy's American Scribner's Sons 

Montgomery's Leading Facts Ginn & Co. 

Scudder's American American Book Co. 

Dickson's American The MacMillan Co. 

Tappan's Our Country's Story Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Tappan's _ England's Story Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Davis' History of the U. S. for Youngest Readers Ed. Pub. Co. 

Wilson's Readers The MacMillan Co. 

Historical Readers 

Guerber's Story of the English American Book Co. 

Guerber's Stories of the Greeks American Book Co. 

Language and Grammar 

Mother Tongue, Books I and II Ginn "& Co. 

Metcalf & Rafter Series, Books I and II American Book Co. 

Aldine Language Newson & Co. 

Music Readers 

Harmonic Series American Book Co. 

Johnson's Songs of the Nation (Sets of SO) Silver, Burdett & Co. 

Spellers 

Chancellor's Graded Story The MacMillan Co. 

Reed's Word Lessons C. E. Merrill Co. 

Physiology 

Gulick Series, Good Health Ginn & Co. 

Gulick Series, Emergencies Ginn & Co. 

Gulick Series, Town and City Ginn & Co. 

Gulick Series, Body at Work . Ginn & Co. 

Gulick Series, Control of the Body and Mind :..Ginn & Co. 

Readers 

The Aldine Series Newson & Co. 

Baker & Carpenter The MacMillan Co. 

Cyr Ginn & Co. 

Gordon J D. C. Heath & Co. 

Jones Ginn & Co. 

Art Literature Atkinson, Mentzer Co. 

Howe Scribner's Sons 

Wheeler W. H. Wheeler & Co. 

Williams Choice Literature American Book Co. 

The Hiawatha Primer Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

The Wide Awake Series Little, Brown & Co. 

Child Life Series The MacMillan Co. 

Heath D. C. Heath & Co. 

The Riverside Readers Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

Free & Treadwell's Reading Literature, I and II Row, Peterson & Co. 

The Haliburton Readers, I and II D. C. Heath & Co. 

Progressive Road to Reading, I and II Silver, Burdett & Co. 

(1) Blaisdell's Boy Blue and His Family Little, Brown & Co. 

(2) Blaisdell's Polly and Dolly Little, Brown & Co. 

(3) Blaisdell's Cherry Tree Children Little, Brown & Co. 

(4) Bingham's Merry Animal Tales Little, Brown & Co. 

(5) Bryce's Fables from Afar Newson & Co. 

(6) Bryce's That's Why Stories Newson & Co. 

(8) Smith's Four Footed Friends Newson & Co. 

The eight books numbered above are to be furnished for first, second and third 
grades in sets of not more than twenty-five. 



AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 



General Literature 

Sevvell's Black Beauty Ed. Pub. Co. 

Defoe's Robinson Crusoe American Book Co. 

Masterpieces of American Literature Houghton,, Mifflin & Co. 

Hawthorn's Wonder Book Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Scudder's Fables and Folk Stories Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Hale's A Man Without a Country (Sets of 50) American Book Co. 

Brook's Story of the Old Bay State (Set of 4) Grade 9 

Coes' Founders of Our Country (Set of 4), Grade 5 Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Lucia's Story of American Discoverers for Little Americans 

(Set of 4), Grade 4 Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Stevenson's Children's Classes (Set of 10: 

Book I for Grade 3 Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Book II for Grade 4 Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Desk Books For Teachers 

Hart's Source Readers in American History The MacMillan Co. 

Page's American Poets Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Hazard's Three Years with the Poets Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Ashley's Government and Citizen Ginn & Co. 

Johnson's Ireland's Story Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Writing 

Gilman Syetem Dutton & Co. 



TEXT BOOKS ADDED TO THE LIST 

1914 

Standard Reference Work. 
Funk and Wagnalls Dictionaries. 

1915 
O'Shea & Kellog Heath Series, published by MacMillan Co. 
Business English by Davis & Lingham, published by Giim & Co. 
Office Training for Stenographers — Gregg. 
Standard Dictionary of Facts. 

1916 
Williams & Rogers, Beldings Correspondence — American Book Co. 
Young & Fields's Readers — MacMillan Co. 
Golden Rule Series — MacMillan Co. 
Story Hour Readers — American Book Co. 
See and Say Phonics — Iroquois Pub. Co. 
Brigham & McFarlane, Essentials of Geography — American Book Co. 

1917 

Oral and Written English by Potter, Jesckle and Gillctt, published by Ginn & Co. 

To take the place of Mother Tongue. 
Emerson and Bender. Grammar for optional use in ninth grades. 
Spellers — Mastery of words, Sarah Louise Arnold, published by Iroquois Publishing Co. 

These spellers to replace, as spellers are needed the Reed and the Chancellor 

spellers which are now in use. 
Readers: Everyday Classics by Baker and Thorndike, published by MacMillan Co. 
The Merrill Readers by Dyer and Brady, published by Chas. E. Merrill Co. 
The Elson Readers, by Elson Keek, published by Scott, Foresman & Co. 
The Lippincott Readers, by Homer P. Lewis, published by J. B. Lippincott Co. 
The Twin Series, by Lucy Fitch Perkins, published by Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
Bunny Rabbit's Diary by Blaisdell, published by Little, Brown & Co. 

1917 

Pretty Polly Flinders by Blaisdell, published by Little, Brown & Co. 
Old Mother West Wind by Burgess, published by Little, Brown & Co. 
For the Desk : 

Arlo by Cobb, published by the Riverside Press. 

For the Children's Hour, by Bailey, published by Milton, Bradlev Co. 

Keep Well Stories by Jones, published by J. P. Lippincott Co. 

Wonderland Stories by Lewis, published by J. P. Lippincott Co. 

The Travels of Birds by Chapman, published by D. Appleton & Co. 

1918 

Hart's School History of the nited States. 

Powell's The Spirit of Democracy. 

Watkin's The Forum of Democracy. 

Brubacker & Snyder — High School English, Book I. 



76 AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 



1919 

Practical English, by Lewis and Harris. 

Prose Literature, by Ashman. 

The Deserted Village, Eclectic Edition. 

Quentin Durward. Pocket Classics Edition. 

Oregon Trail, by Parkman, MacMillan Co. 

Inland Voyage and Travels with a Donkey. Eclectic Edition. 

Essays and Essay Writing. The Atlantic Monthly. 

Henry Esmond, Pocket Classics Edition. 

Crawford, Pocket Classics Edition. 

Two Years Before the Mast. Pocket Classics Edition. 

Pride and Prejudice. Pocket Classics Edition. 

Mill on the Floss. Pocket Classics Edition. 

The Rivals and The School for Scandal. Pocket Classics Edition. 

The Virginians, Thackaray — MacMillan Co. 

First Principals of Chemistry (Revised Edition) — Allyn & Bacon. 

1920 

Brief Business Arithemtic, by Sutton and Lenner — Allyn & Bacon. 
Durell and Arnold's Algebra— Chas. E. Merrill Co. 
Fites' History — Henry Holt & Co. 
Asheley's New Civics — MacMillan Co. 

1921 

Grammaire Elementaire, by Armand — D. C. Heath & Co. 

Mes Premiers Pas en Francais, Chapuzet and Daniels — D. C. Heath & Co. 

Lurell and Arnold's Algebra— Chas. E. Merrill & Co. 

Ward's Sentence and Theme — Scott Foresman & Co. 

Hitchcock's Junior English Book — Henry Holt & Co. 

1922 

Le Beau Pays de France, Spink — Ginn & Co. 

Sentences and Thinking, Forester — Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

Practical Exercises in English, Buehler — Harper Bros. 

Spelling Review, Lester — John A. Lester Co. 

Practice Work in English, Knight — Longmans, Green & Co. 

Modern European History, Webster — D. C. Heath & C_o. 

Business Penmanship, Mills — American Book Co. 

Questions and Problems in Chemistry — Harcourt, Brace & Co. 

School and Home Cooking, Greer — Allyn & Bacon. 

Foods and Household Management, Kinne & Cooley — MacMillan Co. 

Shelter and Clothing, Kinne & Cooley — MacMillan Co. 

Textiles and Clothing, McGowan & Waite — MacMillan Co. 

Dietetics for High Schools, Willard & Gillett— MacMillan Co. 

Bookkeeping and Accounting, McKinsey — Southwestern Pub. Co. 

Business Organization and Administratifion, DeHaas — Gregg Pub. Co. 

Science and Art of Selling, Knox — Knox Pub. Co. 

Retail Selling, Norton — Ginn & Co. 

Reporting Shortcuts, Gregg — Gregg Pub. Co. 

Advanced Dictation and Secretarial Training, Reigner — H. M. Rowe Co. 

Budget of Forms to Accompany Advanced Dictation and Secretarial Training, Reigner 

— H. M. Rowe Co. 
Classified Dictation Drills, Reigner — H. M. Rowe Co. (desk book) 
Shorthand Championship Dictation — Gregg Pub. Co. (desk book) 
Business Mathematics, Edgerton — Ronald Press. 

Word and Sentence Drills for Gregg Shorthand, Market — Gregg Pub. Co. 
Business Speller, Eldridge — American Book Co. 
Business Spelling Book, Mayne — Longmans, Green & Co. 
The Business Man's English, Bartholomew & Hurlbut — MacMillan Co. 
Economic Civics, Hughes — Allyn & Bacon. 

Exercise Book in Commercial Geography, Finley — Atkinson, Mentzer Co. 
Stories of the Day's Work, Davis & Getchell — Ginn & Co. 
The Psychology of Advertising, Knox — Knox Pub. Co. 

History of the United States, Thwaites & Kendall— Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 
Human Geography, Smith — John C. Winston Co. 
Advanced Geography, McMurry & Parkins — MacMillan Co. 
Bolenius Readers — Houghton, Mifflin Co. 

The Silent Readers, Lewis & Roland — John C. Winston Co. 
Home Life Around the World, Myrick — Houghton, Mifflin Co. 
The New Barnes Readers — Laidlaw Pub. Co. 
Junior High School Literature, Elson-Keck — Scott Foresman Co. 
The Making of Our Country, Smith Burnham — John C. Winston Co. 
History of Lowell — Cowley, Lee & Shepard. 
Practical Business^ Arithmetic, Kiggen— MacMillan Co. 
Six Correspondencia Commercial, Lauria — Silver, Burdett & Co. 



AUTHORIZED TEXT BOOKS 77 



1923 

Halleck's History of Our Country. 

The Smith-Burnham History. 

The Bourne and Benton History. 

Gordy's Stories of Early American History. 

Gordy's Stories of Later American History. 

Chapin and Arnold — English. 

Manual for the Bolenius Readers. 

Hill's Community Civics. 

Good Writing. 

Modern American and British Poets. 

Hessler's First Year of Science. 



Modern English. 

New Series Geography. 

Boys and Girls of Wakeuptown. 

Journeys to Healthland. 

Winston Companion Readers. 

Clear Type Readers. 

First French Book. 

Magee Readers. 

First Year Latin Book. 

History Stories of Other Lands. 

Elementary English. 

Cotton. 

Jura. 

The Story Key to Geographic Names. 

Vital English. 

Junior Business Training. 

American Government in 1921. 

Elementary General Science. 

Introductory Physics. 



1925 

Chemistry in Everyday Life. 

Short Stories for English Courses. 

Modern Short Stories. 

Short Stories. 

Introduction to Literature. 

Fifty Plans for Fifty Themes. 

Precis Writing for American Schools. 

Advanced Exercises in English. 

Essentials of Economics. 

Literature and Living. 

Americans All. 

Minimum Essentials of Correct Writing. 

Speaking and Writing English. 

King Arthur and His Knights. 

Candlelight Stories. 

Horn Ashbaugh Speller (experimental use). 

New Merrill Speller (experimental use). 

Tidyman Speller (experimental use). 

English for Immediate Use with Drill in Essentials. 

Modern Business Geography. 

Schorling & Clark Arithmetic (experimental use). 

Stone Arithmetic (experimetal use). 

Woodburn & Moran History (upper grades). 

Mace's History (6th grade). 

American History Story Book. 

Famous American's (5th grade). 

Choosing_ and Occupation. 

Studies in Grammar. 

Lincoln Library (reference). 

Hollis Dann Junior Song Book (supplementary). 

Milne -Downey Standard Algebra. 

Readers: 

Bobb's Merrill. 
Story Reader. 
Child's Library Reader. 
Stone's Silent Reader. 
Pathway to Reading. 



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INDEX 



Absent on Leave 61 

Administration 4 

Attendance Officers' Report 44 

Certificates Granted 68 

Continuation School 39-40 

Elections 17 

Evening and Mill Classes 42 

Evening Practical Arts Classes for Women 28-30 

Evening School Summary 43 

Evening School Teachers 62-65 

Fire and Accident Prevention 37-38 

General Statistics 7-9 

High School 19-20 

High School Athletics 35-36 

In Memoriam 18 

Junior High Schools 41 

List of Text Books 69-77 

Medical and Dental Supervision 20-21-60 

Organization of School Committee, 1925 3 

Organization of School Committee, 1926 5 

Permanent Substitutes 61 

Physical Education Report 33-35 

Pupils by Grades 19 

Receipts and Expenditures 9-12 

Receipts and Expenditures (Discussion) 13 

Resignations 16 

Retirements 16 

Report of Supervisor of Primary Grades and Kindergartens 31-32 

Roll of Day Teachers 46-60 

Salary Schedule 66-67 

School and Home Gardens 32 

School Census 14-15 

Sohoolhouses 16 

School Nurses 60 

School Physicians 61 

School Savings Banks 22 

School Hours 45 

Sight and Hearing Tests 21 

Summary of Annual Returns 78-80 

Vacations 45 

Vacation Classes 42 

Vocational School 22-30 



CITY OF LOWELL 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Ninetieth Annual Report 



OF THE 



CITY AUDITOR 




FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR 

1925 

WATSON BROS., PRINTERS ■. dBSfe. . DUTTON STREET. LOWELL 



CITY OF LOWELL 

MASSACHUSETTS 




MAYOR 
John T. Donovan 



CITY COUNCIL 
JAMES J. GALLAGHER, President 



EDWARD T. BAILEY 
ABEL R. CAMPBELL 
JOSEPH A. N. CHRETIEN 
WALTER J. CLEARY 
DANIEL COSGROVE 
A.RTHUR GENEST 
FRANCIS J. HAGGERTY 
FRANK J. HUBIN 



THOMAS F. INGLIS 
JOHN R. KIGGINS 
FRANK E. MacLEAN 
JOHN J. McPADDEN 
JOSEPH F. MONTMINY 
JOHN E. O'BRIEN 
RICHARD F. PRESTON 
ROBERT R. THOMAS 



AUDITOR'S STATEMENT 
1925 

Daniel E. Martin, City Auditor 



City of Lowell 



Lowell is situated at the confluence of the Merrimac & Concord Rivers. 

Was settled in 1653, called Chelmsford Grant. First town meeting 
in 1654. 

Was originally a part of Chelmsford. 

Owns its own water supply. 

Incorporated as a Town in 1826. 

Incorporated as a City in 1836. 

Part of Tewksbury annexed in 1834, 1847, 1898, 1906. 

Part of Dracut annexed in 1851, 1874, 1879. 

Part of Chelmsford annexed in 1826, 1874. 

Population 112,759. 

Has 226.09 miles of streets 149.30 accepted, 76.79 unaccepted. 

Has 136.33 miles of sewers. 

Has an area of 14.1 square miles. ] '* 

Assessed valuation $145,404,663.00 and 30,639 assessed polls. ' \ 

Tax rate $31.80 per $1,000.00 per cent of valuation 100. 

Bonded indebtedness, December 31, 1925, $5,894,670.00 sinking funds 
$253,600.57. 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 107 High School Teachers, 101 Junior High 
School teachers, 126 Grammar School teachers, 125 Primary School 
teachers, 33 Kindergarten teachers, 26 special teachers, 19 Substi- 
tutes, 42 Evening High teachers. 30 Evening Elementary School 
teachers, 73 Evening Vocational School teachers, 31 Day Vocational 
School teachers, 17 Americanization teachers, and 11 Continuation 
School teachers. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 218 officers and men, 178 fire alarm boxes. 
1588 hydrants, 26 fire apparatus (not including water tower.) 

WATER DEPARTMENT. Date of construction, 1870 to 1873; high 
service, 1881, driven wells, 1893 to 1919. 

Source of supply — Two hundred ten (210) driven wells in the valley 
of River Meadow Brook, and five hundred and fifty-five (555) driven 
wells at Pawtucket Boulevard. 

Mode of supply — -Pumping to reservoir and pumping direct. Filtered 
through coke and sand. 

Daily capacity 10,000,000.00 gallons; 172.61 miles main; reservoir 
capacity 5 days supply; consumed 6,184,999 gallons daily. 

PARK DEPARTMENT. 208.0933 acres of parks and playgrounds 
valued at $1023,264.00. 

Has five national banks, one trust company. 

Has seven savings banks. 

Has thre6 co-operative banks. 

Has 16 1-2 miles waterways. 

Develops about 30,000 h. p. daily by means of 6 1-2 miles of canals, 
which furnish power for manufacturing plants. 

Has the largest textile school. 

Has more than 1000 manufacturing plants. 



Sections of Ordinances of 
City of Lowell 



The financial year shall begin on the first day of January and end 
on the thirty-first day of the following December, including both days 
and all department books and accounts must be run accordingly. 

All departments and offices of the city government shall keep 
and furnish such records in book form or otherwise as shall be pre- 
scribed by the City Auditor. 

All accounts rendered to or kept in the departments of the city 
shall be subject to the inspection of the City Auditor. 

All or any city departmental officials, collecting money due the 
city for licenses, fees, fines, services rendered or for material sold or 
for any other purpose, for which no bill was previously rendered, 
shall pay all such collections over to the City Treasurer on or before 
the last day of each month. 

All bills or claims for work performed must be presented to the 
departments ordering the same; those for supplies furnished and on 
account of contracts therefor should be presented to the Purchasing 
Agent. 

All bills or claims should be received by the city on or before 
the first day of the month. 

All department receipts for materials and supplies should be 
sent to the purchasing agent on or before the third day of the month, 
as it is impossible for him to approve bills for payment in due course 
after that date. 

All bills after approval by each commissioner should be listed 
and sent to the Auditor's Department not later than the eighth day 
of each month. 

All bills or other claims, before they are finally certified by the 
City Auditor or paid shall be approved by the Mayor. 

All bills approved will be paid on the fifteenth day of each month. 



Auditing Department 



To the City Council of the City of Lowell, 
Gentlemen:- — 

Pursuant to the provisions of law made and provided, herinafter 
is submitted a report of the City Auditor of the City of Lowell, con- 
cerning all business transactions of the city during the fiscal year 
of 1925. 

Respectfully 

DAN. B. MARTIN, 

Auditor. 



Year 1925 
TAX DISTRIBUTION 

Polls at Commitment, 30,639 at $2.00 $ 61,278.00 

Polls at Supplementary, 555 at $2.00 1,110.00 

Total Tax on Polls $ 62,388.00 $ 6^388.00 

Real Property at Commitment, valuation of 

$108,262,650.00 at $31.80 per $1,000 $3,442,752.27 

Real Property at Supplementary, valuation 

of $5,350.00 at $31.80 per $1000 170.13 

Total Tax on Real Estate $3,442,922.40 $3,442,922.40 

Personal Property at Commitment, valuation 

of $37,142,013.00 at $31.80 per $1,000 $1,181,116.01 

Personal Property at Supplementary, valuation 

of $1,850.00 at $31.80 per $1,000 58.83 

Total Tax on Personal Estate $1,181,174.84 $1,181,174.84 

Total Tax $4,686,485.24 

Non-Resident Bank Tax 494.49 

Street Sprinkling Tax 25,513.13 

Moth Tax 3,122.00 

Grand Total for which Warrants were Issued to Collector $4,715,614.86 

LEVY AT THE TIME OF COMMITMENT 

City Appropriation $5,326,471.59 

Income Tax Estimate $ 271,443.62 

War Bonus Fund 55,307.70 

Estimated Receipts , 930,000.00 

$1,256,751.32 $1,256,751.32 

NET CITY APPROPRIATIONS $4,069,720.27 

State Tax $ 297,240.00 

State Highway Tax :?, 3,981.83 

State Auditing Tax 2,293.48 

Investigation of Sewerage in Merrimack 

River 4,586.28 

Investigation of Sewerage in Concord River 2,375.49 

TOTAL STATE LEVY $ 310,477.08 $ 310,477.08 

COUNTY TAX 226,403.35 

Total up to Overlay $4,606,600.70 

OVERLAY 78,545.58 

TOTAL CITY TAX $4,685,146.28 

Non-Resident Bank Tax 494.49 

Street Sprinkling Tax 25,513.13 

Moth Tax 3,122.00 



Warrants issued to Collector $4,714,275.90 



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BALANCE SHEET— December 31, 1925 

Dr. Revenue Cr. 

296,476.24 Revenue Cash 

239.00 Taxes 1922 Poll 



1922 Personal 

1923 Poll 

1923 Personal 

1923 Real Estate . 

1924 Poll 

1924 Personal 

1924 Real Estate 

1925 Poll 

1925 Personal 

1925 Real Estate , 



1,283.78 

39,879.00 

44,153.34 

335.00 

16,677.00 

33,591.10 

3,927.83 

26,116.00 

246,451.21 

1,137,937.80 

12.45 Moth Tax 1922 

2.55 Moth Tax 1923 

2.60 Moth Tax 1924 

841.60 Moth Tax 1925 

26.38 Sprinkling 1922 

27.74 " 1923 

15.64 -.» " 1924 

9,161.34 " 1925 

10 249.36 Excise Tax 

10,626.24 Tax Titles 

5.267.42 Sidewalk Assessment 

6,452.15 Sewer Assessment 

168,660.35 Departmental Accts. Rec 

3,755.00 Com. of Mass. State Aid 

1,423.25 Com. of Mass. Mil. Aid 

10,012.47 Cemetery Accounts Rec 

7,268.63 Water Accts. Receivable 

49,731.27 Water Works Deficit 

Revenue Appropriations $ 87,867.59 

Temporary Loans 1,800,000.00 

Overlay 1921 2 079.28 

2.035.43 " 1922 

70.DO " 1923 

" 1924 41,151.91 

" 1925 67,490.97 

Cemetery Revenue 10,012.47 

Water Revenue 7,268.63 

Prior Revenue 102,123.60 

Premiums 2,995.87 

Sidewalk Revenue 5,267.42 

Sewer Revenue 6,452.15 

$2,132,709.89 $2,132,709.89 

NON REVENUE 

$ 41,764.71 Non Revenue Cash 

Non Revenue Appropriation .... $ 97,264.71 

55,500.00 Loans Authorized 



97,264.71 $ 97,264.71 



BALANCE SHEET— Continued— December 31, 1925 



INDEBTEDNESS 



Sinking Funds 
Cash and Securities 



Funded Debt 



New School House 

Fund $ 253,600.57 

Net Bonded Debt 5,694,670.00 



New Schoolhouse 

Loan $ 200,000.00 

Par Value 

Surplus New 

School House ... 

Sinking Fund 53,600.57 



$ 253,600.57 



4 % $1,165,020.00 

4Vi% 1,264,200.00 

4%% 1,196,450.00 

4%% 307,000.00 

5 % 1,477,000.00 

5V4% 42,000.00 

5%% 241,000.00 

6 % 2,000.00 



$5,694,670.00 
$5,948,270757777 ~ ~~ $5,9487270757 

TRUST FUNDS 

Cash and Securities....$ 378,686.91 Carney Medal Fund....$ 200.00 

Carney Medal Fund 

Income 16.66 

Cemetery Perpetual 

Care Fund 210,987.22 

John Davis Library 

Fund 106,200.00 

Thomas Nesmith Fund 25,000.00 
Joseph Henry Stack- 
pole Fund 1,000.00 

Jonathan Tyler Fund 10.000.00 
Hapgood Wright Fund 8,343.79 

Hapgood Wright Fund 

Income 7,758.24 

Unpaid Debt and In- 
terest 9,181.00 

$ 378,686791 $ _ 378T686791 

PROPERTY 
Dr. Cr. 

$2,237,226.67 Water Works 

4,,360,590.00 Schools 

5,080,527.42 General Departments 

City of Lowell (Balancing Account) $11,678,344.09 

$11,678,344709 $11,678,344.09 



CITY OF LOWELL, DECEMBER 31, 1925 



THE MUNICIPAL DEBT 



Gross Debt 



Total Ordinary Debt December 31, 1925 $5,637,920.00 

Total Water Works Debt December 31 1925 256,750.00 

Total Temporary Loan December 31, 1925 1,800 000.00 



Total Gross Debt December 31, 1925 $7,694,670.00 



Net City Debt 

Total Ordinary Debt January' 1, 1925 $5,828,690.00 

Sinking Fund 200,000.00 

Net Debt January 1, 1925 $5,628,690.00 

Payments on Ordinary Debt Jan.-Dec. inclusive 546,770.00 

Total 1925 $5,081,920.00 

Loans, Negotiated 1925 356,000.00 

Net Debt December 31, 1925 $5,437,920.00 



Net Water Debt 

Total Ordinary Water Debt, January 1, 1925 $ 209,750.00 

Payments on Water Works Debt, Jan.-Dec. inclusive 28,000.00 

Total December 31, 1925 $ 181,750.00 

Loan negotiated 1925 75,000.00 

Net Debt December 31, 1925 $ 256,750.00 



Total Net City and Water Debt December 31, 1925 

City $5,437,920.00 

Water 256,750.00 

Total $5,694,670.00 



DEBT LIMIT, 1925 

Total Ordinary Debt, December 31, 1925 $5,637,920.00 

Total Water Works Debt, December 31, 1925 256,750.00 

Total Tax Revenue Loans, December 31, 1925 1,800,000.00 

Total Gross Debt, December 31, 1925 $7 694,670.00 

Water $ 256,750.00 

Special Legislation 2,623,200.00 

Temporary Loans 1,800,000.00 

■ $4,679,950.00 



City Debt as relates to Limit of Indebtedness $3,014,720.00 



Limit of Municipal Debt for 1925 $3,374,946.52 

City Debt as relates to Limit 3,069,720.00 

Distance from Limit December 31, 1925 $ 305,226.52 

Distance from Limit January 1 1925 305,206.52 

1925 LOANS NEGOTIATED 

Macadam Pavement $ 70,500.00 

Paving— Bridge Street 25,000.00 

Paving — Lakeview Avenue 25,000.00 

Paving— Permanent 105,000.00 

Paving— Stevens Street 10,000.00 

Playground— John J. O'Donnell 6,000.00 

School— New High 24,500.00 

Sewer Additional 50,000.00 

Sewer Construction 40,000,00 

Water Main 75,000.00 

LOANS AUTHORIZED 

Macadam Additional $ 55,000.00 

New High School 500.00 

RECAPITULATION OF 1925 LOANS 

Borrowed inside limit of Indebtedness $ 350,000.00 

Borrowed outside limit of Indebtedness 81,000.00 

Total $ 431,000.00 

New High School 

Total authorized loans $2,050,000.00 

Balance not yet negotiated 500.00 



CLASSIFICATION OF 

Receipts and Payments 

BY SCHEDULES 
Year 1925 



l : 



14 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

RECEIPTS 



1 


Revenue | Offsets 




SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 


for for 
Expenses | Outlays 


Total 


GENERAL REVENUE 


1 




Taxes 


1 




Current Year 






Property 


"3,229.162.421 




Poll 


36,272.00| 




Previous Years 






Property- 


1.120,922.731 




Poll 


14,793.00| 




Prom the State 






Corporation 


488,815.101 




Street Railway 


4,783.641 




Bank 


4.957.01| 




Income 


342,813.62| 




Total from Taxes 


^5,242,519 52! 


$5,242,519.52 


LICENSES & PERMITS 






Licenses 






Liquor 


$ 90.001 




All Other 


14,906.501 




Permits 






Marriage 


928.00| 


1 


Total from Lie. & Permits 


5 15,924.50| 


$ 15,924.50 


FINES AND FORFEITS 


| | 




Court 


$ 30,002.84! 


| 


Total from Pines & Forfeits 


$ 30,002.84| 


$ 30,002.84 


GRANTS AND GIFTS 






From County (Dog Li- 






censes), for Schools or 






Libraries 


$ 4,477.27) 


1 


Total from Grants & Gifts 


$ 4,477.271 


$ 4,477.27 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

RECEIPTS 



15 







Revenue | Offsets 


. 


SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 




for | for 
Expenses Outlays 


Total 


COMMERICAL REVENUE 








Special Assessments 








Street Sprinkling 


$ 


25,269.81| 




Moth Extermination 




3,504.80 




Sewers 




12,211.23 




. Sidewalks and Curbing 




10,207.57| 




Total from Special Assess- 








ments 


$. 


51,193.41| 


$ 51,193.41 


DEPARTMENTAL 








General Government 








Financial 








Treasurer 


$ 


3,288.381 




License Commissioners 




20.00| 




Other Finance Offices and 








Accounts 




200.25| 




Other General Departments 








City or Town Clerk 




2,514.01| 




Buildings 




144.34| 




Other General Departments 




12.85| 




Total from General Govern- 








ment 


$ 


6,179.83| 


$ 6,179.83 


PROTECTION PERSONS 








AND PROPERTY 








Police Department 








Service of Officers 


$ 


125.001 




Fire Department 








Miscellaneous 




431.50| 




Inspection 








Inspection of Wires 




546.84| 




Sealing of Weights and 








Measures 




1,540.96| 




Forestry 








Insect Pest Extermination 




97.75| 




Total Protection Persons 








. and Property 


$ 


2,742. 05| 


$ 2,742.05 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 



Revenue 

for 
Expenses 



Offsets 

for 
Outlays 



HEALTH & SANITATION 

Health 

Miscellaneous 

Sanitation 

Refuse and Garbage Dis- 
posal 
Sewer Connections 

Other Health and Sanitation 
Comfort Station 

Total from Health and San. 
ita'don 



$ 15,488.18 



3,545.25 
1,088.66 

680.31 



HIGHWAYS 
General 
Total from Highways 

CHARITIES 

Almshouse or Town Farm 

a. Sale of Stock 

b. Board 

Reimbursements for Relief 
Given 

a. From Individuals 

b. From Other Cities and 
Towns 

c. From the State 

Reimbursements for Mothers' 
Aid 

a. From Individuals 

b. From Other Cities and 
Towns 

c. From the State 
Miscellaneous 

Total from Charities 



$ 20,802.40 



820.89 



820.89 



1804.44 



269.00 

12,630.31 
20.559.69 



2,088.69 

166,834.00 

474.68 



$ 20,802.40 



820.89 



$ 204,660.81[ 



$ 204,660.81 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



17 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 



Revenue | Offsets 

for | for 

Expenses | Outlays 



SOLDIERS' BENEFITS 












State Aid 
Military Aid 
Soldiers' Burials 
Soldiers' Relief 


$ 


4,665.0( 

2,428. 5( 

60.0C 

149.0C 


>j 
1 

| 
| 


$ 




Total from Soldiers' Bene- 
fits 


$ 


7,302.50 


1 


7,302.50 


SCHOOLS 












Tuition 

Sale of Text Books and 

Supplies 

Miscellaneous 


1 


25,214.48 

1,242.47 
83,252.81 




$ 




Total from Schools 


r 


109,709.76 




109,709.76 


LIBRARIES 












Fines, Rentals, and Sales 


i 


1,007.88 




$ 




Total from Libraries 


$ 


1,007.88 




1,007.88 


RECREATION 












Parks and Gardens 
Celebrations and Entertain- 
ments 


*. 


6,749.94 
1,361.98 




$ 




Total from Recreation 


$ 


8,111.92 




8,111.92 


UNCLASSIFIED 






- 






Receipts not Recorded under 
Previous Classifications 

a. Auditorium 

b. Insurance 


$ 


15,236.25 
142.06 








Total from Unclassified 


$ 


15,378.31| | 


$ 


15,378.31 



18 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 



Revenue 


Offsets 


for 


for 


Expenses 


Outlays 



Total 



PUBLIC SERVICE 
ENTERPRISES 

Water 

a. Income from Sale of 
Water 

b. Miscellaneous 
Ml Other 

a. Public Scales 

Total from Public Servicel 
Enterprises 

CEMETERIES 

Sale of Lots and. Graves 
Care of Lots and Graves 
Care of Endowed Lots (In- 
terest on Funds) 
Miscellaneous 

Total from Cemeteries 

INTEREST 

On Deposits 
On Deferred Taxes 
On Deferred Special Assess- 
ments 
On Public Trust Funds 

a. Schools — Carney Medal 

b. Library 

c. All Other 

Total from Interest 

MUNICIPAL INDEBTED 
NESS 

Loans in Anticipation of 

Revenue 

Loans for General Purposes 

Loans for Public Service 

Enterprises 

Premiums 

Total from Municipal In- 
debtedness 



359,050.85 
15,495.43 

86.40 



$ 374,632.68 



4,257.00 
9,280.25 

14 605.00 
7,029.23 



$ 35,171.48 



11,432.56 
36,358.41 

317.30 

9.09 
4,749.76 
1,669.46 



$ 54,536.58 



$ 12,438.04 



$ 12,438.04 



$ 387,070.72 



$ 35,171.48 



$ 54,536.58 



,700,000.00 
356,000.00 

75,000.00 
3,465.87 



134,465.87 



$5,134,465.87 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 
RECEIPTS 



19 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 


for 
Expenses 


1 

1 


fox 
Outlays 


1 


Total 


AGENCY, TRUST, AND IN 
VESTMENT TRANS- 
ACTIONS 












Civilian War Poll Tax 
Trust 
Perpetual Care Funds 
Private Trust Funds and 
Accounts 


: 


1 i 


9,669.00| 

10,600.00| 

45.50| 
1 


$ 




Total from Agency, Trust, 
and Investment Transac- 
tions 




i 
$ 


1 
20.314.50j 


20,314.50 


REFUNDS 












General Departments 
Accrued Interest 




$ 


4,033.08| 
732.90| 

I 


$ 




Total Refunds 




$ 


4,765.98| 


4,765.98 


TRANSFERS 












Departmental 
Tax Titles 




$ 


166,685.53| 
713.21J 


$ 




Total Transfers 


■ 


$ 


1 
167,398.74| 


167,398.74 


BALANCES 






1 






General 

Other Public Trust Funds 


! 


$ 


372,039.86| 

849.08 

i 


$ 




Total Cash on Hand Begin- 
ning of Year 




$ 


1 
372,888.94| 


372,888.94 


Grand Total Receipts and 
Cash on Hand 






| $11,897,446.70 



20 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses 


| Outlays | Total - 


DEPARTMENTAL 






General Government 






Legislative 
Council 

a. Salaries and Wages 

b. Other Expenses 


$ 7,900.00 
694.16 




Executive 
Mayor 

a. Salaries and Wages 

b. Other Expenses 


11,812.00 
2 076.26 




Financial 
Auditor 

a. Salaries and Wages 

b. Other Expenses 


10,258.54 
5,400.21 


| 


Treasurer and Collector 

a. Salaries and Wages 

b. Other Expenses 


19,200.77 
9,126.78 


I 

! 

i 


Civic Employment 

a. Salaries and Wages 

b. Other Expenses 


1,800.00 
24.30 


1 , 


Assessors 

a. Salaries and Wages 

b. Other Expenses 


25,603.57 
3,869.44 


1 i 


License Commissioners 

a. Salaries and Wages 

b. Other Expenses 
Other General Departments 


5,200.00 
149.76 


i 


Law 

a. Salaries and Wages 

b. Other Expenses 


8,651.39 
2,642.74 




City or Town Clerk 

a. Salaries and Wages 

b. Other Expenses 


10,922.00 
1,786.88 




City Messenger 

a. Salaries and Wages 

b. Other Expenses 


2,400.00 
71.62 





CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



21 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses | Outlays 


1 Total 


Public Service Commission 






a. Salaries and Wages 


3,000.00| 




b. Other Expenses 


473.491 




Engineering 






a. Salaries and Wages 


8,804.711 




b. Other Expenses 


1,281.10| 




Superintendent of Buildings 






a. Salaries and Wages 


2,796. 77| 




b. Other Expenses 


2.056.281 




Election and Registration 






a. Salaries and Wages 


31,738.641 




b. Other Expenses 


19,174. 15| 




Civil Service Registrar 






a. Salaries and Wages 


1 000.00| 




b. Other Expenses 


98.55! 




Budget and Auditing 






Commission 






a. Salaries and Wages 


1,500.001 




b. Other Expenses 


266.24| 




Purchasing Agent 






a. Salaries and Wages 


9,522.50| 




b. Other Expenses 


2,376.16| 




Municipal Buildings 






City or Town Hall 






a. Salaries and Wages 


20,093.10| 




b. Other Expenses 


6,714.54) 




Total for Gen. Government 


$ 240,486.65) 


$ 240,486.65 


PROTECTION OF PER. 






SONS AND PROPERTY 






Police Department 




• 


Salaries and Wages 


$ 334,847.02| 




Equipment, Maintenance 






Repairs 


1,648.69| 




Fuel and Light 


2,027.40 




Maintenance of Buildings 






and Grounds 


199.30| 




Other Expenses 


4,139.52| | 





22 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses 


Outlays 


Total 


Fire Department 
Salaries and Wages 
Equipment, Maintenance, 
and Repairs 
New Equipment 
Fuel and Light 
Maintenance of Buildings 
and Grounds 
Other Expenses 


385,680.95 

17,316.33 

10458.44 

3,620.55 
2,991.20 


$ 


49,835.54 




Militia 
Rifle Range 


1,523.79 








Inspection 
Inspection of Buildings 
Inspection of Wires 
Sealing of Weights and 
Measures 


146,897.19 
4,936.44 

8,891.30 








Forestry 

Insect Pest Extermination 
Planting and Trimming 
Trees (included in Park 
App'n) 


8,116.98 
4,466.54 








Other Protection of Persons 
and Property 

Fish Wardens 

Pound Keeper 


150.00 
5.00 








Total for Protection of 
Persons and Property 


$ 937,916.04 


$ 


49,835.54 


$ 987,752.18 


HEALTH AND SANITATION 










Health 
General Administration 
Quarantine and Contagious 
Disease Hospitals 
Tuberculosis 
Vital Statistics 
Other Expenses 


$ 6,839.33 

68,458.46 

10,133.81 

971.90 

27,534.33 


$ 


5,000.00| 




Inspection 

a. School Hygiene 

b. Inspection of Animals 

c. Inspection of Meat and 
Provisions 


26,477.94 
600.00 

1,204.00 












CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



23 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Fxpenses 


Outlays 


1 Total 


d. Inspection of Milk and 








Vinegar 


6,795.72| 






e. Smoke Inspection 


500.001 






Sanitation 








Sewer Maintenance and 








Operation 


26,974.991 






Sewer Construction 




138,844.74 




Refuse and Garbage 








Disposal 


175,748.24| 






Street Cleaning 


48,105.21] 






Other Health and Sanitation 








Sanitaries and Public Con- 








venience Stations 


11,108.83| 


52.80 




Total for Health and Sani- 








tation 


$ 411,452.76| $ 


143,897.54 


$ 555,350.30 


HIGHWAYS 








General Administration 


$ 12,372.10] 






General Highway Expendi- 








tures 


222,875.01] 






Construction 


1 $ 


358,999.00 




Sidewalks and Curbing 


3,855.97] 


18,867.08 




Snow and Ice Removal 


43,299.38 






Sprinkling 


1 






a. Water 


17,356.90] 






b. Other 


17,246.16| 






Lighting 


165,411.32| 






Other Expenses 








Bridge Repairs 


12,557.23| 






Reinforcing Central St. 


3,317.24 






State Highway Tax 


3,981.83 






Insurance 


1,157.70| 






Total for Highways 


$ 503,430.84| $ 


377,866.08 


$ 881,296.92 


CHARITIES 








General Administration 


$ 7,140.49| 






Almshouse or Town Farm 


123,774.97 






Outside Relief by City or 








Town 


221,506.00| 






Relief given by Other Cities 


1 






and Towns 


4,561.731 







24 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 




Expenses 


| Outlays Total 


Mothers' Aid 










a. Relief given by City or 










Town 




101,491.16 






b. Relief given by Other 










Cities and Towns 




1,926.49 






Other Expenses 




381.92 






Total for Charities 


$ 


460,782.76 




$ 460,782.76 


SOLDIERS' BENEFITS 










General Administration 


$ 


5,021.21 






State Aid 




4,128.00 






Military Aid 




3,247.00 






Soldiers' Burials 




111.00 






Soldiers' Relief 




34,375.68 






Soldiers' Graves 




1,239.62 






Total for Soldiers' Benefits 


$ 


48,122.51 




$ 48,122.51 


SCHOOLS 










General Expenses 










a. Administrative Salaries 


$ 


6,000.00 






b. Other General Salaries 




18,753.68 






c. Other General Expenses 




4,189.88 






Teachers' Salaries 


1,01 






Text Books and Supplies 




26,276.30 






Transportation 




3,026.95 






Support of Truants 




886.57 






Janitors' Services 




152,887.30 






Fuel and Light 




55,265.60 






Maintenance of Buildings 










and Grounds 




17,796.33 






New Buildings 






$ 25,637.12 




Furniture and Furnishings 




5,083.47 






Other Expenses 




126,895.48 






Smith-Hughes 




9,667.02 






Textile School 




10,000.00 






Total for Schools 


$1,441,450.15 


$ 25,637.12 


$1,467,087.27 


LIBRARIES 










Salaries and Wages 


$ 


22,093.56 






Books, Periodicals', etc. 




1898.87 


1 




Binding 




2,939.54 


j 




Fuel and Light 




918.001 


1 





CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



25 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses 


Outlays 


I Total 


Other Expenses 


1 
3,012.53| 






John Davis Fund — Books 


4,594.97| 






Total for Libraries 


$ 35,457.471 




$ 35,457.47 


RECREATION 








General Administration 








a. Salaries and Wages 


$ 5,005.00| 






b. Other Expenses 


233.331 






Parks and Gardens 








a. Salaries and Wages 


27,598.20| 






b. Improvements and Addi- 








tions 




$ 32,676.02 




c. Other Expenses 


15,546.89| 






Playgrounds and Gymnasia 








a. Salaries and Wages 


8, 667.46| 






b. Improvements and Addi- 








tions 




73,316.79 




c. Other Expenses 


2,996.10| 






Celebrations and Entertain- 








ments 








a. Fourth of July 


1,486.00| 






b. Labor Day 


988.00J 






c. Band Concerts 


975.00 






d. All Other 


34.00 






e. Boys' Week 


367.25| 






f. Lowell Centennial Cele- 








bration 


1,032.10| 






g. Defense Day 


34.94| 
$ 64,964.27) 


$ 105,992.81 




Total for Recreation 


$ 170,957.08 


PENSIONS 








Retirement made from: 








a. City Hall 


$ 560.04| 






b. Police 


11.797.87J 






c. Fire 


19.705.09 






d. Buildings 


260.04J 






e. Street 


1,784.561 






f. School 


942.00| 






g. Water 


1,693. 64| 

1 






Total for Pensions 


$ 36.743.24j 


| 


$ 36,743.24 



26 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


1 Expenses 


Outlays | 


Total 


UNCLASSIFIED 








Damages to Persons and 


. 






Personal Property 


$ 1, 572.52| 






Memorial Day 


4,216.771 






City and Town Clocks 


116.67| 






Ice for Drinking Fountains 


216.27 






Payments not Recorded undei 








Previous Classifications 








a. Binding City or Town 








Reports 


575.00| 






b. Auditorium 


37,032.36 






c. Planning Board 


435.50| 






d. Workmen's Compensa- 








tion 


6,545.41| 






e. Durkee House 


1 $ 


40.50| 




f. Miscellaneous 


7, 086.33[ 


i 




Total for Unclassified 


$ 57,796.83| $ 


40.50|' $ 


57,837.33 


PUBLIC SERVICE 








ENTERPRISES 








Water 








a. Maintenance and Opera- 








tion 


$ 350,323.26| 






b. Construction 


1 $ 


74,709.37| 




All Other 








a. Public Scales 


1,423.00| 






Total for Public Service 








Enterprises 


$ 351,746.26| $ 


74,709.37| $ 


426,455.63 


CEMETERIES 








Maintenance 


$ 34,419.40| 






Total for Cemeteries 


$ 34,419.40| 


1 $ 


34,419.40 


INTEREST 








On Temporary Loans 


$ 81,200.001 






On Loans for General Pur- 








poses 


264,292.56| 






On Loans for Public Service 








Enterprises 


8,340.001 






All Other 


11.G4J 







Total for Interest 



| 353,843.60| 



$ 353,843.60 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



27 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 




Expenses 


Outlays 


Total 


MUNICIPAL INDEBTED- 
NESS 










Loans in Anticipation of 
Revenue 

Bonds & Notes from Sink- 
ing Funds 

a. General 

b. Public Service Enter- 
prises 






$4,500,000.00 

546,770.00 
28,000.00 




Total for Municipal Indebt- 
edness 






$5,074,770.00 


$5,074,770.00 


SINKING FUNDS 










From Taxes, Earnings, etc. 


$ 


4,000.00 
20.00 


J 


, 


Total for Sinking Funds 


$ 


4,020.00 




$ 4,020.00 


AGENCY, TRUST AND IN- 
VESTMENT TRANS- 
ACTIONS 










Agency 

Taxes 

a. State 

b. Non-resident bank 

c. County 

Liquor Licenses Remitted 
to the State 
All Other 






$ 297,240.00 

1,557.24 

226,403.35 

5.00 
7,584.18 




Trust 
Perpetual Care Funds 
Other Permanent Public 
Trust Funds 
Civilian War Poll Tax 






10,600.00 

2,518.54 
9,669.00 




Total for Agency, Trust, 
and Investment Transac- 
tions 




$ 555,577.31 


$ 555,577.31 



28 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS | Expenses 


1 


Outlays 


Total 


REFUNDS 










Taxes 

Special Assessments 

General Departments 




$ 


1,159.19| 
216.88| 
175.411 




Total Refunds 




$ 


1,551.48| $ 


1,551.48 


TRANSFERS 










Departmental 




$ 


166,685.53| 




Total Transfers 




$ 


166,685.53| $ 


166,685.53 


BALANCES 










General 

Other Public Trust Fund 




$ 


338,240.95| 
9.09| 




Total Cash on Hand End of 
Year 




I 


338250.04| $ 


338,250.04 


Grand Total Payments and 
Cash on Hand 


| $11,897,446.70 



Financial Statement 

Of The 
CITY OF LOWELL, MASS. 



BALANCES 
APPROPRIATIONS 
CASH RECEIPTS 
TRANSFERS 
PAYMENTS 

January 1, 1925 — December 31, 1925 



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CLASSIFICATION OF 

Departmental Expenses 
Revenue 



40 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

ANIMAL INSPECTION 

Appropriation $ 600.00 

Expended 

Salary: 

To W. A. Sherman, Inspector $ 600.00 

ANNUITIES 

Appropriation $ 1,500.00 

Expended 

To Aline Bisaillon $ 500.00 

Mrs. Edward J. Cunningham ...-. 500.00 

Grace L. Foss 500.00 

$ 1,500.00 

ASHES AND WASTE 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 100,031.20 

Expended 

To Labor k % 98,935.20 

Returned to Treasury 1,096.00 

% 100,031.20 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 18,018.40 

Expended 

For Advertising and Printing $ 167.93 

Auto and Expenses 848.44 

Equipment 567.25 

Hardware 697.11 

Harness and Stable Supplies 913.93 

Horse Feed 5,418.05 

Laundry 317.75 

New Horses 4,550.00 

Teaming, Use of Horses 2,466.85 

Telephone 24.95 

Veterinary Services 104.00 

All other Expenses 125.85 

% 16,202.11 

Returned to Treasury 1,816.29 

% 18,018.40 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 41 

ASSESSORS 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 25,630.00 



Expended 

To Wilfred J. Achin $ 2,800.00 

James E. Donnelly 2 800.00 

John H. Dwyer 2,800.00 

Permanent Clerks 9,856.77 

Temporary Clerks 4,634.50 

Assistant Assessors 2,712.30 

$ 25,603.57 

Returned to Treasury 26.43 

$ 25,630.00 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 3,870.00 



Expended 

For Advertising $ 165.15 

Auto and Expenses 2,068.42 

Office Expenses 633.37 

Printing and Binding 868.35 

All Other Expenses 134.15 

$ 3,869.44 

Returned to Treasury .56 

$ 3,870.00 



AUDITING DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 10,400.00 

Expended 

To Dan. E. Martin, Auditor $ 3,500.00 

Clerks 6,758.54 

$ 10,258.54 

Returned to Treasury 141.46 

$ 10,400.00 



42 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

Auditing Department — Continued 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 2.500.00 

Expended 

For Advertising $ 35.85 

Binding 128.25 

Monthly Report 1,057.90 

Office Expenses 475.45 

Printing 615.40 

All Other Expenses '. 178.88 

$ 2,491.73 

Returned to Treasury ..;" 8.27 

, $ 2,500.00 

AUDITORIUM MAINTENANCE 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $, 19,000.00 

Expended 

To Clerical Services and Labor $ 18,474.62 

? 18,474.62 

Returned to Treasury 525.38 

$ 19,000.00 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 15,000.00 

Expended 

For Advertising $ 79.15 

Electrical Repairs 208.82 

Equipment Repairs 3,470.46 

Fuel 1,905.02 

Furniture and Furnishings 816.06 

Janitors' Supplies 367.81 

Lighting 2,188.36 

New Equipment 4,936.88 

Office Expense 209.44 

Organ Repairs 62.14 

Telephone 113.60 

All Other 184.30 

$ 14,542.04 

Returned to Treasury 457.96 

$ 15,000.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 43 

BAND CONCERTS 

Appropriation $ 1,000.00 

Expended 

For Music $ 975.00 

Returned to Treasury 25.00 

$ 1,000.00 



BRIDGES— BEAVER BROOK 

Appropriation $ 21,000.00 

Expended 

For Engineering Services $ 3,337.13 

Services of Assistants 613.41 

All Other 18.88 

$ 3,969.42 

$ 3,969.42 
Balance to 1926 17,030.58 

$ 21,000.00 



BRIDGES— CENTRALVILLE 

Appropriation $ 42,000.00 

Expended 

Wages: 
To Labor $ 1,002.27 

Other Expenses: 

For Concrete , 1,964.66 

Contract 18,080.72 

Investigation and Report 2,500.00 

Printing 12.80 

Services of Assistants 2,050.81 

All Other 35.40 

$ 25,646.66 

Balance to 1926 16,353.34 



$ 42,000.00 



44 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

BRIDGE REPAIRS 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 3,500.00 

Expended 

To Labor $ 3 500.00 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 2,500.00 

Expended 

For Equipment % 2,013.22 

Lumber 23.59 

Services of Assistants 416.00 

All Other 47.19 

$ 2,500.00 



BRIDGE REPAIRS— SPECIAL 

Appropriation $ 8,500.00 

Expended 

Wages: 

To Labor $ 874.32 

Other Expenses: 

For Equipment and Repairs 1,813.65 

Hardware 24.64 

Lumber 3,146.64 

Services of Assistants 697.98 

$ 6,557.23 

Balance to 1926 1,942.77 

S 8,500.00 



BUDGET AND AUDITING COMMISSION 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 1,500.00 

Expended 

Salaries: 

To Tyler A. Stevens, Albert Bergeron and 

John J. Flannery $ 1,500.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 45 

Budget and Auditing Commission — Continued 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 150.00 

Expended 

For Office Supplies $ 141.24 

Printing 5.00 

$ 146.24 

Returned to Treasury 3.76 



150.00 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 104,986.22 

Expended 

Salaries: 

To John E. Moynahan, Supt. of Public Bldgs. $ 2 796.77 

Clerical Services 4,580.37 

All Other Salaries and Labor 97,306.48 

Pension 260.04 

$ 104,943.66 

Returned to Treasury 42.56 

$ 104,986.22 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 53,872.96 

Expended 

For Auto and Expenses $ 3,393.63 

Electrical Work 5,381.31 

Fuel, Light and Power 1,029.13 

Hardware 1,868.44 

Heating 3,687.17 

Janitors' Supplies 211.94 

Lumber 7,452.18 

Mason Work 6,855.66 

Metal Work . 1,065.70 

Office Expenses 597.65 

Paint and Stock 4,572.31 



46 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

Building Department — Continued 

Piping 11.631.48 

Roofing 3,224.84 

Staging 824.90 

Transportation 1,490.53 

All Other 544.22 

$ 53,831.09 

Returned to Treasury 41.8.7 

$ 53,872.96 

BUILDINGS— SPECIAL 

Appropriation $ 9,500.00 

Expended 

Salaries: 

To Labor $ 5,911.97 

Other Expenses: 

For Hardware 61.29 

Heating 1,300.03 

Lumber 1,517.94 

Mason Work 295.25 

Office Expense 45.36 

Piping 27.30 

Roofing : 116.43 

Transportation 65.00 

All Other 40.69 

$ 9,381.26 

Returned to Treasury 118.74 

$ 9,500.00 

CEMETERIES 

Balance from 1924 $ 4,516.32 

Receipts Year 1925 35,252.98 

$ 39,769.30 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages: 

To Thomas Duckworth, Supt. of Edson 

Cemetery $ 2,309.88 

Other Salaries and Labor 26,846.10 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 47 

Cemeteries — Continued 

Other Expenses: 

For Auto Expenses 172.47 

Cinders, Stone, etc 523.62 

Fertilizer.. Loam, Plants 1,099.07 

Fuel and Light 250.92 

Hardware and Equipment 813.66 

Land 1,105.00 

Office Expenses 225.83 

Repairs 284.72 

Stable Expense 388.06 

Taxes 171.00 

Water 85.24 

All Other 179.83 

— $ 34,455.40 

Balance to 1925 5,313.90 



$ 39,769.30 



CHELMSFORD STREET HOSPITAL 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 51,600.00 

Expended 

To John J. O'Connell, Supt $ 1,235.62 

Dominick F. Molloy, successor to 

Mr. O'Connell 223.01 

Michael A. Tighe, City Physician 1,400.00 

All Other Services 48,664.35 

$ 51,522.98 

Returned to Treasury 77.02 



$ 51,600.00 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 69,459.98 

Expended 

For Auto Expenses $ 1,148.76 

Dental and Medical Services 793.60 

Dry Goods, Clothing 2,915.74 

Farm Impliments, Fertilizer, Feed 580.61 

Fuel and Light 11,687.94 



48 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



Chelmsford St. Hospital — Continued 

Furniture and Furnishings 237.70 

Groceries and Provisions 34,514.94 

Hardware 206.68 

Harnesses, Stable Supplies and Shoeing .... 809.25 

Hay, Grain, etc 3.060.33 

Hospital Supplies — Drugs and Medicine .... 2 320.11 

Household Supplies — Equipment 3.937.8E 

Office Supplies and Printing 288.44 

Refuse 157.00 

Repairs 1,051.74 

Taxes 118.56 

Transportation 164.60 

Water and Ice 3,800.79 

All Other 134.15 

\ 

Returned to Treasury 



-$ 67,928.79 
1,531.19 

$ 69,459.98 



CITY HALL 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 120,775.00 

Expended 

Wages : 

To Engineers and Firemen $ 7,703.71 

Elevator Service 1,618.21 

Janitors 5,049.50 

Matrons 5,721.68 

Pension 560.04 

$ 20,653.14 

Returned to Treasury 121.86 

$ 20,775.00 
Appropriation — Epenses and Supplies $ 6,725.00 

Expended 

For City Hall Clock Expenses $ 109. 5l 

City Hall Tower Repairs 179.35 

Fuel 2,739.98 

Furniture 604.49 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 49 

City Hall — Continued 

Ice 216.27 

Janitors' Supplies 525.56 

Lighting 1,261.33 

Maintenance Buildings and Grounds 487.89 

Transportation 27.20 

Water 430.12 

All Other Expenses 143.12 

— $ 6,724.81 

Returned to Treasury .19 

$ 6,725.00 

CIVIC EMPLOYMENT 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 1,800.00 

Expended 

Salary: 

Cornelius Cronin, Superintendent $ 1,800.00 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 25.00 

Expended 

For Office Supplies $ 14.20 

Telephone 10.10 

$ 24.30 

Returned to Treasury .70 

$ 25.00 

CLAIMS 

Appropriation $ 10,000.00 

Expended 

For Auto and Expenses $ 830.87 

Damages 295.20 

Executions of Court 2,794.34 

Injuries 1,125.00 

Office Expense 42.80 

Services 1,433.75 

All Other Expenses 49.77 

■ $ 6,571.73 

Returned to Treasury 3.428.27 

$ 10,000.00 



50 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

CLERK 

Appropriation— Salaries and Wages •. $ 10,922.00 

Expended 

Salaries: 

To Stephen Flynn, City Clerk $ 2-.800.0C 

Wm. P. McCarthy, Asst. City Clerk 2.700.00 

All Other 5.422.00 

$ 10,922.00 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 1,978.00 

Expended 

For Advertising $ 129.85 

Birth Enumerators 971.90 

Office Expense 276.62 

Printing and Binding 544.75 

All Other Expenses 52.23 



$ 1,975.35 

Returned to Treasury 2,65 



$ 1,978.00 



COMFORT STATION— NORTH COMMON 

Balance from 1924 $ 234.96 

Expended 

For Plumbing $ 52.80 



$ 52.80 

Balance to 1926 186.16 



234.96 



COMFORT STATION 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 8,750.00 

Expended 

Wages: 

To Labor $ 8,740.89 

$ 8,740.89 

Returned to Treasury 9.11 

$ 8,750.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 51 

Comfort Station — Continued 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 2,450.00 

Expended 

^or Fuel and Light $ 628.03 

Janitors Supplies 763.20 

Repairs 74.76 

Water 901.95 

$ 2,367.94 

"eturned to Treasury : 82.06 

$ 2,450.00 

COUNCILLORS 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 7,900.00 

Expended 

Salaries: 

To Councillors $ 7,500.00 

Stephen Flynn, Clerk 400.00 

$ 7,900.00 

Expended 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 885.00 

For Advertising $ 375.99 

Office Expenses 24.87 

Printing 91.25 

Transportation 199.05 

All Other. Expenses 3.0G 

$ 694.16 

Returned to Treasury , 190.84 

$ 885.00 

DEBT 

Appropriation $ 550,653.24 

Expended 

To Various Financial Institutions and 

Individuals $ 547,528.09 

Returned to Treasury 3,125.15 

$ 550.653.24 



53 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

DEDICATION OF SQUARES AND MEMORIALS 

Appropriation $ 1,000.00 

Expended 

For Music $ 366.00 

Printing 226.44 

Transportation 151.50 

All Other Expenses 99.07 

$ 843.01 

Returned to Treasury 156.99 

$ 1,000.00 



DURKEE HOUSE 

Balance from 1924 $ 122.56 

Expended 

Wages: 

To Labor $ 40.50 

% 40.50 

Balance to 1926 82.06 



$ 122.55 



ELECTIONS 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 27,500.00 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages: 

To Hugh C. McOsker, Election Com $ 1,830.10 

J. Omer Allard, Election Com 1,830.10 

Thomas H. Braden, Election Com ,\ 1,830,10 

D. F. Molloy. Election Com 1,800.12 

Andrew F. Roach, successor to Mr. Molloy 32.88 

Clerical 1,449.00 

Precinct Officers 9,276.25 

Registrars Assistants 5,143.25 

All Other 4,308.20 

$ 27,500.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 53 

Elections — Continued 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 19,000.00 

Expended 

For Advertising $ 461.30 

Election Expenses 843.68 

Fuel 31.34 

Light 6G8.54 

Office Expenses 1.001.7S 

Printing and Binding 7,610.10 

Rent of Land for Booths 653.00 

Polling Booth Equipment and Repairs 4,791.78 

Teaming 1,610.00 

All Other Expenses 86.60 

$ 17,758.12 

Returned to Treasury 1,241.88 



$ 19,000.00 



ELECTIONS— "SPECIAL" 

Appropriation $ 10,000.00 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages: 

To J. Omer Allard, Election Com $ 169. 9e 

Andrew F. Roach Election Com 169.86 

Thomas H. Braden, Election Com 169.90 

Frank P. McNeil, successor to Mr. McOsker 158.90 

Clerical 74.67 

Precinct Officers 3,220.75 

Registrars' Assistants 274.66 



Expenses and Supplies: 

For Advertising $ 37.34 

Election Expenses 262.85 

Office Expenses , 213.65 

Printing and Binding 142.50 

Polling Booth Repairs and Equipment 759.69 



$ 5,654.67 

Returned to Treasury 4,345.33 



$ 10,000.00 



54 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 37,593.09 

Expended 
Salaries and Wages: 

To Stephen Kearney, City Engineer $ 4,200.00 

Clerks 2,776.66 

All Other Services 30,421.14 

■ $ 37,397.80 

Returned to Treasury 195.29 

$ 37,593.09 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 1,461.75 



Expended 

For Auto Expenses $ 445.90 

Drafting Expenses 143.19 

Office Supplies, Printing and Binding 805.01 

All Other Expenses 48.75 

— $ . 1,442.85 

Returned to Treasury 18.90 



1,461.75 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 405,700.00 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages: iJ - 

To Edward P. Saunders, Chief $ 3,500.00 

All Other Salaries and Wages 382,180.95 

Pensions • 19,705.09 

$ 405,386.04 

Returned to Treasury '. 313.96 

$ 405,700.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



55 



Fire Department — Continued 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 34,425.00 

Expended 

For Auto Expenses $ 11,166.95 

Building Equipment 2,061.19 

Fire Alarm Expense 694.20 

Fuel and Light 10,458.44 

Hay and Grain 51.50 

Hose 5,292.04 

Laundry 740.64 

Office Expenses 766.33 

Repairs 679.51 

Shoeing 123.25 

Telephone 420.17 

Transportation 50.06 

Water 982.53 

All Other Expenses 172.46 

$ 33,659.27 

Returned to Treasury 765.73 

$ 34,425.00 



FISH AND GAME WARDEN 



Appropriation 



150.00 



Salary: 

To' John B. Kenefick, Warden 



Expended 



150.00 



Appropriation 



FOURTH OF JULY 



1,000.00 



For Fireworks 



Expended 



1,000.00 



5o CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

GENERAL EXPENSES 

Appropriation $ 5,000.00 



Expended 

For Equipment $ 340.52 

Printing and Binding 1,639.73 

Services 1,618.77 

Various Celebrations 601.00 

All Other Expenses 281.57 

$ 4,481.59 

Returned to Treasury 518.41 

$ 5,000.00 



HEALTH— MILK AND VINEGAR 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 5,700.83 



Expended 

Salaries: 

To Melvin F. Master, Inspector $ 2,310.00 

Collector 1,825.83 

Technician 1,565.00 

-$ 5,700.83 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 1,129.17 



Expended 

For Auto Expenses $ 330.66 

Laboratory Equipment and Supplies 324.36 

Office Expenses 247.79 

Transportation 149.06 

All Other 43.02 

% 1,094.89 

Returned to Treasury 34.28 

$ 1,129.17 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 57 

HEALTH OFFICE 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 29,695.84 

Expended 

Salaries: 

To Board of Health $ 2,100.00 

Francis J. O'Hare, Agent 2,665.03 

James Y. Rodger, Bacteriologist 1,000.00 

All Other Services 23,930.81 

$ 29,695.84 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 15,008.16 

Expended 

For Advertising and Printing $ 385.03 

Auto Expenses 287.31 

Burials. 256.00 

Clinic Supplies 165.39 

Contagious Diseases 136.27 

Drugs and Medicine 271.73 

Hospital Treatment 10,450.70 

Laboratory Supplies 149.20 

Laundry 171.29 

Medical Supplies and Services 1,469.48 

Office Expenses 441.90 

Provisions 252.91 

Transportation 526.31 

All Other 41.30 

$ 15,004.82 

Returned to Treasury 3 34 

$ 15,008.16 



HEALTH— DIVISION OF SCHOOL HYGIENE 

Appropriation— Salaries and Wages $ 23,493.04 

Expended 
Salaries : 

To Doctors and Nurses $ 23,481.20 

$ 23,481.20 

Returned to Treasury 11.84 

$ 23,493.04 



5S CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

Health — Division of School Hygiene — Continued 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 3,000.00 

Expended 

For Auto Expenses $ 519.05 

Dental Clinic Expenses 868.56 

Laundry 218.77 

Medical Supplies 109.77 

Office Expenses 107.43 

Provisions 591.11 

Summer Camp Equipment 79.23 

Transportation 495.50 

All Other Expenses 7.32 

— — $ 2,996.74 

Returned to Treasury 3,26 

$ 3,000.00 

HEALTH— YARD 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 55,300.00 

Expended 

Wages: 

To Labor $ 55,042.85 

1 55,042.85 

Returned to Treasury 257.15 

$ 55,300.00 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 5,857.00 

Expended 

For Blacksmith Supplies $ 538.05 

Carriage Repairs 55.54 

Fuel 545.77 

Hardware ". 127.63 

Stable Supplies 279.31 

Hay, Grain, etc 3 369.75 

Laundry 168.00 

Lighting 201.83 

Lumber 313,51 

Water 85.59 

All Other Expenses 40.10 

— $ 5,725.08 

Returned to Treasury 131.92 

$ 5,857.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 59 

HEALTH— PERMANENT CAMP FOR CHILDREN 

Appropriation ..:. $ 5,000.00 

Expended 

Wages : 

To Labor $ 1,483.01 

Other Expenses: 

For Equipment and Repairs 3,355.49 

Mason Supplies 81.50 

Teaming 80.00 

$ 5,000.00 



INSURANCE 

Appropriation $ 20,000.00 

Expended 

To Various Persons and Firms $ 19,869.12 

$ 19,869,12 

Returned to Treasury 130.88 



$ 20,000.00 



INTEREST— CURRENT 

Appropriation $ 55,000.00 

Expended 

To Interest Current $ 55,000.00 



INTEREST— FIXED CHARGE 

Appropriation $ 289,734.47 

Expended 
To Interest— Fixed Charges $ 289,734.47 



60 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

ISOLATION HOSPITAL 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages ....$ 36,833.93 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages: 

To Foster H. Smith, Supt $ 1,800.00 

Physicians 1,500.00 

Clerk 1,043.33 

Wages 32,174.35 

$ 36,517.68 

Returned to Treasury 316.25 

$ 36,833.93 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 32,327.88 

Expended 

For Dental and Medical Services $ 78.00 

Drugs and Chemicals 1,979.42 

Dry Goods, Clothing 476.63 

Equipment, Hardware 2,556.50 

Fuel, Light and Power 7.339.39 

Groceries and Provisions 17,727.52 

Laundry 293.57 

Office Expenses 399.34 

Refunds 79.50 

Transportation, Travelling Expenses 325.03 

Water 936.05 

All Other Expenses 77.71 

$ 32.268.66 

Returned to Treasury 59.22 

$ 32,327.88 

LABOR DAY 

Appropriation $ 1,000.00 

Expended 

For Banquet and Transportation $ 96.00 

Music 475. 0C 

Printing 142.00 

Sports 195.00 

All Other Expenses 80.00 

■ $ 988.00 

Returned to Treasury 12.00 

$ 1,000.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 61 

LABOR REGISTRAR 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 1,000.00 

Expended 
Salary: 

To Patrick J. Reynolds, Registrar $ 1,000.00 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 100.00 

Expended 

For Office Supplies $ 87.55 

Printing 11.00 

$ 98.55 

Returned to Treasury 1.45 



100.00 



LIBRARY 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 23,500.00 

Expended 

To Frederick A. Chase, Librarian $ 3,100.00 

All Other Services 20,396.84 

$ 23,496.84 



Returned to Treasury 3.16 



$ 23,500.00 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 7,010.58 

Expended 

For Binding $ 1,536.26 

Books 937.78 

Equipment, Hardware 603.30 

Lighting 918.00 

Magazines and Newspapers 991.26 

Office Supplies 420.46 

Printing 371.60 

Sub-stations 625.73 

Transportation 282.50 

Water 174.35 

All Other Expenses 129.92 



-$ 6,991.16 

Returned to Treasury 19.42 

$ 7,010.58 



62 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

LIBRARY— JOHN DAVIS FUND 

Receipts 1925 $ 4.749.76 

Expended 

For Books $ 4,594.97 

Balance to 1926 154.79 

$ 4,749.76 



LICENSE COMMISSION 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 5,200.00 

Expended 

Salaries: 

To Chas. H. Hanson, Lie. Commissioner $ 221.86 

James B. Casey, successor to Mr. Hanson 663.11 

Joseph H. McGrath, Lie. Commissioner .... 850.00 

James H. Rooney, Lie. Commissioner 850.00 

Clerk * 2,396.03 

Temporary Clerk 219.00 

■ $ 5,200.00 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 150.00 

Expended 

For Office Supplies : $ 55.90 

Printing and Binding 84.86 

All Other Expenses 9.00 

$ 149.76 

Returned to Treasury .24 

$ 150.00 



LIQUOR LICENSES 

Appropriation $ 5.00 

Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 5.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 63 

LOWELL CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 

Appropriation $ 300.00 

Expended 

For Printing and Supplies $ 19.50 

Clerical Services 12.60 

$ 32.10 

Balance to 1926 267.90 

$ 300.00 



MAYOR'S DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 11,812.00 

Expended 

To John J. Donovan, Mayor $ 5,000.00 

Harry C. Glasheen, Sec'y 2,345.92 

Clerical Services 2,747:16 

Chauffeur 1,718.92 

-$ 11,812.00 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 1,200.00 

Expended 

For Auto Expenses $ 620.07 

Office Expenses 202.70 

Printing and Binding 96.26 

Transportation, Travelling Expenses 202.50 

All Other Expenses 76.25 

— $ 1,197.78 

Returned to Treasury 2.22 

$ 1,200.00 



MEMORIAL DAY— AMERICAN LEGION 

Appropriation $ 1,200.00 

Expended 

For Advertising, Printing $ 320.75 

Collations 317.18 

Music 262.00 



64 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

Memorial Day — American Legion — Continued 

Transportation 127.80 

Wreaths 101.00 

All Other Expenses 70.62 



— $ 1.199.35 

Returned to Treasury .65 



$ 1,200.00 

MEMORIAL DAY— D. W. V. 

Appropriation $ 500.00 

Expended 

For Collations $ 82.50 

Transportation 287.50 

Wreaths 98.00 



All Other Expenses 32.00 



500.00 



MEMORIAL DAY— F. W. V. 

Appropriation $ 300.00 

Expended 

For Collations $ 174.00 

Music 30.00 

Printing 11.19 

Transportation 10.00 

Wreaths 61.00 

All Other Expenses 10.85 

$ 297.04 



Returned to Treasury 2.96 



$ 300.00 

MEMORIAL DAY— G. A. R. 

Appropriation — $ 1,000.00 

Expended 

For Decorations, Flags and Wreaths $ 304.52 

Music 309.00 

Printing 104.73 

Transportation 166.13 

All Other Expenses 115.62 

$ 1,000.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 65 

MEMORIAL DAY— NAVY CLUB 

Appropriation $ 200.00 

Expended 

For Advertising and Printing $ 69.58 

Decorations, Flags and Wreaths 57.00 

Transportation 25.00 

All Other Expenses 43.92 

$ 195.50 

Returned to Treasury 4.50 



200.00 



MEMORIAL DAY— S. of V. 

Appropriation 200.00 

Expended 

For Decorations, Flags and Wreaths .$ 16.00 

Collations 70.63 

Transportation 50.00 

All Other Expenses 56.25 

■ $ 192.88 

Returned to Treasury 7.12 



200.00 



MEMORIAL DAY— S. W. V. 

Appropriation $ 600.00 

Expended 

For Collations $ 210.00 

Decorations, Flags and Wreaths 33.00 

Music 220.00 

Printing 50.00 

Transportation 52.00 

All Other Expenses 35.00 

$ 600.00 



66 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

MEMORIAL DAY— WORLD WAR ASS'N. 

Appropriation $ 100.00 

Expended 

For Transportation $ 50.00 

Wreaths 50.00 

$ 100.00 

MESSENGER 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 2,400.00 

Expended 

Salary: 

To Owen A. Monahan, Messenger $ 2,400.00 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 75.00 

Expended 

For Office Expenses $ 69.08 

All Other Expenses 2.54 

$ 71.62 

Returned to Treasury 3.38 



75.00 



MOTH EXTERMINATION 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 6,469.05 

Expended 
Salaries: 

To John G. Gordon $ 1,937.25 

All Other Services 4,531.80 

$ 6,469.05 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 1,647.95 

Expended 

For Advertising $ 34.74 

Arsenate! of Lead 377.10 

Auto and Expenses 840.11 

Equipment, Hardware 133.81 

Office Expense 42.95 

Transportation 219.22 

$ 1,647.93 

Returned to Treasury .02 



$. 1,647.95 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 67 

MOTHERS WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 100,862.50 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages: 

For Mothers' Aid $ 100 .361.00 

Physician 345^00 

— $ 100,706.00 

Returned to Treasury 156.50 

•.-.•--■■ $ 100,-862.50 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies ......$ 2,750.00 

Expended 

For Board and Care $ 2,513.29 

Burials 174.00 

All Other Expenses 24.36 

— $ 2,711.65 

Returned to Treasury 38.35 

.. , $ 2,750.00 



OUT DOOR RELIEF 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 18,000.00 

Expended 

To John J. O'Connell, Superintendent $ 723.29 

Stephen C. Garrity, Superintendent 1,608.86 

Various Physicians 2,916.62 

All Other Services ,.. 12,450.21 

$ 17,698.98 

Returned to Treasury 301.02 

$ 18,000.00 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 219,583.48 

Expended 

For Ambulance Expenses $ 5,314.11 

Auto and Expenses 2,457.00 

Burials 1,671.00 

Cash Allowances 38,169.00 

Dispensary Expenses 2,950.04 

Fuel 27,698.06 



6? 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



Out Door Relief — Continued 

Office Expenses 1,717.14 

Provisions 118,645.37 

Relief 

Local Institutions 6,402.36 

State Institutions 4.712.36 

Other Institutions 1,009.49 

Relief Other Cities and Towns 4,561.73 

Transportation 140.81 

All Other Expenses 169.57 

$ 215,618.04 

Returned to Treasury 3,965.44 



$ 219,583.48 



* PARKS— GENERAL 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 50,000.00 

Expended 

To John W. Kernan, Superintendent $ 3,800.00 

Playgrounds 4,985.00 

All Other Salaries and Wages 41,094.94 

$ 49,879.94 

Returned to Treasury 120.08 

$ 50,000.00 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 28,049.91 

Expended 

For Annual Expenses $ 257.19 

Auto and Expenses 3,402.15 

Broken Stone, Binder 229.87 

Carnival Expenses 359.35 

Contracts 2,571.28 

Cinders, Pilling Sand 502.70 

Edgestone 1,901.59 

Equipment, Hardware 936.75 

Hay, Grain, etc 166.84 

Land 5,250.00 

Laundry 64.68 

Lighting :. 251.50 



CITY AUDITOR'S RErORT 69 

Parks — Gen err. I — Continued 

Lumber 315.38 

Moving Pictures 482.00 

Office Expenses 335.22 

Plants, Shrubs, Trees, etc 1,190.63 

Playground Expenses 2,608.30 

Police Officers 877.50 

Printing 524.50 

Repairs 743.24 

Tractor Expenses 333.09 

Teaming, Trucking 4 228.36 

All Other Expenses 229.85 

$ 27,761.97 



Returned to Treasury 287.97 



$ 28,049.94 



PARKS— NEW CONSTRUCTION 

Appropriation $ 20,000.00 

Expended 

Wages: 

To Labor $ 8,622.93 

Other Expenses: 

For Building Expenses 1,582.57 

Filling '. 7,041.84 

Surveys and Plans 1,617.14 

Teaming 419.00 

Tennis Equipment 716.48 

$ 19,999.96 

Returned to Treasury .04 

$ 20 000.00 

PLANNING BOARD 

Appropriation $ 1,000.00 

Expended 

For Office Expenses $ 188.50 • 

Professional Services 150.00 

Travelling Expenses 97.00 

$ 435.50 

Returned to Treasury 564.50 

$ 1,000.00 



70 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

PLAYGROUND— SHEDD SPECIAL 

Balance from 1924 $ 99,850.00 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages: 

To Clerical Services $ 620.00 

Other Expenses: 

For Contracts 51,421.24 

Drafting Expenses 327.20 

Professional Services 5,732.50 

All Other Expenses 87.98 

$ 58,188.92 

Balance to 1926 40,661.08 

$ 98,850.00 



PLAYGROUND— SOUTH LOWELL 

Balance from 1924 $ 3,000.00 

Expended 

For Examining Titles, etc $ 211.50 

Land Award 737.50 

$ 949,00 

Balance to 1926 2,051.00 

$ 3,000.00 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 349,430.50 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages: 

To Chief of Police $ 3,499.99 , 

All Other Salaries and Wages 334,039.53 

Pensions 11,797.87 

$ 349,337.39 

Returned to Treasury 93.11 

$ 349,430.50 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 71 

Police Department' — Continued 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 7,739.95 

Expended 

For Auto Expenses $ 2,295.12 

Equipment and Repairs 1,180.41 

Fuel 1,093.19 

Hardware 158.83 

Laundry 77.20 

Lighting 934.21 

Motorcycle Repairs and Supplies 441.22 

Office Expenses 785.88 

Telegraph 159.49 

Telephone 233.90 

Transportation 82.69 

Water 244.39 

All Other Expenses 51.50 

$ 7,738.03 

Returned to Treasury .' 1.92 

$ 7,739.95 

POUND KEEPER 

Appropriation $ 5.00 

Expended 

Salary: 

To A. B. Humphreys, Pound Keeper $ 5,00 

PREPARING, CERTIFYING and MARKETING BONDS 

Appropriation $ 1,470.00 

Expended 

To First National Bank of Boston '. $ 1,470.00 

PUBLIC SERVICE BOARD 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 3,000.00 

Expended 

To Dennis J. Murphy $ 1,000.00 

Fred G. Leary 1,000.00 

Frederick Meloy 1,000.00 

$ 3,000.00 



72 CIT-Y AUDITOR'S REPORT 

Public Service Board — Continued 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 500.00 

Expended 

For Auto Expenses $ 219.82 

Office Supplies Printing 146.25 

All Other Expenses 107.42 

$ 473.49 

Returned to Treasury 26.51 

$ 500.00 



PURCHASING AGENT'S DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 9,524.00 



Expended 

To Edward J. Donnelly, Purchasing Agent ....$ 2,500.00 

Inspector 2,004.71 

Clerks 5,017.79 

-$ 9.522.50 

Returned to Treasury 1.50 



$ 9,524.00 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 2,376.25 



Expended 

For Advertising $ 842.81 

Auto Expenses 670.30 

Binding and Printing 242.10 

Office Expenses 462.95 

All Other Expenses 158.00 

$ 2,376.16 

Returned to Treasury .09 



2,376.25 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 73 

RESURFACING CENTRAL BRIDGE 

Balance from 1924 $ 4,645.25 

Expended 

Wages : 

To Labor $ 1,143.47 

Other Expenses: 

For Contracts 1,775.47 

Hardware and Repairs 282.30 

All Other Expenses 116.00 

$ 3,317.24 

Balance to 1926 1,328.01 



$ 4,645.25 



REVISION OF ORDINANCES 

Balance from 1924 $ 600.00 

Appropriation 1925 900.00 



1,500.00 



Expended 

For Legal Services $ 600.00 

$ 600.00 

Balance to 1926 900.00 



$ 1,500.00 



RIFLE RANGE 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 1,252.00 

Expended 

To Thomas Sexton, Keeper $ 1,251.43 

Returned to Treasury .57 



$ 1,252.00 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 296.00 

Expended 

For Repairs $ 198.70 

Telephone 66.66 

$ 265.36 

Returned to Treasury 30.64 

S 296.00 



74 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



SCHOOLS— GENERAL 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 1,150,028.50 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages: 

To Hugh J. Molloy, Superintendent $ 6,000.00 

Pensions 942.00 

All Other Salaries and Wages 1,143,086.50 

$ 1,150,028.50 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 165,457.64 

Expended 

For Athletic Expenses $ 1,942.19 

Auto Expenses 4,966.56 

Board Truants, Training School 886.57 

Cooking and Manual Training 12,246.48 

Drugs, Chemicals, etc 448.70 

Electrical Repairs 2,804.43 

Furniture, Furnishings 5,083.47 

General Repairs 5,165.92 

Graduation Expenses 1,212.17 

Fuel, Light and Power 52,919.15 

Insurance 1,366.60 

Janitors' Supplies 1,205.14 

Laundry 3,011.44 

Music 791.33 

Paper, Pens, Pencils, etc 14,479.39 

Printing, Binding 3,642.23 

Physical Training 2,211.67 

Portable Schools 6,241.26 

Professional Services 326.60 

Rent of Lanct" 240.00 

Sewing Expenses 712.78 

Telephone 1,518.32 

Text and Reference Books 25,983.71 

Transportation of Pupils, etc 6,826.61 

Typewriters and Repairs 2,026.08 

Water 5,609.40 

All Other Expenses 1,262.50 

$ 165,130.70 

Returned to Treasury 326.94 



$ 165,457.64 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



75 



SCHOOLS— VOCATIONAL 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 83,000.00 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages: 

To Janitors $ 5,360.00 

Teachers 77,640.00 

$ 83,000.00 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 17,035.13 

Expended 

For Auto Expenses $ 1,006.12 

Cooking and Sewing Supplies 899.63 

Electrical Work and Supplies 1,179.54 

Equipment and Hardware 2,210.22 

Fuel 990.76 

Groceries and Provisions 4,229.18 

Laundry 1,540.32 

Lighting 1,355.69 

Lumber 1,323.11 

Machinery, Tools, etc. 590.11 

Office Supplies and Printing 808.33 

Text and Reference Books 314.69 

Telephone 140.60 

Transportation 158.80 

All Other Expenses 93.14 

$ 16,840.24 

Returned to Treasury 194.89 



$ 17,035.13 



SMITH-HUGHES FUND 

Cash Receipts $ 9,667.02 



Salaries: 

To Various Persons 



Expended 



.$ 9,667.02 



76 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

SEALER of WEIGHTS and MEASURES 
Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 7.900.00 

Expended 

Salaries: 

To Warren P. Riordan $ 2,200.00 

All Other Services 5,541.75 

$ 7,741.75 

Returned to Treasury 158.25 

$ 7,900.00 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 1,159.26 

Expended 

For Office Expenses $ 288.11 

Truck Expenses 458. 2S 

Working Standards and Tools 321.14 

All Other Expenses 91.33 

$ 1,158.81 

Returned to Treasury .45 

$ 1,159.26 

SEWER MAINTENANCE 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 22,500.00 

Expended 

Wages : 

To Labor $ 22,495.68 

$ 22,495.68 

Returned to Treasury 4.32 

$ 22,500.00 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 4,513.00 

Expended 

For Auto Expenses $ 1,259.63 

Equipment and Hardware 1,979.87 

Fuel, Light and Power 337.52 

Repairs 757.87 

All Other Expenses 157.42 

$ 4,492.31 

llsturned to Treasury 20.69 

$ 4,513.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 7? 

SIDEWALKS— NEW 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 8,000.00 

Expended 

Wages : 

To Labor $ 7,997.14 

Returned to Treasury 2.86 

$ 8,000.00 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 15,406.30 

Expended 

For Edgestones 11,916.70 

Granolithic 1,237.60 

Sand, Brick, Cement 31.00 

Services of Assistants 1,071.24 

Transportation 19.70 

$ 14,276.24 

Returned to Treasury 1130.06 

$ 15,406.30 



SINKING FUND 

Appropriation $ 4,000.00 

Expended 

To the Commissioners of Sinking Funds $ 4,000.00 



SMOKE INSPECTOR 

Appropriation $ 500.00 



Expended 

Salary: 

To Charles J. Riley $ 500.00 



78 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

SOLDIERS' BENEFITS 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages .$ 4, 640.00 

Expended 

Salaries: 

To William A. Arnold, Superintendent $ 1,600.00 

All Other Services 3,040.00 

■$ 4,640.00 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 42,264.00 

Expended 

For Office Expenses $ 83.80 

Transportation 297.41 

Military Aid: 

To Various Persons 3,247.00 

Soldiers' Relief: 

For Aid, Various Persons 29,485.00 

Burials 111.00 

"Fuel 411.40 

Groceries and Provisions 3,929.18 

Medicine and Medical Services 546.51 

All Other Expenses 3.50 

State Aid: 

To Various Persons 4,128.00 

$ 42,242.89 

Returned to Treasury 21.11 

$ 42,264.00 

SOLDIERS' GRAVES 

Appropriation $ l Ll 000.00 

Expended 

For Care of Graves $ 999.62 

Returned to Treasury .38 

$ 1,000.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT. 79 

SOLICTOR 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 8,675.00 

Expended 

To Patrick J. Reynolds, City Solicitor $ 3,200.00 

Henry P. Kelley, Claims Agent 2,400.00 

Clerical Services 3,051.39 

$ 8,651.39 

Returned to Treasury 23.61 

$ 8,675.00 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 1,000.00 

Expended 

For Books $ 256.25 

Office Expenses 483.56 

Printing and Binding 68.15 

Transportation, Travelling Expenses 109.14 

All Other Expenses 41.62 

$ 958.72 

Returned to Treasury 41.28 

$ 1,000.00 



STREET LIGHTING 

Appropriation $ 165,500.00 

Expended 

For Electric Lighting $ 126,858.94 

Gas Lighting 38,528.88 

Printing 23.50 

$ 165,411.32 

Returned to Treasury 88.68 

$ 165,500.00 



80 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

STREET MAINTENANCE 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 253,738.50 

Expended 

To Henry P. Doherty, Superintendent $ 2,600.00 

Clerical Services 10,248.46 

Pensions 1,784.56 

Labor 238,893.55 

$ 253,526.57 

Returned to Treasury 211.93 

$ 253,738.50 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 107,816.82 



Expended 

For Auto Expenses $ 9,950.91 

Concrete, Cinders, Sand, Gravel, Crushed 

Stone, etc 16,383.06 

Cold Patch 7,896.88 

Equipment Repairs 4,217.09 

Fuel 1,738.77 

Gasoline 6 955.99 

General Repairs 520.37 

General Administration 6,085.66 

Hardware 3,305.48 

Harnesses, Stable Supplies 1,237.18 

Horse Feed 24,174.13 

Horse Medicine, Veterinary Services 246.54 

Laundry 172.20 

Lighting 843.49 

Lime, Brick and Cement 2,667.89 

Lumber 1,752.09 

Office Supplies and Printing 2,009.23 

Plow Hire 4,894.94 

New Equipment 4,706.54 

Recut Blocks 528.56 

Rental of Land Track 157.00 

Road Oil 1,676.39 

Steam Roller Expenses 1,148.99 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 81 

Street Maintenance — Continued 

Transportation 675.56 

Use of Horses, Autos, Wagons 252.55 

Water 671.94 

All Other Expenses 302.28 

■ $ 105,171.71 

Returned to Treasury 2,645.11 

$ 107,816.82 



STREET SPRINKLING 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 7,000.00 

Expended 

Wages : 

To Labor .$ 6,810.98 

Returned to Treasury 189.02 

$ 7,000.00 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 23,000.00 

Expended 

For Oil and Applying OU $ 8,164.87 

Sand 1,246.89 

Travel Power, Car Sprinkler 10,580.07 

Water 2,800.00 

All Other Expenses 208.17 

$ 23,000.00 



STREET SPRINKLING "SPECIAL" 

Appropriation '. $ 5,000.00 

Expended 

For Sand '.'. $ 279.46 

Services of Assistants 471.79 

Travel Power, Car Sprinkler 3 950.83 

All Other Expenses 90.00 

$ 4,792.08 

Returned to Treasury 207.92 

$ 5,000.00 



82 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

TAXES— CIVILIAN WAR POLL 

Balance from 1924 $ 9,669.00 



Expended 



$ 9,669.00 



TAXES— CORPORATION 

Appropriation $ 177.28 

Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 177.28 



TAXES— COUNTY 

Appropriation $ 226,403.35 

Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 226,403.35 



TAXES 
INVESTIGATING SEWERAGE IN CONCORD RIVER 

Appropriation •. $ 2,375.49 

Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 2,375.49 



TAXES 
INVESTIGATING SEWERAGE in MERRIMACK RIVER 

Appropriation $ 4,586.28 

Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 4,586.28 



TAXES— NATIONAL BANK 

Appropriation $ 1,063.37 

Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 1,063.37 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 83 

TAXES— NON RESIDENT BANK 

Appropriation $ 494.49 

Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts , $ 493.87 

Returned to Treasury .62 

$ 494.49 

TAXES— STATE 

Appropriation $ 297,240.00 

Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 297,240.00 

TAXES 
STATE AUDIT MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTS 

Appropriation $ 2,293.48 

Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 2,293.48 

TAXES— SOLDIERS' EXEMPTION 

Appropriation $ 445.13 

Expended 
To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 445.13 

TAXES— STATE HIGHWAY 
Appropriation $ 3,981.83 

Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 3,981.83 



TEXTILE SCHOOL 

Appropriation $ 10,000.00 

Expended 

To Commonwealth of Massachusetts $ 10,000.00 



84 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

TREASURER AND COLLECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 19,200.00 

Expended 

Salaries: 

To Fred H, Rourke, Treasurer and Collector $ 3,500.00 

. Clerks ...., 15,049.23 

Writing Tax Bills 650.77 

$ 19,200.00 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 4,600.00 

Expended 

For Advertising $ 1,287.78 

Office Expenses 600.60 

Postage 1,259.25 

Premiums on Bonds 680.00 

Printing and Binding 441.96 

Transportation Expenses 241.00 

All Other Expenses 89.41 

$ 4,600.00 



TREASURER— SPECIAL 

Appropriation $ 1,219.00 

Expended 

For Salaries and Wages $ .77 

For Other Expenses: 

Advertising 6.50 

Office Expenses .198.40 

Postage 401.20 

Premiums on Bonds 70.00 

Printing and Binding 400.49 

Transportation Expenses 127.00 

All Other Expenses 13.90 

$ 1,218.26 

Returned to Treasury .74 

$ 1 219.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT So 

UNSATISFIED JUDGMENT 

Appropriation I 3,357.58 

Expended 

For Execution of Court „ $ 3,357.58 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 273,607.23 



Expended 

Salaries: . _. 

To James H. Reynolds, Superintendent '...$ 3,094.81 

William Hunt, Asst. Supt 2,611.19 

All Other Salaries and Wages 266,058.61 

Pensions ,.... 1,693.64 

$ 273,458.25 

Returned to Treasury : 148.98 

$ 273,607.23 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ . 180,626.26 



Expended 

For Pumping Station: 

Engine Supplies and Repairs $ 2,626.73 

Fuel and Light 27,201.78 

Oil 2,311.54 

Packing 501.19 

All Other Expenses 40.28 

For Water Works General: 

Auto Expenses 15,767.66 

Freight and Express 416.39 

Gates and Hydrants S, 354. 77 

Insurance 245.44 

Meters and Fittings :.".'' 4.877.63 

Office Expenses 1,635.61 

Pipe and Fittings 35,201.60 



86 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

Water Department — Continued 

Refunds 207.67 

Repairs and Equipment 38,436.01 

Services of Assistants 4,367.49 

Stable Expenses 141.39 

Water Works Debt Payment 28,000.00 

Water Works Interest Payment 8,340.00 

All Other Expenses 458.96 

$ 179,132.14 

Returned to Treasury 1,494.12 

$ 180,626.26 



WEIGHER 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 1,400.00 

Expended 

Salary: 

To George Enwright $ 1,400.00 

Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies .....$ 25.00 

Expended 

For Printing $ 23.00 

$ 23.00 

Returned to Treasury , 2.00 



$ 25.00 



WIRE DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation — Salaries and Wages $ 3,500.00 

Expended 

Salaries: 

To Charles L. Gallagher, Wire Inspector $ 2,000.00 

Clerical Services 1,500.00 

$ 3,500.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 87 

Wire Department — Continued 
Appropriation — Expenses and Supplies $ 1,400.00 

Expended 

For Auto Repairs and Supplies $ 357.29 

Automobile 603.00 

Office Supplies. Printing 393.37 

All Other Expenses , • 45.78 

$ 1,399.44 

Returned to Treasury .56 

$ 1,400.00 

WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION 
Appropriation $ 7,032.01 

Expended 
Other Expenses: 

To Various Persons (Compensation) $ 5,052.66 

Medical Treatment 1,455.40 

Printing and Supplies 17.35 

All Other Expenses 20.00 

$ 6,545.41 

Returned to Treasury 486.60 

$ 7,032.01 



CLASSIFICATION OF 

Departmental Expenses 
Non-Revenue 



90 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION 

Balance from 1924 $ 14,979.91 

Transfer 1925 22.91 

$ 15,002.82 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages: 

To Labor $ 100.00 

Other Expenses: 

For Advertising 21.38 

Contracts 14,814.95 

All Other Expenses 6.90 

$ 14,943.23 

Balance to 1926 .". 59.59 

| 15,002.82 



FIRE EQUIPMENT LOAN 

Balance from 1924 $ 51,699.61 

Expended 

For Advertising $ 14.00 

Architects Service 321.23 

Equipment and Repairs 49,500.31 

$ 49,835.54 

Balance to 1926 1,864.07 

$ 51,699.61 



FIRST ST. EXTENSION 

Balance from 1924 $ 10,310.15 

Expended 

For Court Expenses $ 183.34 

$ 183.34 

Balance to 1926 10,126.81 

$ 10,310.15 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 91 

HALL AND AIKEN STREETS WIDENING 

Balance from 1924 $ 1,146.85 

Expended 

Salaries and Wages: 

To Labor $ 1,114.86 

Other Expenses: 

For General Administration 31.99 

. $ 1,146.85 



MACADAMIZING 

Balance from 1924 $ 4,031.41 

Appropriation „ 108,618.77 

$ 112,650.18 

Expended 

Wages: 

To Labor $ 33,520.65 

Other Expenses: 

For Advertising ~ 59.01 

Asphalt 49,508.33 

Coal 181.93 

Concrete 13,630.39. 

Crushed Stone, Cinders, Sand, etc 7,983.31 

Equipment Repairs 606.49 

General Administration 2,319.14 

Oil 22.48 

Printing 142.50 

Rental of Equipment 3,985.00 

$ 111,959.23 

Balance to 1926 690.95 

I 112,650.18 



MACADAM— SPECIAL 

Balance from 1924 $ 251.76 

Expended 

For Concrete $ 251.76 



92 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

MACADAM— STANDISH STREET 

Appropriation 

Expended 

Wages: 

To Labor $ 549.83 

Other Expenses: 

For Asphalt and Concrete $ 3,242.10 

General Administration 1,257.70 

Balance to 1926 

MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM 

Balance from 1924 '.'. $ 

Balance to 1926 $ 

MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM 
ADDITIONAL LOAN 

Balance from 1924 $ 

Balance to 1926 $ 

OAKLAND FIRE HOUSE 

Balance from 1924 $ 

Balance to 1926 $ 

PARKS— ANNE STREET 

Balance from 1924 $ 

Balance to 1926 $ 

PARKS— AYER FIELD 

Balance from 1924 $ 

Balance to 1926 $ 



5,500.00 



5,049.63 

450.37 



$ 5,500.00 



223.35 
223.35 



440.78 
440.78 



60.91 
60.91 



709.04 
709.04 



54.30 
54.30 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

PARKS— RIVERSIDE STREET 

Balance from 1924 $ 

Expended 

For Professional Services $ 303.99 

■ 5 

Balance to 1926 



93 



4,791.67 



303.99 
4,487.68 



4,791.67 



PAVING 

Balance from 1924 $ 1,2J)0.00 

Appropriation 1925 147,940.41 

$ 149,140.41 

Expended 

Wages : 

To Labor $ 81,798.55 

Other Expenses: 

For Advertising 446.69 

Cement 16,722.00 

, Coal • 79.13 

Crushed Stone and Concrete 18,618.3? 

Edgestone 576.34 

Equipment Rental 11,739.66 

General Administration 3,139.00 

oil :.:.:..:...:: ;. 6i.85 

Lumber 378.53 

Printing ?. % 275.00 

Recut Blocks 8,231.67 

Repairs ...\ 1,084.42 

Sand ......;....... 5,595.17 

Teaming, Transportation 100.00 

Water 128.88 

$ 148,975.27 

Balance to 1926 165.14 

$ 149,140.41 



94 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

PAVING— BRIDGE STREET 

Appropriation $ 32,511.58 

Expended 

Wages: 

To Labor $ 16,370.06 

Other Expenses 

For Cement 5,603.71 

Gasoline and Oil 4.58 

General Administration 1,123.32 

Recut Blocks 1,237.00 

Repairs 1,454.76 

Sand 899.13 

Stone 5,320.59 

Teaming 486.50 

$ 32,499.65 

Balance to 1926 11.93 



$ 32,511.58 



PAVING— LAKEVIEW AVENUE 

Appropriation , $ 25,027.54 

Expended 

Wages: 

To Labor $ 13,444.28 

Other Expenses: 

For Cement $ 2,433.47 

Gasoline and Oil 9.04 

General Administration 222.74 

Rental of Equipment 1,219.40 

Repairs 115.22 

Sand 1,125.65 

Stone : 1,888.73 

$ 20,458.53 

Balance to 1926 4 569.01 

$ 25,027.54 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 95 

PAVING— LAWRENCE STREET 

Balance from 1924 $ 1,215.94 

Expended 

Other Expenses: 

For Concrete $ 704.74 

Water 39.42 

$ 744.16 

Balance to 1926 471.78 

$ 1,215.94 



PAVING— STEVENS STREET 

Appropriation $ 10,000.00 

Expended 

Wages : 

To Labor $ 3,998.26 

Other Expenses: 

For Cement 2,097.81 

General Administration 1,043.08 

Rental of Equipment 978.42 

Sand 291.92 

Stone 1,487.01 

$ 9,896.50 

Balance to 1926 , 103.50 

$ 10,000.00 



PLAYGROUNDS— GENERAL 

Balance from 1924 $ 1,096.33 

Balance to 1926 $ 1,096.33 



96 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

PLAYGROUNDS— CENTRALVILLE 

Balance from 1924 $ 352.06 

Expended 

Other Expenses: 

For Examination of Title $ 75.00 

$ 75.00 

Balance to 1926 277.06 

$ 352.06 



PLAYGROUNDS— JOHN J. O'DONNELL 

Balance from 1924 $ 9,221.40 

Appropriation 1925 6,000.00 

$ 15,221.40 

Expended 

Other Expenses: 

For Court Expenses $ 659.65 

Examination of Title 450.00 

Execution of Court 12,620.67 

$ 13,730.32 

Balance to 1926 1,491.08 

$ 15,221.40 



PLAYGROUNDS— MOREY STREET 

Balance from 1924 $ 5,047.81 

Expended 

Wages: 

To Labor $ 316.55 

Other Expenses: 

For Teaming 57.00 

$ 373.55 

Balance to 1926 4,674.26 

$ 5,047.81 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 97 

PUBLIC BATH AND COMFORT STATION 

Balance from 1924 $ 48.50 

Balance to 1926 48.50 

SCHOOL HOUSES— GENERAL 

Balance from 1924 $ 1,029.55 

Expended 

Other Expenses: 

For Architect's Services $ 196.97 

Contract 300.00 

Legal Services 108.15 

$ 605.12 

Balance to 1926 424.43 

$ 1,029.55 

SCHOOL HOUSES— NEW HIGH 

Balance from 1924 $ 28,258.63 

Expended 
Other Expenses: 

For Advertising $ 41.34 

Contracts 19,723.96 

Furniture, Furnishings 5,163.52 

All Other Expenses 103.18 

$ 25,032.00 

Balance to 1926 3,226.63 

$ 28,258.63 

SEWER CONSTRUCTION 

Balance from 1924 $ 419.45 

Appropriation 130,374.86 

$ 130,794.31 

Expended 
Wages : 

To Labor $ 98 803.74 

Other Expenses: 

For Auto Expenses 159.03 

Brick 2,641.21 



98 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



Sewer Construction — Continued 

Castings 4,709.55 

Cement 1,590.25 

Coal 451.22 

Contracts 3,673.50 

Dynamite 258.50 

Equipment 1,249.71 

Gasoline 1,760.53 

General Administration 4.302.01 

Hardware 3,055.72 

Kerosene 101.11 

Lumber 224.22 

Oakum 115.37 

Pipe and Fittings 5,450.20 

Repairs 313.38 

Transportation 39.23 

All Other Expenses 75.49 

$ 128,973.97 

Balance to 1926 1,820.34 



$ 130,794.31 



SEWERS— OAKLAND MAIN 

Balance from 1924 , '..$ 15,575.49 

Transfer 1925 12.46 

$ 15,587.95 

Expended 

Wages: 

To Labor $ 13 038.17 

Other Expenses: 

For Cement 132.72 

Coal 1,068.68 

Equipment, Hardware 221.45 

Water 46.88 

All Other Expenses 42.26 

$ 14,550.16 

Balance to 1926 1,037.79 



$ 15,587.95 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 99 

WATER MAIN LOAN 1925 

Appropriation $ 75,000.00 

Expended 

Wages: 

To Labor '. $ 7,832.19 

Other Expenses: 

For Engine Supplies and Repairs 984.94 

Gates and Hydrants 4,941.51 

General Administration 23,607.23 

Pipe 32,288.10 

Repairs and Equipment 2,585.24 

Transportation 2,310.83 

All Other Expenses 159.33 

-$ 74,709.37 

Balance to 1926 290.6S 



$ 75,000.00 



Fund* 



CARNEY MEDAL 

CEMETERY 

JOHN DAVIS 

NEW SCHOOL HOUSES 

SINKING 

JOHNATHAN TYLER 

HAPGOOD WRIGHT 



102 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

FUNDS, YEAR 1925 

Carney Medal Fund: 

On hand January 1, 1925, Fund $ 200.00 

Income 7.57 

Income earned 9.09 

On hand December 31, 1925 $ 216.66 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund: 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Fund 

On hand January 1, 1925 $205,898.95 

Receipts received for establishment of fund 10,600.00 

Income earned 9,093.27 

$225,592.22 
Transfer of income to Cemetery appropriation 14,605.00 

On hand December 31, 1925 $210,987.22 

John Davis Fund: 

On hand January 1, 1925, Fund $107,600.00 

Income 78.71 

$107,678.71 
Income earned 4.758.S0 

$112,437.51 
Transfer of income to Library appropriation 4,749.76 
Decrease in value B. & M. stock 1,400.00 6,149.76 

On hand December 31, 1925 '. $106,287.75 

New School Houses Sinking Fund: 

Due July 1, 1926 ' $200,000.00 

Value January 1, 1925 238,786.75 

Value December 31, 1925 253,600.57 

Increase during- year 14,813.82 

Johnathan Tyler Fund: 

On hand January 1, 1925 $ 10,000.00 

Income earned 465.29 

$ 10,465.29 
Income paid Trustees 465.29 

On hand December 31, 1925 , . $ 10,000.00 

Hapgood "Wright Centennial Trust Fund: 

On hand January 1, 1925 $ 1 5,464.85 

Interest earned 637.18 

On hand December 31, 1925 $ 16,102.03 

Joseph Henry Stackpole Fund: 

On hand January 1, 1925 . . . : .$ 1,000.00 

Interest earned • • 45.50 

$ 1,045.50 
Transfer of income to Cemetery appropriation 45.50 

On hand December 31, 1925 $ 1,000.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 103 



REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF THE 
SINKING FUNDS FOR THE YEAR 1925 



Lowell, Mass,, January 1, 1926. 
To the City Council of Lowell: 
Gentlemen : 

The Commissioners of the Sinking- Funds of the City of Lowell have 
:he honor to submit the following report of the New School Houses 
Sinking- Fund of said City for the yeah 1925: 

Value of New School Houses Sinking Fund, January 1, 1926 . .$253,600.57 
Value of New School Houses Sinking Fund, January 1, 1925 . . 238,786.75 



Icrease during the year $ 14,813.82 



104 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



NEW SCHOOL HOUSE SINKING FUND 

Securities Cash Total 

On hand January 1, 1925 $238,500.00 $ 286.75 $238,786.75 

RECEIVED DURING 1925: 

CASH— Annual Appropriation 4,000.00 

Income on Investments 11,049.88 

Income on Bank Deposits 28.85 

Securities, sold or matured 0.00 

SECURITIES— Bought during 1925 . . 8,500.00 

$247,000.00 $ 15,365.48 

PAID DURING 1925: 

SECURITIES— Sold or matured 0.00 

CASH — For securities purchased .... 8,764.91 

On hand December 31, 1925 $247,000.00 $ 6,600.57 253,600.57 

Increase during 1925 ' $ 14,813.82 



SECURITIES BELONGING TO THIS FUND 



Rate Par Value Maturity 
75 N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R, Coupon Bonds. .4% $ 75,000.00 July, 1955 

1 B. & M. R. R. Registered Bond 4% 10,000.00 Jan. 1944 

9 B .& M. R. R. Coupon Bonds 4 9,000.00 Aug. 1942 

2 St. Johnsbury & L. Cham. C. Bonds 5 2,000.00 Mar. 1944 

15 B. & M. R. R. Coupon Bonds 4 15,000.00 Sept. 1926 

42 U. S. Govt. 3d Liberty Coupon Bonds.. 4% 49,900.00 Sept. 1928 

9 U. S. Treasury Notes 4% 6,100.00 Mar. 1926 

2 Boston & Lowell R. R. Coupon Bonds . .4 2,000.00 Apr. 1932 

25 Worcester Con. R. R. Coupon Bonds ..5 25,000.00 Nov. 1927 

10 Boston Elevated R. R. Coupon Bonds ..4 10,000.00 May 1935 

15 B. & M. R. R. Coupon Bonds 6 15,000.00 June 1930 

28 Lynn & Boston R. R. Coupon Bonds . . .6 28,000.00 Dec. 1929 

$247,000.00 
Cash on deposit in Appleton National Bank.... 6,600.57 

$253,600.57 

Respectfully submitted, 

COMMISSIONERS OF THE SINKING FUNDS, 
By FRED H. ROURKE, 
Treasurer. 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 105 



HAPGOOD WRIGHT CENTENNIAL TRUST FUND 

Lowell, Mass., January 1, 1926. 
To the City Council of Lowell: 
Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to submit the following report of the Hapgood 
Wright Centennial Trust Fund for the year 1925: 

On hand January 1, 1925 $ 15,464.85 

RECEIVED DURING- 1925: 

CASH — Income on Bank Deposits 637.18 

On hand December 31, 1925 $16,102.03 

The amount above is invested as follows: 

Washington Savings Institution $ 13,558.87 

Lowell Institution for Savings 2,543.16 

$ 16,102.03 

Principal sum in Fund $ 7,343.79 

Accrued Interest 8,758.24 

$ 16,102.03 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED H. ROURKE, 

City Treasurer. 



106 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

STATEMENT OF CITY TREASURER RELATING 

TO SPECIAL FUNDS FOR CARE OF PUBLIC 

BURIAL GROUNDS 



Lowell, Mass., January 1, 1926. 
To the City Council: 

Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to submit the following- statement of Special Funds 
in my hands, deposited for perpetual care of lots in the Public Burial 
Grounds of the City of Lowell: 

On hand January 1, 1925 $184,055.00 

Received during the year from — 

Alfred J. Smith $100.00 

John A. Farron 50.00 

Henry T. Tonney 50.00 

A. M. Wentworth 50.00 

William J. Setzer, Ex 100.00 

Margaret Ramsbottom, Ex 50.00 

Calvin L. & Arthur C. Galley 100.00 

John L. Stanchfleld 100.00 

Sybil E. & R. L. Ramsdell 100.00 

Helen L. Thomas 100.00 

Mrs. Mary Sawyer Knapp 100.00 

John G. Leith 100.00 

Abbie F. Gregware 100.00 

James E. Burns, Ex 100.00 

Mrs. Flora Gray 100.00 

Laura E. Woodward 100.00 

Walter H. Baker 50.00 

Arthur Crowther 100,00 

Elizabeth ' M. Kent 50.00 

Mrs. Oliver Stevens 100.00 

John F. Welch 100.00 

Florence Hartwell 100.00 

Mrs. Mary A. Whiteley 100.00 

William H. Saunders, Ex 25.00 

Florence E. Dobson & John W. Anderson, Ex 100.00 

John G. Popplewell 100.00 

Mrs. Florence Wadleigh 100.00 

Walter H. McKinnon 100.00 

Emma M. Graham 100.00 

William H. Fuller 100.00 

Walter H. Gilman 150.00 

Effie E. Cook 50.00 

Eliza J. Stiles, Admx 200.00 

Ralph E. Badger & Helen B. Darling 150.00 

William H. Saunders 50.00 

Thomas Duckworth (Mrs. George Scott) 100.00 

Thomas Duckworth (Mrs. Bertha A. Smith) 50.00 



CITY AUDITORS REPORT 107 



Fannie I. Crysler 100.00 

William C. Carter 200.00 

Thomas Duckworth (J. A. & J. A. Evans) 100.00 

Edward L. Childs 100.00 

Anthony D. Mitten 100.00 

Sam O. Wade 100.00 

Thomas Duckworth 100.00 

Mrs. Mary A. Bowser ' 25.00 

Walter B. Hunt 100.00' 

Thomas Duckworth 100.00 

Clarence A. McCoy & Lulu G. Johnson, Ex 100.00 

Samuel S. Cunningham 100.00 

Thomas Duckworth 50.00 

Mrs. Craven Midgeley 100.00 

Miss K. C. Milliard 50.00 

E. M. Fadden 100.00 

Thomas Duckworth 100.00 

Warren R. Stone, Ex r 100.00 

Thomas Duckworth 100.00 

Mrs. C. E. Clark ! 100.00 

William P. Hovey 100.00 

Mrs. Helen M. Bowser 50.00 

Charles M. Dickey : 100.00 

W. Herbert Blake 25.00 

Mrs. Luvia C. Turner 150.00 

Mrs. Emma F. Hemingway 100.00 

Fannie W. Burnham 100.00 

Mrs. Margaret McKittrick 50.00 

Isabelle & Harry L. Francis 100.00 

Mrs. Robena McDonald 100.00 

Mrs. J. Henry Prescott 100.00 

Edth M. Lambert 50.00 

Mrs. Lottie Bolton 100.00 

Mrs. Bertha D. Turple 100.00 

Mrs. Bertha D. Turple 100.00 

Mrs. Elizabeth D. BigeloW 100.00 

David Nebes 100.00 

Alfred E. Hamer, Admr 100.00 

Joseph H. Hibbard 50.00 

Harry M. Gumb 100.00 

John T. Clough 100.00 

Mrs. Alice H. Foust 25.00 

George F. Bradford ' 100.00 

Mrs. Jane Grady 50.00 

Mrs. Jane Muir 75.00 

Mrs. Gertrude L. Maker 100.00 

Louis A. Weiler 100.00 

Alfred Atkinson 100.00 

Robert J. Houston 100.00 

Mary E. Burrill 100.00 

John J. Harvey, Ex 100.00 

Maud Mountford 100.00 

Mrs. Louise T. Merrill 50.00 

Trs. Boston University 25.00 



108 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



Sarah G. Little 50.00 

Mrs. John G. Tucker 100.00 

Thomas Duckworth 200.00 

Thomas Duckworth 75.00 

Mrs. Annie Marshall 100.00 

Edward L. Googins 100.00 

Thomas Duckworth 100.00 

Thomas Duckworth 100.00 

Thomas Duckworth 25.00 

A. J. & Maud A. Thurston 100.00 

James G. Birtwell 100.00 

Hagop, Chetyian, Benjamin Ovaginian and 

Hagop Vartabedian 200.00 

Belle C. Hill 100.00 

Thomas Duckworth 50.00 

Mrs. Louis C. Playdon 100.00 

W Herbert Blake 100.00 

William Hall 100.00 

Ira Chellis 100.00 

William H. Saunders 75.00 

Gardner W. Pearson 100.00 

Victor and Gotthard Peterson 25.00 

Mrs. Andriette C. Tanner 100.00 

Charles H. Mclntyre 50.00 

Charles H. Mclntyre 50.00 

Mrs. Edith M. Lambert 50.00 

William Nelson 100.00 

Ella P. Mooney 50.00 

$ 10,600.00 

On hand December 31, 1925 $194,655.00 

Total amount in Principal Fund $194,655.00 

Accrued interest, undrawn 16,332.22 

Total amount invested $210,987.22 

The above amount is invested as follows: 

Old Lowell National Bank (Savings Dept.) $ 16,210.40 

Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank '. 20,978.79 

Washington Savings Institution 31,732.84 

City Istitution for Savings 22,290.02 

Lowell Institution for Savings 20,320.83 

Merrimack River Savings Bank 20,978.75 

Mechanics Savings Bank . 19,627.67 

Middlesex National Bank (Savings Dept.) 20,875.70 

Central Savings Bank 20,391.41 

Lowell Trust Co. (Savings Dept.) 13,955.81 

Wamesit National Bank (Savings Dept.) 3,625.00 



$210,987.22 



Respectfully submitted, 



FRED H. ROURKE, 

City Treasurer. 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 109 

ACCOUNT OF CITY TREASURER AND COLLECTOR 
OF TAXES FOR THE YEAR 1925 

Lowell, Mass., January 1, 1926. 
To the City Council of Lowell: 
Gentlemen: 

I have the honor to submit the following report of the Receipts and 
Expenditures of the City of Lowell for the financial year 1925: 
MONTHLY RECEIPTS AS FOLLOWS: 

January $ 269,997.43 

February 480,917.44 

March 505,961.63 

April 1,350.057.53 

May 570,568.82 

June 615,691.96 

July 447,150.01 

August 580,772.35 

September 504,052.80 

October 2,824,051.65 

November 1,118,572.47 

December 2,080,409.14 

$ 11,348,203.23 

Cash balance Jan. 1, 1925 371,896.51 

$ 11,720,099.74 



MONTHLY PAYMENTS AS FOLLOWS: 

January $ 248,542.17 

February 550,897.46 

March 581,076.86 

April 1,149,520.38 

May 620,802.38 

June "- 502,420.49 

July 591,201.40 

August 483,857.12 

September 403,875.58 

October 795,610.44 

November 3,351,113.64 

December 2,102,924.21 

$ 11,381,842.13 

Cash balance December 31, 1925 338,257.61 

$ 11,720,099.74 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED H. ROURKE, 
City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 



General Information 



PROPERTY OWNED BY CITY 
TABLES 
LOANS 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



111 



TOTAL VALUATION AND CITY DEBT, 1925 

REAL ESTATE AND PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE 
CITY OF LOWELL 



Items 



Land 


Furniture 


and 


and Other 


uildings 


Property 



Total 



City or Town Hall $ 614,550.00 $ 24,795.00 $ 639,345.00 

Police Department 134,550.00 35,959.00 170,509.00 

Fire Department 526.350.00 ,133,677.42 660,027.42 

Armory or Rifle Range 21,900.00 21,900.00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 900.00 900.00 

Moth Department 1,800.00 1,800.00 

Health Department: 

a. Contagious Disease Hosp. . . 273,500.00 10,000.00 283,500.00 

b. All other 1,185.00 1,185.00 

Sewer Department 20,575.00 20,575.00 

Refuse Disposal Plant and 

Equipment 11,625.00 11,625.00 

Garbage Disposal Plant and 

Equipment 3,875.00 3,875.00 

Street Cleaning Department 12,635.00 12,635.00 

Highway Department 67,336.00 67,336.00 

Almshouse or Farm 251,400.00 31,000.00 282,400.00 

Schools 4,537,390.00 83,050.00 4,620,440.00 

Libraries 362,550.00 90,000.00 452,550.00 

Parks, Playgrounds, Gymnasia, 

and Bathhouses 1,002,725.00 8,200.00 1,010,925.00 

Other Unproductive Properties: 

a. Lowell Memorial Auditorium 1,074,100.00 57,700.00 1,131,800.00 

b. Buildings Department 244,400.00 24,465.00 268,865.00 

c. Misc. Real Estate 10,525.00 10,525.00 

d. Weigher 275.00 275.00 

Electric Light Systems ,. . . 10;025.00 10,025.00 

Water Supply Systems 636,150.00 1,602,276.67 2,238,426.67 

Cemeteries 60,850.00 16,000.00 76,850.00 

Total Valuation $9,750,940.00 $2,247,354.09 $11,998,294.09 

Gross City Debt 5,894,670.00 



Excess in valuation of all city property over gross debt 

of City of Lowell $6,103,624.09 



112 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

PERSONAL PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY 
OF LOWELL 



Auditor: 

Furniture in office, etc $ 1,305.00 

Assessors: 

Furniture in office, etc 1,100.00 

Building's: 

Shop and storehouses 10,500.00 

Machinery, tools, etc 1,270.00 

Hardware 140.00 

Lumber 500.00 

School furnishings 2,000.00 

Election property 4,150.00 

Coffins, stock and tools 250.00 

Stable property 3,180.00 

Masons' stock and tools 60.00 

Pipers' stock 315.00 

Painters' stock and tools and unclassified 1,100.00 

Office property 1,000.00 

Cemetery 1 6,000.00 

Charity : 

Outdoor Relief 4,000.00 

Hospital 27,000.00 

City Clerk: 

Furniture in office, etc 550.00 

Election : 

Furniture in office, etc 7,500.00 

Engineer: 

Furniture in office, etc 2,560.00 

Tools and materials 2,900.00 

Fire Department: 

Chief's Office 7,619.32 

Repair Shop 579.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



113 



Fire Department— Continued 

Engine Co. No. 1, Gorham Street 

No. 2, Branch Street 

No. 3, Palmer Street 

No .4, High Street 

No. 5, Mammoth Road , 

No. 6, Fletcher Street 

Hose Co. No. 7, Central Street 

No. 8, Merrimack Street 

No. 9, Lincoln Street 

No. 10, Fourth Street . 

No. 11, Lawrence Street 

No. 12, West Sixth Street : '. 

Hook and Ladder, No. 1, Lawrecne Street 

No. 2, Westford Street 

No. 3, Palmer Street 

No. 4, West Sixth Street 

Protective No. 1, Warren Street 

Fire Alarm Telegraph 



8,767.13 
9,389.00 
7,773.30 
5,172.50 
2,950.90 
6,592.60 
2,566.95 
2,000.85 
2,539.13 
3,955.30 
1,966.60 
2,433.65 

2,429.25 
3,517.91 
5,169.55 
6,599.78 
4,327.70 
47,327.00 



Health: 

Furniture in office, etc 

Bacteriological Laboratory 
Milk and Vinegar Department 

Horses 

Wagons and Sleds 

Harnesses 

Shop . 



Isolation Hospital Equipment 



177.00 

148.00 

860.00 

7,000.00 

6,000.00 

1,000.00 

1,500.00 

10,000.00 



Law: 

Furniture in office, etc. 



License Commissioners 



500.00 
850.00 



Library 



90,000.00 



Mayor : 

Furniture in office, etc. 



Memorial Auditorium 
Moth 



800.00 

57,700.00 

1,800.00 



Messenger : 

Furniture in charge 
Boiler room 



1,300.00 
3,100.00 



114 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



Park: 

Furniture in office, etc. 
Stable and yard 



8,200.00 



Police : 

Furniture in office, etc 2.453.00 

Equipment 1,37?.' 

Stable 7,331.0 I 

Electrician's department 24,800.00 

Registrars : 

Furniture in office, etc 85.00 

Sealer 900.00 

Sewer : 

Office 725.00 

Miscellaneous 1 9,850.00 

Smoke Inspector 70.00 

State Aid: 

Furniture in office, etc 200.00 

Streets : 

Store room 4,070.00 

Yard 14,340.00 

Shop 2,000.00 

Stone 6,780.00 

Blacksmith Shop 890.00 

Tool House 568.00 

Dracut Ledge 14,700.00 

Horses and Harnesses 12,788.00 

Miscellaneous . . 2,200.00 

Street Watering: 

Carts, etc 12,635.00 

Street Lighting 10,025.00 

Supply: 

Furniture in office, etc 575.00 

Treasurer: 

Furniture in office, etc 1,000.00 

Water Works 1,602,276.67 

Weigher 275.00 

Wire 400.00 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 115 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT— Personal Estate 



Furniture in office, etc $ 1,150.00 

Four automobiles . . . 1,600.00 

Equipment in High School 10,000.00 

Equipment in Industrial School • • • •' 16,000.00 

Furniture in schools, etc 54,300.00 



Total Personal Property $ 2,247,354.09 



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CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT" 119 

MISCELLANEOUS REAL ESTATE 

Tenth Street In Lowell 40,260 sq. ft. $ 800.00 

Tenth Street in Dracut 175,985 sq. ft. 3,500.00 

Harris Land in Dracut 28 acres 600.00 

Parker Land in Dracut 20 acres 1,400.00 

Hildreth Land in Dracut 17 acres 500.00 

Meadow Land in Dracut 5 acres 275.00 

Swan Land in Dracut 5 acres 200.00 

S. S. Rogers St , 2.69 acres 300.00 

N. S. First St 57,768 sq. ft. 1,500.00 

Spruce St 17,457 sq. ft. 150.00 

W. S. Billerica Road 145,413 sq. ft. 400.00 

Clark Road 3 acres 900.00 

Total Miscellaneous Real Estate $10,525.00 



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130 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

HIGH STREET CHURCH CLOCK 

The clock v as built in 1SG1 under the direction of Mr. George 
Hedrick. It was to be paid for by popular subscription, but after some 
time Mr. Hedrick was obliged to make the final payments and it became 
his property. In 1877, the City Government, by resolution purchased 
the clock of Mr. Hedrick. The terms of the purchase required the City 
to keep it in repair at the High Street Church. 



PAYMENTS MADE TO SINKING FUNDS IN 1925 

Amount Fund 

New School Houses, due 1926 $ 4,000.00 $ 200,000.00 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION 

Personal Real-Estate Total 

Religious Institutions $ $ 3,006,350.00 $3,006,350.00 

Charitable Institutions 177,032.99 1.225,850.00 1,402,882.99 

Literary Institutions 122,771.25 1,358,895.00 1,481,666.25 

Benevolent Institutions 37,530.96 424,350.00 461,880.96 

Cemetery Institutions 3,585.99 45,850.00 49,435.99 

Scientific Institutions 1,247.90 9 450.00 10,697.90 



Totals $342,169.09 $6,070,745.00 $6,412,914.09 



Jonathan Tyler Worthy Poor Trust Fund 

Deposited with the Washington Inst, for Savings, Book No. 23549. 

Amount on deposit, January 1, 1918 $10,000.00 

Resolutions, numbered 14 and 74, passed by the City Council, May, 1878: 

"That the City of Lowell be appointed trustee of the sum of 
$10,000.00, and that the City Treasurer is authorized to pay to the 
Ministry-at-Large the interest of said sum at the rate of 6 per cent, 
forever. Said Sum to be used for the benefit of the worthy poor of the 
City. Said Ministry shall make an annual report of their dispensing said 
money to the City Council." This fund was restored in 1914, and City is 
paying 4 per cent only. 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 131 

Thomas Nesrni'h Fund 

$25,000.00. Annual Interest, $1,500.00 

Resolution, numbered 57, passed by the City Council, Novembe ■, 1870: 
"That the sum of $25,000.00 lie accepted by the City and that the 
interest, at the rate of 6 per cent, be paid to the trustees, and that 
they in turn pay to the Ministry-at- Large, or to like people, as they 
may decide. Said sum to be used for people in temporary need of 
charity without distinction of race, color, or religion. Trustees: 
A. K. Chadwick, A. G. Cumnock, Thos. Nesmith, G. R. Chandler, Treas- 
urer. In case of a vacancy, the remaining trustees shall report to the 
Justice of the Court, who shall appoint a successor to fill said va- 
cancy." This fund was restored in 1 923. 



Carney Medal Fund 

Received of James G. Carney, in 1858 and 1859, the amount of $200, 
which is to remain a perpetual debt of the City forever: the interest 
to be applied in payment for the "Carney Medals" to V e departments 
of the High School (annually). 

For the information of the citizens of Lowell the Auditor respectfully 
refers them to the "Annual Report of the School Committee," or the 
year 1859, where all the correspondence between th 3 donor and the 
recipient may be found. This fund was restored in 1f*23. 



Thomas Nesmith Fujnd 

Resolution, numbered 54, passed by the City Council, April, 1870: "That 
th» City of Lowell be appointed trustee of the «m of SI, 000. 00 and the 
City Treasurer is authorized to pay to the High Street Chureh tfee 
interest of said sum at the rate of 6 per cent, forever. Said sum to 
be used by the Pastor and Deacons of said Church to sustain the 
Sunday School and its library for the moral and re igious instruc- 
tion of the children." This fund was restored in 1923. 



132 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

LOANS NEGOTIATED BY THE CITY SINCE 1900 
AND HOW EXPENDED 



Year 


Loans 


Improvements 


Current Expenses 


Waters ays 


1900 


$ 28S.500.00 


$ 191,000.00 


$ 22,500.00 


$ 75,000.00 


1901 


256 100.00 


206,100.00 


50,000.00 




1902 


222,885.00 


186,385.00 


36,500.00 




1903 


387,320.00 


183,820.00 


203,500.00 




1904 


254,414.00' 


167,714.00 


86,700.00 




1905 


360,150.00 


232,150.00 


128,000.00 




1906 


247,460.00 


149,440:00 


71,000.00 


27,000.00 


1907 


365,500.00 


229,500.00 


136,000.00 




1908 


304,413.00 


189,413.00 


115.000.00 




1909 


172,900.00 


172,900.00 


none 




1910 


241,000.00 


161,000.00 


20.000.00 


60,000.00 


1911 


412,450.00 


251,450.00 


61,000.00 


100,000.00 


1912* 


546,700.00 


230,700.00 


241,000.00* 


75,000.00 


1913 


542,700.00 


320,700.00 


147,000.00 


75,000.00 


1914 


343,500.00 


235,500.00 


none 


15,000.00 


1915 


493,000.00 


34,300.00 


none 


225,000.00 


1916 


647,100.00 


592,100.00 


none 


55,000.00 


1917 


780,000.00 


780,000.00 


none 




1918 


177,000.00 


147,000.00 


30 OOO.OOt 




1919 


833,000.00 


753,000.00 


none 


80,000.00 


1920 


1,487,000.00 


1,472,000.00 


none 


15,000.00 


1921 


2,074,000.00 


2,074,000.00 


none 


30,000.00 


1922 


662,500.00 


662,500.00 


none 




1923 


451,700.00 


451,700.00 


none 




1924 


577,900.00 


577,900.00 


none 




1925 


431,000.00 


356,000.00 


none 


75,000.00 



*Temporary Loan Deficiencies of previous years — $200,000.00. 
t$15,000.00 — Spanish Influenza Epidemic; $15,000.00 German War. 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 133 

EXPENDITURES— TAX RATE— VALUATIONS 
FROM 1860 









Total 


Expenditures 


Year 


Tax Rate 


City Valuation 


$ 267,192.07 


1860 


$ 8.40 


$ 22,125,176.00 


756,342.81 


1S65 


14.60 


21,076,360.00 


778,636.03 


1870 


13.90 


25,972,488.00 


1,162,922.95 


1875 


16.20 


38,690.495.00 


1,398,683.48 


1880 


16.20 


41,102,016.00 


1,833,483.69 


1885 


16.20 


51,351,780.00 


3,613,584.04 


1890 


16.00 


62,353,612.00 


2,903,410.60 


1895 


18.00 


6S, 885, 732. 00 


2,353,844.41 


1900 


18.80 


71,529,515.00 


2,738,502.84 


1905 


20.20 


71,645,718.00 


2,795,000.75 


1906 


19.60 


74,945,640.00 


2,718,874.34 


1907 


19.40 


76,079,750.00 


3,046,987.96 


1908 


20.40 


77,855,891.85 


2,791,607.95 


1909 


19.60 


79,695,960.00 


2,887,399.24 


1910 


19.60 


80,392,890.00 


2,873,195.26 


1911 


18.90 


82,772,900.00 


2,847,482.13 


1912 


19.00 


85,384,085.00 


3,112,853.71 


1913 


19.40 


87,872,600.00 


3,093,197.15 


1914 


21.90 


90,039,890.00 


3,207,407.84 


1915 


20.80 


82,954,197.00 


3,443,043.82 


1916 


21.20 


94,503,423.00 


3,443,043.82 


1916 


21.20 


94,503,423.00 


3,835,043.80 


1917 


23.40 


90,820,901.50 


4,026,944.67 


1918 


23.80 


98,774,850.00 


4,462,739.28 


1919 


26.00 


107,269,813.00 


7,452,446.61 


1920 


27.20 


123,803,827.00 


7,490,450.02 


1921 


31.40 


128,610,023.00 


7,037,413.30 


1922 


30.60 


130,586,193.00 


6,404,603.76 


1923 


30.80 


136,492,851.00 


6,788,549.80 


1924 


29.40 


140,531,320.00 


7,042,676.11 


1925 


31.80 


145,404,663.00 



QLfyz Commontoealtf) of Jfla&Sadjusetts; 

DEPARTMENT OF CORPORATIONS AND TAXATION 



DIVISION OF ACCOUNTS 




REPORT 

OF AN AUDIT OF THE ACCOUNTS 

OF THE 

CITY OF LOWELL 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1925 

Made in Accordance with the Provisions of Chapter 44, General Laws. 



JUNE 9, 1926 



136 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



June 9, 1926. 

To the Honorable John J. Donovan, Mayor, 
and the Municipal Council, 
Lowell, Massachusetts. 

Gentlemen : 

I submit herewith my report of an audit of the accounts of the 
City of Lowell for the year ending December 31, 1925, made in accord- 
ance with the provisions of Chapter 44 of the General Laws. This report 
is in the form of a report made to me by Mr. Edward H. Penton, Chief 
Examiner of this Division. 

Very truly youra, 

THEODORE N. WADDELL, 
TNWlAMH Director of Accounts. 



Mr. Theodore N. Waddell, 
Director of Accounts, 

Department of Corporations and taxation, 
State House, Boston. 

Sir: 

In accordance with your instructions, I have made an audit of the 
books and accounts of the City of Lowell for the year ending December 
31, 1925, and submit the following report thereon: — 

The financial transactions of the city, as recorded on the books of 
the several departments, were checked and compared with the books 
in the auditor's office. 

The surety bonds furnished by the departmental officials for the 
faithful performance of their duties were examined and found to be in 
proper form. 

The books and accounts in the auditor's office were examined and 
checked; the records of receipts were checked with the treasurer's 
books and with the records in the several departments collecting money 
for the city. The reported disbursements were checked with the treas- 
ury warrants authorizing the payment of money and with the treasurer's 
cash book. 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 137 



The appropriation accounts were examined and all appropriations, 
transfers and loan orders were checked with the records of the City Coun- 
cil. 

The accounts receivable ledger, in which is entered the detail of the 
departmental accounts receivable, was examined and checked with the bills 
made out by the several departments and with the payments to the 
treasurer. 

The records of debt issued were examined and the loans were found 
to be properly authorized. The reported payments on account of debt 
and interest were compared with the amounts falling due, and the out- 
standing debt was listed from the debt record and proved with the 
auditor's ledger. 

The ledger accounts were examined and checked, a trial balance was 
taken off, proving the ledger to be in balance, and a balance sheet, show- 
ing the financial condition of the city as of December 31, 1925, was pre- 
pared and is appended to this report. 

The books and accounts of the treasurer and collector were exam- 
ined and checked. The reported receipts as recorded on the cash book 
were checked with the reports to the auditor and the departmental rec- 
ords, and the payments by the treasurer were compared with the war- 
rants authorizing them and with the auditor's books. 

The cash on hand was verified by an actual count, and the bank 
balances were reconciled with the statements furnished by the banks. 

The commitments of taxes, assessments and departmental charges 
were proved to the warrants, and the receipts were checked with the 
payments to the treasurer and with the auditor's books. The abatements 
were checked with the departmental reports of abatements granted, 
and the outstanding accounts were listed and proved to the accounts in 
the auditor's books. A further verification of the outstanding accounts 
was made by mailing notices to a number of persons whose names ap- 
peared on the books as owing money to the city, and from the replies 
received I am satisfied that the outstanding accounts as listed are cor- 
rect. Abatements should be obtained from the departments for the de- 
partmental bills which have been determined as uncollectible. 

The receipts of the city clerk's department for licenses and permits 
were checked in detail with the rcords of licenses and permits issued 
and the fees for recording were verified by the records in the several 
books. The payments to the treasurer were compared with the treas- 
urer's and the auditor's books. 

The hunting and fishing licenses and the dog licenses issued were 
examined, and the payments to the state and the county were verified 
by the receipts on file. 

The receipts of the license commissioners were examined and 
checked. The records of licenses issued were checked with the copies 
of licenses on file, and the payments to the treasurer were compared 
with the treasurer's and the auditor's books. 

The records of the receipts of the library department were exam- 
ined and checked, the payments to the treasurer being compared with 
the treasurer's and the auditor's books. At the end of the year there 
was $84.75 cash on hand, this amount being paid to the treasurer in 
January and February, 1926. 



13S CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



The financial records of tho water department were examined, the 
abatements and discounts being checked and the outstanding accounts 
listed and proved with the auditor's books. The reported collections 
were checked with the treasurer's and the auditor's books. 

The records of cash received at the cemetery office were checked 
and the payments to the treasurer were comapred with the treasurer's 
and the auditor's books. 

The records of receipts from the milk inspector, the sealer of 'weights 
and measures, the public scales and the vocati ma] schools, as well as 
from the building, fire, health and park department , were examined 
and the payments to the treasurer were checked with the treasurer's 
and the auditor's books. 

In addition to the departments and accounts mentioned, the accounts 
of all other deartments receiving money or committing bills for co. lection 
were examined and checked. 

The investments of the sinking and trust funds were- examined and 
listed and the additional cemetery perpetual care funds wei e ve ified and 
the income proved, all of which was found to be correct. 

Recommendations were made in oar report of tho previous audit 
that a special appropriation be made to take care of the deficit of water 
income. No action was taken, however, and, as the water department 
receipts for last year were not sufficient to meet the expenditures of the 
department, the deficit was increased, making the amount at the close 
of the year $49,731.27. This matter shojll r ceive a'tntion, instead of 
leaving it to chance that there would be an unexpended balance of water 
income to reduce it. 

Although the surplus revenue represented by the "Prior Revenue" 
account shows an increase over the amount shown in the last audit re- 
port, it must be considered that this account is repre: ented by uncollect- 
ed taxes, departmental bills and other accounts receivable, some of which 
are probably of no value or of doubtful value. Appropriations for ex- 
penditure of cash, therefore, should not be made from the surplus rev- 
enue until the cash is available by collection of th? accounts which 
represent it. 

Careful consideration should also be giv n to the department appro- 
priations before the tax rate is fixed for 1 9 2 r i , and if it is found that 
any appropriations are not sufficient for the requirements of the de- 
partments for the balance of the year, additional appropriations should 
be made, to be raised in the revenue of th" current year, otherwise the 
work should be curtailed. 

Appended to this report are tables showing a reconciliation of the 
treasurer's cash, summaries of the tax, assessment, and departmental ac- 
counts receivable, together with tables showing the transactions of the 
sinking and trust funds. 

For the co-operation and courtesy extend :d by every departmental 
official during the process of the audit, I wish, on behalf of my assist- 
ants and for myself, to express appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDW. H. FENTON, 
EHFIAMH Chief Examiner. 



OTTY AUDITOR'S REPORT 139 

RECONCILIATION OF TREASURER'S CASH 

Cash on hand January 1, 1925 $ 371,896.51 

Receipts 1925 11,348,203.23 

$11,720,099.74 



Payments 1925 $11,381,842.13 

Cash on hand December 31, 1925 S8S.257.G1 

$11,720,099.74 



Cash on hand January 1, 1926 $ 338,257.61 

Receipts January 1 to March 29, 1926 1,527,894.13 

$ 1,866,151.74 



Payments January 1 to March 29, 19£6 $ 1,326,111.68 

Cash on hand March 29, 1926 540,040.06 

— $ 1,866,151.74 



Cash in office March 29, 1926: 

Bills $ 16,442.00 

Coin 782.60 

Checks 5,843.74 

$ 23,068.34 



Cash in banks March 29, 1926: 

Lowell Trust Company 157,140.27 

Union National Bank 109,911.51 

Old Lowell National Bank 180.910.09 

Middlesex National Bank S, 549. 05 

Appleton National Bank 27,050.39 

Wamesit National Bank 29,422.17 

First National Bank, Boston 2,737.41 

Union National Bank (Special) 1,250.83 

$ 516,971.72 

$ 540,040.06 



140 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



RECONCILIATION OF BANK BALANCES- 
MARCH 29, 1926 



Balances Outstanding Balances 

Per Bank Checks Per Check 

Statements Per Lists Register 



Lowell Trust Company $157,860.57 

Union National Bank 128,749.78 

Old Lowell National Bank 181,752.59 

Middlesex National Bank 11,314.79 

Appleton National Bank 27,050.39 

Wamesit National Bank 29,422.17 

First National Bank Boston 2,737.41 

Union National Bank (Special) 1,250.83 



720.30 $157,140.27 

18,838.27 109,911.51 

842,50 180,910.09 

2,765.74 8,549.05 

27,050.39 

29,422.17 

2,737.41 
1,250.83 



TAXES— 1919 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 

Payments to Treasurer, 1925 

Abatements, 1925 



82.73 
331.97 



$540,138.53 $23,166.81 $516,971.72 



TAXES- 


-1915 










$ 


408.72 






$ 


408.72 









414.70 



414.70 



TAXES— 1920 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 

Payments to Treasurer, 1925 

Abatements, 1925 



150.96 
21.76 



172.72 



172.72 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 141 

TAXES— 1921 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 $ 2,989.28 

Payments to Treasuerr, 1925 $ 1,469.52 

Abatements, 1925 1,519.76 

$ 2,989.28 

TAXES— 1922 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 $ 58,996.15 

Adjustments: 

Overpayments 69.00 

Taxes paid and abated 17.00 

Duplicate and excess abatements 15.18 

To reconcile ledger account with out- 
standing detailed list 14.18 

$ 59,111.51 

Payments to Treasurer $ 6,183.93 

Abatements 51,289.44 

Outstanding December 31, 1925 1,638.14 

$ 59,111.51 

Outstanding January 1, 1926 $ 1,638.14 

Payments to Treasurer January 1 to March 

29, 1926 , .$ 98.61 

Abatements January 1 to March 29, 1926 27.00 

Outstanding March 29, 1926, per list $ 1,512.53 

$ 1,638.14 

TAXES— 1923 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 : $ 95,190.47 

Payments to Treasurer $ 9,640.21 

Abatements 1,182.20 

Outstanding December 31, 1925 84,368.06 

$ 95,190.47 

Outstanding January 1, 1926 $ 84,368.06 

Overpayments — not refunded 72.00 

Unlocated difference 4.00 

$ 84,444.06 

Payments to treasurer January 1 to March 29, 

1926 - $ 2,283.50 

Abatements January 1 to March 29, 1926 22.00 

Outstanding March 29, 1926, per list 82,138.56 

$ 84,444.06 



142 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 

TAXES— 1924 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 $1,186,501.33 

Re-assessments i 139.65 

$1,186,640.98 

I' 'yments to Treasurer $1,118,188.38 

Abatements 14,256.67 

Outstanding- December 31, 1925 54,195.93 

$1,186,640.98 

Outstanding January 1, 1926 $ 54,195.93 

Overpayments — not refunded 96.93 

Unlocated difference 3.00 

$ 54,295.86 

Payments to Treasurer January ] to 

March 29, 1926 $ 1,003.13 

Abatements January 1 to March 29. 19 !6 12.00 

Outstanding March 29, 1926, per !ist 53 280.73 - 

$ 54,295.86 



TAXES— 1925 

Commitment $4,685,640.77 

Additional Commitment $ 1,338.96 

$4,686,979.73 

Payments to Treasurer $3,265,434.42 

Abatements 11,040.30 

Outstanding December 31, 1925 1,410,505.01 

$4,686,979.73 

Outstanding January 1, 1926 $1,410,505.01 

Overpayments — not refunded 163.83 

Unlocated difference 10.41 

$1,410,679.25 

Payments to Treasurer January 1 to March 

29, 1926 $ 447,533.76 - 

Abatements January 1 to March 29, 1926 8,660.93 

Outstanding March 29, 1926, per list 954,484.56 

$1,410,679.25 



STREET SPRINKLING ASSESSMENTS— 1915 

( >utstanding January 1 , 1925 $ 4.10 

Abatements. 1925 4.10 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 143 

STREET SPRINKLING ASSESSMENTS— 1922 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 $ 34.00 

Payments to Treasurer $ 7. 62 

Outstanding December 31, 1925, per list 26.38 

$ 34.00 

STREET SPRINKLING ASSESSMENTS— 1923 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 $ 72.09 

Payments to Treasurer $ 44.35 

Outstanding December 31, 1925, per list 27.74 

$ 72.09 

STREET SPRINKLING ASSESSMENTS— 1924 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 $ 8,940.11 

Payments to Treasurer $ 8.S92.15 

Abatements 32.32 

Outstanding December 31, 1925, per list 15.64 

$ 8,940.11 

STREET SPRINKLING ASSESSMENTS— 1925 

Commitment $ 25.513.13 

Payments to Treasurer $ 16,325.69 

A batements 26.10 

Outstanding December 31, 1925 . . 9,161.34 

$ 25,513.13 

Outstanding January 1, 1926 9,161.34 

Overpayments — not refunded 3.07 

= $ 9,164.41 

Payments to Treasurer January 1 to March 

29, 1926 $ 2,180.11 

Abatements January 1 to March 29. 1926 3.17 

Outstanding March 29, 1926, per list , . 6,981.13 

$ 9,164.41 

MOTH ASSESSMENTS— 1922 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 $ 12.45 

Outstanding December 31, 1925. per list 12.45 

MOTH ASSESSMENTS— 1923 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 $ 4.55 

Payments to Treasurer $ 2.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1925, per list 2.55 

$ 4.55 



144 CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 



MOTH ASSESSMENTS— 1924 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 $ 1,225.40 

Payments to Treasurer $ 1,222.40 

Abatements .40 

Outstanding December 31, 1925, per list 2.60 



$ 1,225.40 



MOTH ASSESSMENTS— 1925 



Commitment $ 3,122.00 

Payments to Treasurer $ 2,280.40 

Outstanding December 31, 1925 841.60 

■ $ 3,122.00 

Outstanding January 1, 1926 $ 841.60 

Payments to Treasurer January 1 to March 

29, 1926 $ 177.20 

Abatements January 1 to March 29, 1926 .30 

Outstanding March 29, 1926, per list 664.10 

$ 841.60 

SEWER ASSESSMENTS 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 $ 4,109.24 

Commitments 15,228.02 

Payments to Treasurer 12,211.23 

Abatements 673.88 

Outstanding December 31, 1925 6,452.15 

$ 19,337.26 

Outstanding January 1, 1926 $ 6,452.15 

Payments to Treasurer January 1 to March 

29, 1926 . : $ 349.95 

Outstanding March 29, 1926, per list 6,102.20 



$ 19, 33?. 26 



6,452.15 



SIDEWALK ASSESSMENTS 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 $ 2,798.88 

Commitments 12,982.16 

Re-assessments 150.38 

Payments to Treasurer $ 10,207.57 

Abatements 456.43 

Outstanding December 31, 1925 5,267.42 



$ 15,931.42 



15,931.42 



Outstanding January 1, 1926 $ 5,267.42 

Payments to Treasurer January 1 to March 

29, 1926 $ 85.06 

Outstanding March 29, 1926, per list 5,182.36 

$ 5,267.42 



CITY AUDITOR'S REPORT 145 

DEPARTMENTAL ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
Comimittd Accounts 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 $ 262,070.15 

Commitments 245,272.32 

$ 507,342.47 

Payments to Treasurer $ 333,523.30 

Abatements 4,565.94 

Outstanding- December 31, 1925 169,253.23 

$ 507,342.47 

WATER DEPARTMENT ACCOUNTS™ 

Outstanding January 1, 1925 $ 7,465.62 

Commitments $ 480,012.51 

$ 487,478.13 

Payments to Treasurer $ 3S6.984.32 

Abatements 76,667.99 

DiscouiKs 16,656.93 

Adjustment of outstanding accounts . . 1.02 

Outstanding December 31, 1925 7,167.87 

$ 487,478.13 

Outstanding January 1, 1926 $ 7,167.87 

Commitment January 1 to April 30, 1926 137,015.91 

$ 144,183.78 

Payments to Treasurer January 1 to April 

30, 1926 $ 112,909.82 

Abatements January 1 to April 30, 1926 1,141.60 

Abatement to be reported 12.20 

Discounts January 1 to April 30, 1926 5,039.76 

CJnlocated difference 20.57 

Outstanding April 30, 1926, per list 25,059.83 

$ 144,183.78 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT ACCOUNTS" 
RECEIVABLE 

Outstanding January l' 1925 $ 3,064.99 

Commitments 25,464.94 

Adjustment of abatements 20.50 

$ 28,550.43 

Payments to Treasurer $ 18,374.98 

Abatements 126.98 

Transferred from Charity Department 36.00 

Outstanding December 31, 1925 10,012.47 

$ 28,550.43 

Outstanding January 1, 1926 $ 10,012.47 

Commitment January 1 to April 7, 1926 2,630.00 

$ 12,642.47 

Payments to Treasurer January 1 to April 

7, 1926 $ 6,727.00 

Commitment in excess of charge 5.00 

Unlocated difference 12.50 

Outstanding April 7, 1926, per list 5,897.97 

$ 12,642.47 



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INDEX 



Page 

Accountant's Report 135 

Assessments — Year 1925 8 

Auditor's Report by Departments . . • • 39 

Auditor's Balance Sheet 9-10 

Auditor's Debt Statement ■■ . . 11-12 

Cemetery — Perpetual Care Fund 106 

City Government — 1925 ■ ■ 3 

Debt Maturing — 1925 129 

Financial Statement • ■ 30-37 

High Street Church Clock 130 

Loans •• 12-132 

Lowell Statistics . 4 

Ordinances . . • • 5 

Payments — Classified 20-28 

Property Exempt from Taxation •• . ...130 

Property Owned by City Valuation 111-128 

Receipts — Classified ■ • . . 14-19 

Sinking Funds •-..'. 77-102-103-104-130 

Tax Rates 133 

Tax Levy . ■• 7 

Tax Distribution 7 

Treasurer's Report • • 109 

Trust Funds 102-105-106-130-131 

By Accounts 

Animal Inspection 40 

Annuities 40 

Ashes and Waste 40 

Assessors 41 

Auditor '' 41 

Auditing Municipal Accounts 83 

Auditorium Maintenance 42 

Band Concerts 43 



Page 
Bridges 

Beaver Brook .43 

Gentralville 43 

Construction 90 

Repairs 44 

Repairs — Special . 44 

Resurfacing Central Bridge 73 

Budget and Auditing Commission 44 

Buildings 45 

Buildings — Special : 46 

Cemeteries : 46 

Charity 

Chelmsford Street Hospital . 47 

Mothers with Dependent Children .67 

Out Door Relief . 67 

City Hall 48 

Civic Employment 49 

Claims • -49 

Clerk 50 

Comfort Station — North Common . . .-. 50 

Comfort Station 50 

Councillors . ; 51 

Debt 51 

Dedication of Squares and Memorials 52 

Durkee House ....•• 52 

Elections 52 

Elections — Special ■ • 53 

Engineering Dept. 54 

Fire 

General 54 

Equipment Loan 90 

Oakland Fire House - 92 

Fish and Game Warden 55 

Fourth of July 55 

General Expense 56 



>-j Page 

Health 

Isolation Hospital .• 60 

Milk and Vinegar .56 

Office 57 

Permanent Camp for Children 59 

School Hygiene . 57 

Yard 58 

Insurance 59 

Interest- — Current .59 

Interest Fixed Charge . . 59 

Labor Day .60 

Labor Registrar . . . 61 

Library ... 61 

Library — John Davis Fund 62 

License Commission . . .62 

Liquor License 62 

Lowell Centennial Celebration 63 

Macadamizing 

General 91 

Special 91 

Standish Street 92 

Mayor 63 

Memorial Auditorium . ■". . . ..... 92 

Memorial Auditorium — Additional Loan 92 

Memorial Day 

American Legion 63 

D. W. V 64 

F. W. V. 64 

G. A. R '. 64 

Navy Club 65 

S. of V 65 

S. W. V 65 

World War Assn 66 

Messenger 66 

Moth Extermination 66 



Page 

Parks 

Anne Street 92 

Ayer Field * 92 

General . .68 

New Construction 69 

Paving 

General 93 

Bridge Street 94 

Lakeview Avenue 94 

Lawrence Street 95 

Stevens Street . 95 

Riverside Street 93 

Planning Board 69 

Playgrounds 

Centralville 96 

General 95 

Morey Street 96 

O'Donnell, John J 96 

Shedd — Special 70 

South Lowell 70 

Police Department 70 

Pound Keeper 71 

Preparing, Certifying and Marketing Bonds 71 

Public Bath and Comfort Station 97 

Public Service Board 71 

Purchasing Agent's Dept 72 

Revision of Ordinances 73 

Rifle Range 73 

School 

General 74 

Textile School 83 

Vocational 75 

School Houses — General 97 

Smith-Hughes Fund . . . . , 75 

New High . . 97 

Sealer . . 76 



Sewer Pa § e 

Construction 97 

Maintenance .80 

Oakland Main 98 

Sinking Fund .77 

Smoke Inspection 77 

Soldier's Benefits 78 

Soldier's Graves '. .... 78 

Solicitor .79 

Streets 

First Street Extension ' 90 

Hall and Aiken Widening 91 

Lighting 79 

Maintenance .76 

Sidewalks — New .77 

Street Sprinkling 81 

Sprinkling — Special .81 

Taxes 

Civilian War Poll 82 

Corporation 82 

County 82 

Investigation Sewerage in Concord River 82 

Investigation Sewerage in Merrimack River 82 

National Bank 82 

Non-Resident Bank 83 

State 83 

State Audit-Municipal Accounts 83 

Soldier's Exemption 83 

State Highway 83 

Treasurer 

Treasurer and Collector's 84 

Special ..84 

Unsatisfied Judgment 85 

Water Works 85 

Water Main Loan 1925 99 

Weigher 86 

Wire 86 

Workmen's Compensation .87 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Births, Marriages 
and Deaths 

OF THE 

CITY OF LOWELL 




FOR THE YEAR 

1925 



CITY OF LOWELL 



OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK, May 11, 1926 

To the City Council, 

Gentlemen : 

The annual report of Births, Marriages and Deaths for 
the year 1925, as of record in the office of the City Clerk is respect- 
fully submitted as follows: 

BIRTHS 

Total number recorded, exclusive of Still-births is 2773, 
of which 170 occured in Lowell the parents being residents else- 
where, and 66 occuring elsewhere the parents being residents of 
Lowell. Following is a table by wards, of births occuring in Lowell 
the parents being Lowell residents. 

Wards 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Total 



Whole 
Number 


218 


386 


152 


187 


276 


277 


343 


115 


152 


277 


154 


2537 


Males 


112 


194 


76 


92 


146 


129 


168 


61 


82 


151 


84 


1295 


Females 


106 


192 


76 


95 


130 


148 


175 


54 


70 


126 


70 


1242 


Born of Amer- 
ican Parents 


99 


123 


81 


102 


98 


116 


136 


81 


85 


102 


90 


1113 


Foreign born 
Parents 


74 


212 


28 


43 


92 


64 


102 


12 


28 


129 


26 


810 


American Fath 
Foreign Moth 


er 25 

er 


20 


24 


31 


49 


54 


58 


11 


19 


21 


18 


330 


Foreign Father o() 
American Mother 


31 


19 


11 


37 


43 


47 


11 


20 


25 


20 


284 


Twins 


3 


5 


1 


3 


1 


3 




2 


2 


1 


2 


23 


Still-births 


117 

























ANNUAL REPORT 

MARRIAGES 

Nine hundred and sixty-five marriages were recorded in 
1925, eight hundred and thirty-three being solemnized in Lowell 
(which was twenty-five less than in 1924) and one hundred and 
thirty-two solemnized elsewhere 

MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 

January 49 May 69 September 110 

February 64 June 147 October 93 

March 34 July 76 November 95 

April 92 August 86 December 50 

NATIONALITY OF CONTRACTING PARTIES 

Grooms Brides 

United States 652 698 

Canada 120 110 

Greece 47 42 

Russia, Poland, Austria 33 21 

Portugal, Azores, Madeira 26 23 

England 27 20 

Ireland 18 27 

Scotland 8 8 

Armenia 7 3 

Italy 4 3 

Other Countries 22 11 

Grooms under 21 years, 63 Brides under 18 years, 38 

DEATHS 

Total deaths recorded in 1925 was one thousand six hun- 
dred and fifty-nine, of which one hundred and two were non-res- 
idents who died in Lowell, and one hundred and five residents 
who died elsewhere. 

Detailed statistics relative to deaths are contained in Re- 
port of Board of Health. 

Respectfully submitted, 

STEPHEN FLYNN, 

City Clerk. 
In City Council May 11, 1926. 

Read and ordered on file. 

STEPHEN FLYNN, 

City Clerk. 



Table of number of Births, Marriages and Deaths in 
Lowell in five year periods since its incorporation as a town in 1826. 



Year 


Population 


Births 


Marriages 


Deaths 


1826-1843 




Est. 5010 


Est. 4500 


Est. 4186 


1844 


25163 


662 


319 


362 


1846 


29127 


772 


59] 


690 


1850 


33383 


966 


674 


492 


1855 


37554 


1039 


687 


766 


1860 


36827 


1077 


497 


720 


1865 


30990 


672 


406 


575 


1870 


40928 


926 


515 


952 


1875 


49688 


1296 


513 


1020 


1880 


59485 


1770 


744 


1312 


1885 


64107 


1769 


707 


1328 


1890 


77696 


2175 


979 


1960 


1895 


84359 


2772 


978 


1898 


1900 


94969 


2574 


1135 


1852 


1905 


94889 


2513 


981 


1899 


1910 


106294 


2609 


1065 


2100 


1915 


107978 


2894 


1008 


1820 


1920 


112759 


3099 


1423 


1854 


1925 


110542 


2603 


965 


1662 



FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



OF THE 



CITY OF LOWELL 




FOR THE YEAR 

1925 



BUCKLAND PTG. CO. 
67 MIDDLE ST.. LOWELL. MASS. 



ORGANIZATION 1925 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



FRANCIS R. MAHONEY, M. D., Chairman 
PIERRE BRUNELLE, M. D. 

FISHER H. PEARSON to April 27, 1925, succeeded by 
JAMES H. ROGERS, O. D. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT OFFICERS 

FRANCIS J. O'HARE, Agent. 

SPENCER BROWN, Fumigator. 

JOHN N. DRURY, M. D., Tuberculosis Physician. 

WILLIAM A. JOHNSON, M. D., Vaccinating Physician. 

HAROLD L. LELAND, M. D., Attending Physician G. U. Clinic. 

JAMES Y. RODGER, M. D., Bacteriologist 

KATHARINE W. SNOW, Registrar. 

MARY A. WHITE, Clerk. 

BERTHA M. KIRWIN, R. N., Tuberculosis Nurse. 

GRACE M. CARROLL, R. N., Tuberculosis Nurse. 

ALICE I. GORMAN, R. N., Child Welfare Nurse. 

MARIE A. GOUDREAU, R. N., Child Welfare Nurse. 

MARGUERITE R. HIGGINS, R. N., Child Welfare Nurse. 

PAULINE PICARD, R. N., Child Welfare Nurse. 

CATHERINE SULLIVAN, R. N., Child Welfare Nurse. 

LOIS A. TITCOMB, R. N., G. U. Clinic Nurse. 

NAPOLEON MILOT, R. N., G. U. Clinic Nurse. 



INSPECTORS 

WILLIAM H. CONNORS, General Inspector. 

CHARLES N. MIDWOOD, Plumbing Inspector. 

WILLIAM I. RYAN, Plumbing Inspector. 

JOHN KEARNEY, Health Inspector. 

CLEMENT A. HAMBLET, Inspector of Meats and Provisions. 

MILK DEPARTMENT 

MELVIN F. MASTER, B. S., Milk Inspector. 
AUGUSTUS McKEON, Collector of Samples. 
LOUIS DESCHENEAUX, Technician. 



DIVISION OF SCHOOL HYGIENE 

FRANCIS A. FINNEGAN, M. D., Director. 
CHESTER STOYLE BAKER, M. D., School Physician. 
JOHN F. BOYLE, M. D., School Physician. 
JAMES J. CASSIDY, M. D., School Physician. 
WINNIFRED W. DEVINE, M. D., School Physician. 
GEORGE O. LAVALLEE, M. D., School Physician. 
RODRIGUE MIGNAULT, M. D., School Physician. 
FREDERICK P. MURPHY, M. D., School Physician. 
HAROLD B. PLUNKETT, M. D., School Physician. 
CHARLES M. ROUGHAN, M. D., School Physician. 
EMMA Y. SLAUGHTER, M. D., School Physician. 
EDWARD O. TABOR, M. D., School Physician. 
FREDERICK F. DONOHOE, School Dentist. 
PATRICK J. MULLANE, School Dentist. 
EVA LANTAGNE, School Dentists' Assistant. 
MARGARET CRAIG, R. N., School Nurse. 
MARY DOUGLASS, R. N., School Nurse. 
MARIETTA DWYER, R. N., School Nurse. 
SARAH FOX, School Nurse. 
MARIETTA FRAZIER, R. N., School Nurse. 
MARY FITZPATRICK, R. N v School Nurse. 
JOSEPHINE LECLAIR, R. N., School Nurse. 
ROSE V. LETTRELL, R. N., School Nurse. 
CLARINA MORIER, R. N., School Nurse. 
ANNA O'DWYER, R. N., School Nurse. 



ISOLATION HOSPITAL 

FORSTER H. SMITH, M. D„ Superintendent 
STELLA M. SMITH, R. N., Superintendent of Nurses. 
HELENE M. MORRIS, Clerk. 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. 1st, 1926 

To the Honorable Mayor and Members of the Municipal 
Council of the City of Lowell. 

Gentlemen : 

The forty-eighth annual report of the BOARD OF 
HEALTH for the year ending Dec. 31, 1925, is respectfully 
submitted. 

The total number of deaths in Lowell for the. year 
1925 numbered 1554 or nine more than for the year 1924, 
making a death rate of 13.78 per 1000 (based on population 
of 112,759) against 13.70 in 1924. These figures include 
deaths of non-residents, but exclude Stillbirths. 

INFANT MORTALITY 

The deaths of infants under one year of age for the 
year 1925 numbered 230 (against 275 in 1924) and represents 
an infant mortality rate of 82.9 (against 91.02 in 1924). This 
rate is based on 2773 Recorded Births, and is the lowest infant 
mortality rate available in the history of Lowell. It is 
very gratifying to note this substantial death rate as com- 
pared with previous years, and these results may be attributed 
to the educational work of the department nurses, and other 
allied organizations interested in Infant Welfare Work. 
When we consider that the Department has no Baby Welfare 
Clinics of any description, except the privilege of referring 
cases to the Lowell Guild, we feel that the results obtained 
are very creditable. 

The Deaths of Children from One to Five Years in 1925 
were 115 against 72 in 1924. 



6 ANNUAL REPORT 

DISEASES DANGEROUS TO PUBLIC HEALTH 

TUBERCULOSIS 

151 cases of tuberculosis (against 188 cases in 1924) 
were reported during- the year, and of this number 117 
(against 153 in 1924) were Pulmonary Tuberculosis and 34 
(35 in 1924) were All Other Forms of the Disease. The 
death rate .79 (.99 in 1924) per thousand of the population 
was considerably lower than during the previous year. 

This is also a very creditable showing and is due in 
a great measure to the work of the department nurses, and 
the nurse supplied by the Lowell Tuberculosis Council, who 
by persistent effort, endeavor to hospitalize all active cases 
living under unfavorable conditions at home, as well as to 
have contacts (particularly children) examined regularly at 
the Tuberculosis Clinic. 

DIPHTHERIA 

50 cases of diphtheria (against 113 in 1924) were 
reported for the year with four (4) deaths (10 in 1924) 
making a mortality rate of 8% total cases, which v/as the 
same as during the previous year. 

The great decrease in the incidence of dipthheria for 
the year 1925 compared 'with the previous year was very 
noticeable, and was the lowest record for many years. It 
is the opinion of many experts in the public health service 
that if infants were immunized against Diphtheria soon after 
they are six months of age, and also children up to six years, 
it would be only a few years when this disease would be 
eradicated. 

SCARLET FEVER 

265 cases of Scarlet Fever against 135 in 1924 were 
reported with 3 deaths (against 1 death in 1924). 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



TYPHOID FEVER 



10 cases of Typhoid Fever (14 in 1924) were reported 
with No Deaths in 1925 (against 2 deaths in 1924). 

The year 1925 stands out very prominently -in Public 
Health Work, as it was the first year within the history 
of the City of Lowell that there were no deaths from Typhoid 
Fever. For the past three years previous, the morbidity 
and mortality rate for this dreaded disease has been very 
low, and has been cited in many public health reports. 

OTHER CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 

1954 cases of Measles (205 in 1924) were reported 
during the year with 13 deaths (none in 1924). 

6 cases of Infantile Paralysis (against 15 in 1924) were 
reported with 2 deaths in 1925 (against 1 death in 1924). 

6 cases of Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis (against 4 in 1924) 
were reported, with 4 deaths each year. 

98 cases of Lobar Pneumonia (61 in 1924) were 
reported with 53 deaths (against 30 deaths in 1924). 

48 cases of Whooping Cough (31 in 1924) were reported 
with no deaths in 1925 (against 3 deaths in 1924). 

The total deaths from all diseases dangerous to 
Public Health were 174 (against 171 in 1924) or a fraction 
over 11% of the Total Mortality. 

The Board wishes to express its appreciation of the 
cooperation given by other municipal departments, and also 
to acknowledge the assistance given by the Lowell Tuber- 
culosis Council, the Lowell Guild, and other social welfare 
organizations. 

FRANCIS R. MAHONEY, M. D., Chairman 
PIERRE BRUNELLE, M. D. 
JAMES H. ROGERS, O. D. 

Board of Health. 



8 ANNUAL REPORT 

REPORT OF BACTERIOLOGIST 

Lowell, Mass., Jan. 1st, 1926. 
Board of Health. 

Gentlemen : 

Following is a report of work done by me in the 

Bacteriological Laboratory during the year 1925 : 



DIPHTHERIA 
Examination of Cultures 



DIAGNOSIS 



RELEASE 



Positive Negative Positive Negative No. Result Total 



Jan 7 63 1 16 

Feb 4 65 5 

Mar 2 38 9 

Apr 1 49 1 

May 3 46 7 

June 1 35 5 

Julv 2 15 1 4 

Auk 2 18 1 

Sept 4 129 4 

Oct 1 47 1 4 

Nov 2 45 2 

Dec 5 70 3 



34 



620 



61 



? 


89 


2 


76 





49 


1 


52 


1 


57 


1 


42 





22 





21 





137 


1 


54 


1 


50 





78 



727 



TYPHOID FEVER 

Examination for Widal Reactions 

Positive Negative Suspicious No Good Total 

Jan 3 3 

Feb 1 1 

Mar 2 1 3 

Apr 2 2 

Mav 1 1 

June 3 3 

July 2 2 

Aug. - 1 3 4 

Sept 4 4 

Oct 1 ' 1 

Nov 4 1 5 

Dec 1 1 2 



1 



27 



1 



31 



BOARD OF HEALTH ^ 

TUBERCULOSIS 
Examination of Sputum 

Positive Negative No. Result Total 

Jan 8 23 1 32 

Feb ..... 18 16 1 35 

Mar 4 33 2 39 

Apr 5 20 1 26 

May 4 36 40 

June 5 26 1 32 

July 5 28 33 

Aug , 4 23 27 

Sept 7 8 15 

Oct 21 26 1 48 

Nov 7 13 -0 20 

Dec 4 19 23 

92 271 7 370 

GONORRHOEA 

10 specimens showed positive gonoccocei — 42 were 
negative. 

8 specimen of pus, urine, smears from cervix and 
Neisser examinations were also done. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES Y. RODGER, M D. 

Bacteriologist. 



10 ANNUAL REPORT 

REPORT OF ATTENDING PHYSICIAN G. U. 

CLINIC 

Lowell, Mass., Jan. 1st, 1926. 
Board of Health, Lowell, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to submit the following - report of the 
activities of the Lowell Genito-Urinary Clinic for the year 
1925: 



TABLE OF ADMISSIONS AND DISCHARGES 

Sex Syphilis Gonor- No. Venereal Chan- Total 

rhoea Diseases croid Cases 

Cases transferred Male 95 30 125 

from 1924 Female 75 18 93 

Total 170 48 218 

Cases admitted Male 47 81 25 15 7 > 

during 1925 Female 48 25 47 120 

Total 95 106 72 ' 273 

Cases re-admitted Male 15 33 4 52 

in 1925 Female 13 4 7 24 

Total 28 37 11 76 

Cases discharged Male 53 109 18 180 

in 1925 Female 47 24 42 113 

Total 100 133 60 293 

Case's Remaininig Male 104 35 11 150 

under treatment Female 89 23 12 124 

Dec. 31, 1925 

Total 193 58 23 274 

TABLE SHOWING SOURCE OF NEW CASES 

Doctors ' : 78 

Hospitals 52 

Nurses 9 

Court, State Dep't of Correction, Policewomen 17 

Clinic — ■ families of patients and their friends 93 

Posters display in public places 8 

Druggists 4 

Financial 10 

Lowell Social League 2 

Re-admitted 76 

Total cases admitted during the year 1925 349 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



TABLE SHOWING DISPOSAL OF DISCHARGED CASES 

Male Female Total 

Cases discharged to different doctors 6 16 22 

Cases discharged to other clinics and hospitals 25 14 39 

Cases discharged as cured or probably cured ..49 11 60 

Cases lapsing treatment before cured 40 17 57 

Cases lapsing treatment by moving out of town 24 24 

Cases discharged as having no Venereal Diseases 38 36 74 

Cases with lapsed treatment being followed up. . 13 4 17 

195 98 293 

TABLE SHOWING SOCIAL FOLLOW-UP 

Male Female Total 

Follow-up letters sent 347 302 649 

Follow-up by Clinic nurses and Health Inspectors 69 31 100 

TABLE OF TREATMENT AND EXAMINATIONS SYPHILIS 

Arsphenamine Treatment at Clinic Male 447 

Female 381 

Total 828 

Arsphenamine Treatment at Lowell General Hospital 

Neuro-Syphilis Clinic to G. U. Clinic Patient Male 10 

Female 3 

Total 13 

Total Arsphenamine Treatments 841 

Lumbar Punctures and Spinal Treatments at Lowell 
General Hospital Neuro-Syphilis Clinic to G. U. 

Clinic Patients Male 10 

Female 3 

Total 13 

Mercury Treatments Male 837 

Female 629 

Total 1466 

Bismuth Treatments Male 85 

Female 75 

Total 160 

Total Syphilitis Treatments 2480 

Vaginal Examinations of Syphilitis Patients 629 

Total Examinations and Treatments 3109 

GONORRHOEA 

Gonorrhoea Treatments Male 881 

Female 490 

Total 1371 



ANNUAL REPORT 



GONORRHOEA AND SYPHILIS 

Treatments for both Gonorrhoea and Syphilis .... Male 102 

Female 64 

Total 166 

EXAMINATION — NO VENEREAL DISEASE FOUND 

Examinations — No Venereal Disease Found Male 129 

Female 141 

Total 270 

Total Examinations and Treatments at Clinic... 4916 

TABLE OF LABORATORY EXAMINATIONS 

Blood Wassermann Tests for Syphilis Male 421 

Female 254 

Total 675 

Spinal Fluid Wassermann, Colloidal Gold, Albumen 

and Globulin Reactions and Cell Count Male 10 

Female 3 

Total 13 

Dark Field Examinations for Primary Syphilis . . . . Male 18 

Female 8 

Total 26 

Microscopic Examinations for Gonorrhoea Male 251 

Female 406 

Total 657 

Total Laboratory Examinations 1371 

Total Therapeutic Procedures (Examinations and Treatments) 6287 

Examinations of the above tables show an admission 
of 349 cases during the year. Of this number the clinic 
patients themselves referred 26.3% to the Clinic, Doctors 
22.6%, Hospitals 14.9%. Sixty-one patients were discharged 
to private physicians and hospitals, sixty were discharged 
as probably cured, fifty-seven lapsed treatment before being 
cured. Seventy-four patients came to the clinic for examin- 
ation and showed no evidence of Venereal Disease. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 13 

A total of 649 Follow-up letters were sent. One 
hundred personal visits by the clinic nurses and health ins- 
pectors were made on cases lapsing treatment. A total 
number of 6287 examinations and treatments were given 
during the year. 

The clinic is indebted to the work of Miss Titcomb 
and Mr. Milot for the social follow-up work outside of the 
regular clinical hours. Miss Costello of the Lowell Police 
Department has assisted in cases referred by the Probation 
Officers and the Court. 

Mr. Connors of the Board of Health has obtained ex- 
cellent results in returning male cases to treatment where 
efforts of the clinic nurses had failed. 

We are indebted to the Lowell General Hospital foi 
sending us two pupil nurses for the Women's evening clinic. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HAROLD L. LELAND M. D., 
Attending: Phvsician Lowell G. U. Clinic. 



14 ANNUAL REPORT 

REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF MILK 

Lowell, Mass., Jan. 1st, 1926. 
To the Honorable Board of Health. 

Gentlemen: 

I have the honor to present the report of the Milk 
Inspection Department for the year beginning- Jan. 1st, 1925. 

4952 samples of milk were examined. 

3704 samples of milk were examined chemically. 

1248 samples of milk were examined for bacterial 
content. 

2156 Lorenz sediment tests were made. 

1096 wagon temperatures were obtained. 

3109 samples were seized from wagons. 

935 samples were seized from restaurants and stores. 

129 samples were seized from producers, schools and 
country milk plants. 

779 samples were brought in by producers, dealers, 
and consumers. 

Pasteurized milk averaged for the year 12.63% total 
solids ; 3.78% fat ; median bacterial count 88,000 per c. c. 

Raw milk averaged for the year 12.53% total solids; 
3.70% fat; median bacterial count 78,000 per c. c. 

The monthly averages of samples seized from dealers 
follows: 

Total Solids 

Jan 12.69 

Feb 12.59 

Mar 12.47 

Apr 12.49 

May 12.49 

June 12.39 

July 12.31 

Aug 12.40 

Sept 12.61 

Oct 12.88 

Nov 13.01 

Dec 12.78 

Standard 12.00 





Pasteurized 


Raw 


Fat 


Bac. 


Bac. 




per c. c. 


per c. c. 


3.90 


82,000 


78,000 


3.82 


169,000 


70,000 


3.71 


88,000 


41,000 


3.64 


49,000 


57,000 


3.66 


135,000 


115,000 


3.64 


96,000 


49,000 


3.51 


53,000 


78,000 


3.64 


57,000 


69,000 


3.76 


115,000 


106,000 


3.89 


115,000 


82,000 


3.98 


73,000 


90,000 


3.90 


82,000 


90,000 


3.35 


100,000 


500,000 



BOARD OF HEALTH 15 

928 stores were issued licenses to sell milk. 
71 stores were issued oleomargarine licenses. 
73 milk wagon licenses were issued. 
$536.00 were obtained from licenses. 

Inspections of creameries, milk plants, and dairy farms 
were made in New Hampshire, Vermont as well as locally. 

The average daily consumption of fluid milk was 
43,240 quarts. 

63.45% of the milk consumed was pasteurized; 36.55% 
was raw. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MELVIN F. MASTER, B. S. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF DIVISION OF 
SCHOOL HYGIENE 

Lowell, Mass., Jan. 1st. 1926. 
To the Board of Health. 

Dears Sirs : 

We have the honor to submit the report of i ; .?e Sub- 
Division of School Hygiene. 

Our nursing personnel has been increased to ten nurses. 
One nurse has been assigned to the High School full time, 
and as can be seen from her report, is, no doubt, rilling a 
long felt need. 

YEAR REPORT OF PHYSICIANS AND NURSES 
1925 — 1926 

Visits to schools by physicians 2382 

Visits to schools by dentists 4 

Visits to schools by nurses 4854 

New pupils examined by physicians 24515 

Pupils examined by dentists 8023 

Pupils re-examined by physicians 7449 

Pupils inspected by nurses 10872 

Notices of defects sent to parents 15706 

Personal letters written 19 

Home visits (new) 2423 

Homes re-visited 737 

DETAILED REPORT 

Consultation with teachers 16687 

Pupils advised * 33757 

Instructions in homes 2237 

Hygiene talks in schools 7993 

Escorted to dental clinic 1551 

Treated at dental clinic 2464 



BOARD OF HEALTH 17 

Escorted to hospital clinics 311 

Habit 11 

X-Ray 1 

Eye 100 

Surgical 57 

Dental 101 

Medical '. . .! 18 

Tb '. 14 

Attended by private physicians 621 

Attended by private dentists " 493 

Pupils inspected by nurses for pediculosis 20561 

Pupils inspected by nurses for vaccination 5703 

Pupils inspected by nurses for defective teeth 44372 

Pupils inspected by nurses for rash .... 1208 

Pupils inspected by nurses for uncleanliness 2676 

First aid in schools 1634 

Corrected vision (glasses) 108 

Tonsils removed 379 

Temperatures taken . 1056 

Cultures taken 98 

Total number of pupils in open air room 54 

Lessons in Home Hygiene taught at Continuation School 91 

Lessons in Home Hygiene taught at Morey School 14 

Tooth Brush Drills ' 630 

Pupils weighed and measured 5220 

Pupils underweight 230 

Von Pirquet test City Hall 5 

Positive 

Negative 5 

Escorted to sight saving class 3 

Referred to Lowell General Hospital Fracture 1 

DEFECTS FOUND BY PHYSICIANS 

Enlarged tonsils 2340 Colds 5 

Otitis media 17 Hydrocephalus 1 

Cyst 5 Diagnosed Chronic Appendix. 1 

Defective Teeth 8023 Acne 149 

Defective Speech 4 Pulmonary Disease 4 

Impaired Breathing 1 Strabismus 65 

Organic Cardiac 69 Submaxillary gland 1 

Cervical Glands 91 Impetigo 85 

Rickets 1 Impacted cerumen 7 

Eye Strain 17 Defective vision 17 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Impaired hearing 


5 

.... 142 


Asthma 


2 


Functional cardiac 


Furuncle 


25 


Spinal Curviture 


1 
1 


No Vaccination 


1 


Ulcerated teeth 


Pain in side 


1 


Orth. defect 


55 


Nervous 


3 


Eczema 


.... • 6 


Herpes 


1 


Deviated septum 


11 
1 
1 


Sprain 


1 


Cleft Palate 

Muscle contraction 


Alpoecia areata 

Nasal catarrh .... 


1 
16 


Elevated temp 

Bronchitis 


2 
7 


Frontal sinus 

Interstitial keratitis ...... 

Pharyngitis 

Scoliosis 


1 

. . 2 


Laryngitis 


1 


1 


Infections 


128 


1 


Anemic 


135 


Stve 

Corneal Ulcer 


1 


Blepharitis 


34 


6 


Goitre 


42 


Conjunctivitis 

Old gland scar 


18 


Chorea 


11 


2 


Pediculosis 

Ringworm 

Scabies 


300 

5 

19 


Icterus 

Headache 

Albino 


1 

1 

. . 1 


Burns 


2 


Sore throat 

Ophthalmia 

Hordeolum 


3 


Unclean 


7 


1 


Malnutrition 


25 


2 



CHILDREN EXCLUDED DURING YEAR 
CAUSES OF EXCLUSION 



Infections 

Rash — Contagion . . 
Pain in abdomen ... . 

Pain in side 

Desquamation 

Unclean 

Chorea 

Pregnancy 

Eczema 

Sore throat and temp. 

Tonsilitis 

Whooping Cough .... 

Elevated temp 

Chickenpox 

Contacts 

Epileptic attack 

Nausea 

Sprain 



No. vaccination 



9 Measles 14 

53 Contacts 60 

5 Impetigo 182 

2 Swollen glands 10 

8 Arm injury 1 

32 Otitis media 2 

1 Dysmenorrhoea 3 

2 Scabies 31 

3 Pediculosis 344 

80 Ringworm 16 

17 Toothache 6 

2 Dermatitis 6 

41 Coryza 21 

14 Ac Conjunctivitis 3 

6 Blepharitis 7 

2 Headache 57 

20 Vomiting 1 

1 Mumps 5 

87 



BOARD OF HEALTH 19 



COMMUNICABLE DISEASES REPORTED 
RELEASED 

Scarlet fever 73 Measles 207 

Contacts 19 Contacts 58 

Diphtheria IS Scarlet fever 50 

Contacts 6 Contacts 19 

Chickenpox 31 Diphtheria 11 

Measles 556 Contacts 9 

Contacts 110 Chickenpox 37 

Encephalitis 1 Contacts 1 

Whooping Cough 2 Encephalitis 1 

Mumps 1 Mumps 2 

Infantile Paralysis 1 Impetigo 2 

Spinal meningitis ... 2 

Contacts 4 

Contagion found in homes 118 

Contagion found in schools 42 

DENTAL CLINIC REPORT FROM JAN. 2 TO DEC. 31, 1925 

Total patients 2464 

New patients : 2384 

Dismissals 2412 

Total operations 5768 

Total operating hours 775 

Prophylactic treatments 1627 

Fillings (Deciduous teeth) 75 

Fillings (Permanent teeth) 481 

Extractions (Deciduous teeth) 2995 

Extractions (Permanent teeth) 590 

PUPILS WITH WORKING CERTIFICATES EXAMINED BY 
DR. FINNEGAN (826) 

Tonsils and adenoids 150 

Teeth Defective 453 

Teeth need cleaning . 750 

Cho. Heart 2 

Underweight 6 

HIGH SCHOOL REPORT — January 1925 to January 1926 

Number of visits to High School by physicians 74 

Consultation with teachers 200 

Pupils advised 1196 

Physical examination of High School Boys 240 

Number of boys without defects 135 



20 



ANNUAL REPORT 



DEFECTS FOUND (Boys) 



Defective teeth 
Organic Heart . 

Strabismus 

Fractured nose . 
Enlarged tonsils 
Acne 



81 
2 
1 
1 

25 



Eye strain . 
Malnutrition 
Blepharitis 
Underweight 
Old infantile 



Physical examination of girls and officers — High School 587 

Number of girls without defects 311 



Defective teeth . 

Acne 

Functional heart 
Enlarged tonsils 
Anemic 



DEFECTS FOUND (Girls) 

193 Curvature of spine 

57 Goitre 

15 Organic Heart . . . . 

46 Impetigo 

29 Gland scar 



1 
25 
4 
1 
2 



Notices of defects sent to parents 504 

Home visits (New) 109 

Homes revisited 13 

Hygiene talks to pupils 1169 

Hygiene talks in homes 122 

Corrected vision (glasses) 13 

Temperatures taken 485 

Cultures taken 4 



FIRST AID TREATMENT AT HIGH SCHOOL 



Toothache 

Sore Throat . . . 
Colds (Coryza) 
Defective vision 
Elevated temp. . 

Syncope 

Eye strain 

Pediculosis 

Hordeolum 

Earache 

Epileptic attack 
Pain in back . . . 

Scabies 

Swollen face . . . 

Ivy rash 

Iodine burn . . . 



96 Blister on heel 

38 Neuralgia 

95 Felon 

4 Abscess in ear 

8 Eye injury 

34 Cuts and infections 

18 Headache and nausea 

2 Vomiting 

8 Organic hearts 

201 Furuncle 

4 Cervicle glands 

9 Dysmenorrhoea 

3 Defective teeth 

1 Chickenpox 

1 Anemic 

1 Pain in abdomen 



7 

2 

3 

1 

2 

164 

244 

3 

3 

13 

3 

142 

2 

1 

1 

7 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



21 



Pain in side . . . 

Frost bite 

Indigestion 

Hysterics 

Measles 

Hiccoughs 

Dogbite 

Eczema 

Needle in finger 
Alopecia areota 



Dressings 
Laryngitis 
Ringworm 
Sprains . . . 
Burns 



10 
5 
7 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 



Foreign bodies rem. from eyes 147 



113 

5 
3 

33 
14 



Stiff neck 

Impetigo 

Unclean 

Slivers removed 

Fracture 

Epistaxis 

Enuresis 

Herpes 

Nervous 

Goitre 

Pinkeye 

Conjunctivitis . . . 

Rash 

Fallen arch .... 

Acne 

Chills 



1 
4 
1 
8 
1 
13 
2 
4 
4 
1 
5 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 



Number of pupils treated and returned to classrooms 1312 



NUMBER OF HIGH 

Sore throat 

Cold and temp 

Dysmenorrhoea 

Pain in left side 

Pain in abdomen 

Diphtheria in family 

Headache and nausea 

Fall 



SCHOOL PUPILS EXCLUDED (56) 

7 Epileptic attack 

11 Pediculosis 

9 Measles in family 

3 Vomiting 

2 Chickenpox 



1 Pinkeye 
14 Syncope . . 
1 Indigestion 



Appointments made to have tonsils removed 

Appointments made for dental clinic 

Readmitted after contagion 

Advised having eyes examined 

Pupils sent home in machines 

Pupils who went home unassisted after treatment 



Dressings each day for cuts and infections 113 



23 
11 
13 

7 
12 
49 



FIELD DAY ON SOUTH COMMON 
(First Aid Treatment) 

Foreign body removed from eye 1 

Cut hands 4 

Epi taxis 1 

Sprains 1 

Syncope 2 

M. M. DWYER, R. N. 



22 ANNUAL REPORT 

SUMMER CAMP 

Girls — Number registered , 100 

Average gain per girl 1 lb. 6 oz. 

Boys — Number registered 113 

Average gain per boy lib. 4 oz. 

Highest gain 7 lbs. 

Lowest gain 4 oz. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANCIS A. FINNEGAN, M. D., 

Director. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE 
LOWELL ISOLATION HOSPITAL 

Lowell, Mass., Jan 1st, 1926 
To the Board of Health of the City of Lowell. 

Gentlemen : 

I have the honor of submitting to you the fifth annual 
report of the Lowell Isolation Hospital for the year ending 
December 31, 1925. 

On January 1, 1925, there were in the hospital 39 
tuberculosis and 9 contagious patients, a total of 48. There 
have been admitted 42 males and 47 females in the tuber- 
cular wards and 78 patients in the contagious ward. These 
figures show that we have treated 128 tubercular patients 
and 87 contagious cases. On December 31, 1925, there were 
44 patients in the hospital ; 21 males and 21 females in the 
tubercular wards and 2 cases of scarlet fever in the conta- 
gious ward. 

The lowest number of patients on any one day during 
the year was 41 and the highest number of patients was 58. 
The daily average in the tubercular ward was 46.1 and the 
daily average in the contagious ward was 4.1, a daily average 
in both departments 50.2, the highest daily average since the 
hospital was opened. The total number of hospital days 
was 18,325 for the year. 

There were 87 patients discharged from the tubercular 
ward — 69 pulmonary cases, 4 non-tubercular cases, and 14 
cases of tuberculosis other than pulmonary tuberculosis. Of 
the 69 pulmonary cases 8 were discharged as arrested, 14 



24 ANNUAL REPORT 

improved, 1 slightly active, 12 unimproved, and 34 died. The 
14 non-pulmonary cases discharged were classified as follows : 
2 tuberculosis laryngitis cases, 1 improved and 1 died, 1 tuber- 
cular meningitis case died, 2 tubercular hip cases, 1 improved 
and 1 unimproved, 4 tubercular spine cases, 3 improved and 
1 transferred to another hospital for surgical treatment, 2 
suspicious tubercular cases transferred to other hospitals for 
treatment ; 1 mediostinal tumor case improved ; 2 tuber- 
cular peritonitis cases died. 

The contagious ward has been open practically the 
entire year and 78 cases have been admitted during the year ; 
9 cases of diphtheria, 9 of erysipelas, 21 of scarlet fever, 32 
of measles, 1 of chickenpox, 1 of trachoma, 2 of epidemic 
cerebro-spinal meningitis, 1 of cerebro-spinal meningitis and 
measles, 1 of broncho-pneumonia, 1 of whooping-cough and 
measles. Of these, 71 were discharged entirely recovered. 
One scarlet fever died; 1 broncho-pneumonia case died; 1 
erysipelas case died a few hours after admittance ; 1 epidemic 
cerebro-spinal meningitis case died about an hour after enter- 
ing the hospital ; 1 diphtheria case died three hours after 
being admitted to the hospital. Two patients were still in 
the contagious ward January 1, 1926. 

The total expenditures for the year ending December 
31, 1925, were $69,227.95. These expenditures were divided 
as follows: $51,037.74 for the tubercular ward and $18,190.21 
for the contagious ward. 

The per capita cost of the tubercular ward for the year 
1925 was $3.03 per day and the per capita cost of the entire 
hospital was $3.77 per day. 

However, to offset these expenditures it must be re- 
membered that the City Treasurer has received the sum of 
$13 ; 386.57 from various sources for the care of patients at this 
hospital, which sum considerably lowers the actual cost to the 
city and brings down the net per capitn cost tc $3.04 per day. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 25 

This sum of $13,386.57 received by the City Treasurer 
is divided as follows : 

Cash from tubercular patients $ 358.58 

Town of Maynard for tubercular patient.... 49.29 

Received from State for tubercular patients. . 10,524.28 

Received from U.S.Veterans' Bureau for tuberculosis 1,132.50 

Total received for tubercular patients $12,064.65 

Cash from contagious patients 496.45 

Received from State for contagious patients 510.00 
Received from other cities and towns for 

contagious patients 315.47 

Total received for contagious patients 1,321.92 

Total received from all sources $13,386.57 

BELOW IS THE FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR 1925 

Initial appropriation, salaries $31,000.00 

Addition appropriation, salaries 5,833.93 

Amount expended for salaries $36,517.68 

Bal. on hand Jan. 1, 1926 316.25 

$36,833.93 36,833.93 

Initial appropriation, expenses $30,000.00 

Transfer, Outdoor relief 201.44 

Transfer Charity Dept 126.44 

Additional appropriation 2,000.00 

Amount expended for supplies $32,268.66 

Bal. on hand January 1, 1926 59.22 

$32,327.88 $32,327.88 

Extra bill schedule for year 1925 $441.61 

Special appropriation, 1926 revenue $441.61 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

I would like to call attention of the Board again to 
work to be done on the hospital grounds. 

The roads within the hospital grounds proper are in 
poor repair and need a layer of crushed stone. 



26 ANNUAL REPORT 

I also recommend that proper legal steps be taken to 
have West Meadow Road accepted as far as the hospital 
entrance. This can easily be accomplished now, as the road 
has been widened and brought practically to grade. By so 
doing, we shall be relieved of the responsibility of keeping 
it clear of snow in winter and repaired in summer. 

The grounds themselves can be beautified to a greater 
extent by laying out more trees to replace those that have 
died or have been damaged by severe storms. These need 
not necessarily be fruit trees but may be shade or pine trees. 

All these suggestions, if carried out, will certainly help 
to improve and make more attractive the institution and will 
carry out the plans originally made when the hospital was 
built. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FORSTER H. SMITH, 

Superintedent. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 27 



REPORT OF EXAMINING PHYSICIAN FOR 
THE TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC 

Lowell, Mass., Jan. 1st, 1926. 
Board of Health, Lowell, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

I have the honor to submit the following: report of 
the work done in the Tuberculosis Clinic for the year 1925. 

Number of Clinics 109 

Number of patients examined 542 

Number of New Patients 165 

Number of Old Patients 377 

Number of Nurses' Visits 5130 

STATISTICAL REPORT 

1 year to 10 years 38 

10 years to 20 years 63 

20 years to 30 years 25 

30 years to 40 years 27 

40 years to 50 years 12 

NATIONALITIES 

American , 62 

Canadian 20 

English 14 

Greek 16 

Irish 13 

Polish 15 

Portuguese 25 

CLASSIFICATION 

Moderately advanced 15 

Arrested 12 

Hilum 13 

Other Forms of Tuberculosis 5 

Suspicious 8 

Non-Tubercular 1 12 



28 ANNUAL REPORT 

DISPOSITION OF CASES 

No. Reading Sanatorium 7 

Rutland Sanatorium 7 

Lakeville Sanatorium 1 

Westfield Sanatorium 12 

Tewksbury State Infirmary 4 

Private Sanatoria 12 

Lowell Isolation Hospital 89 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN N. DRURY, M. D., 

Examining Physician 

BERTHA E. KIRWIN, R. N. ) 
GRACE M. CARROLL, R. N. [• Nurses 
MARY L. RIORDAN, R. N. ) 



BOARD OF HEALTH 29 

REPORT OF CHILD WELFARE NURSES 

Lowell, Mass., Jan. 1st, 1926. 
Board of Health. 

Gentlemen : 

Following- is a report of work done by Child Welfare 
nurses of the Health Department for the year 1925. 

Ophthalmia cases 11 

Ophthalmia re-visits 146 

Prenatal visits 323 

Prenatal re-visits 196 

Prenatal cases referred to hospitals 21 

Babies visited 2648 

Babies revisited 78^2 

Referred to physicians 341 

Referred to Lowell Guild 146 

Premature births 134 

Referred to Tuberculosis Clinic 18 

Referred to G. U. Clinic 13 

Referred to Charity Department 23 

Referred to hospitals 34 

Trachoma cases " 4 

Suppurative Conjunctivitis cases 3 

Investigations 64 

Cards removed 46 

General care and baths 131 

Constant supervision of 10 boarding houses for infants. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PAULINE PICARD, R. N. 
ALICE I. GORMAN, R. N. 
CATHERINE J. SULLIVAN, R. N. 
MARGUERITE R. HIGGINS, R. N. 
MARIE A. GOUDREAU, R. N. 

Child Welfare Nurses. 



30 ANNUAL REPORT 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF MEATS AND 
PROVISIONS 

Lowell, Mass., Jan. 1st, 1926. 
Board of Health, Lowell, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

The following is a report of the work done by the 
Inspector of Meats and Provisions for the year 1925. 

Number of inspections made of stores 3354 

Number of geese condemned as unfit for food. . 6 
Number of fowl condemned as unf't for food. . . 12 
Number of lbs. beef condemned as unfit for food 50 
Number of lbs. pork condemned as unfit for food 32 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. A. HAMBLET, M. D. V. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



REPORT OF PLUMBING INSPECTORS 

Lowell, Mass., Jan. 1st, 1926. 
To the Board of Health, Lowell, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

The following- is a report of the plumbing work done 
by the plumbing inspectors for the year ending December 
31, 1925. 

# 

Wholjs number of applications 940 

New houses 322 

Old houses . . 618 

Total visits 5061 

Inspections 3983 

Tests 901 

Complaints investigated 177 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES N. MIDWOOD 
WILLIAM I. RYAN 

Plumbing Inspectors. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



REPORT OF FUMIGATOR 



Lowell, Mass., Jan. 1, 1926. 
Board of Health. 

Gentlemen: 

Following is a report of fumigations done by me 
during the year 1925 : 

287 houses 
574 rooms 
175 scarlet fever 
38 diphtheria 
49 tuberculosis 
2 Cerebro-spinal meningitis 
2 cancers 

2 infantile paralysis 
2 encephalitis lethargica 

Respectfully submitted, 

SPENCER BROWN, 

Fumigator. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



NOTICES WERE SENT DURING THE YEAR TO ABATE THE 
FOLLOWING NUISANCES: 

Rubbish in yard 59 

Rubbish in cellars 7 

No water supply 6 

Insufficient water supply 3 

Untrapped sinks 6 

Clogged sink waste pipes 2 

Water in cellar : '.'. . 1 

No water supply to toilets 7 

Manure in yard . 2 

Leaky water supply pipes .......-....: 2 

Leaky sink waste pipes 1 

Clogged drains 8 

Open connections in sink waste pipes 3 

Rabbits removed , . . .... . 1 

Clogged toilets 6 

Hens removed 5 

Clogged catch basins 4 

Dirty hallways 2 

Leaky toilets 7 

Overflowing dry wells 3 

Leaky toilet tanks 1 

Pigs removed 4 

Leaky bathtubs 1 

Filthy tenement . : 1 

Permits were given to remove contents of vaults and dry wells ... 16 



34 ANNUAL REPORT 



CASES OF CONTAGIOUS DISEASES REPORTED 

1925 1924 1923 1922 

Diphtheria 50 113 120 213 

Scarlet Fever 265 135 227 130 

Measles 1954 205 132* 145 

Typhoid Fever 10 14 10 11 

Smallpox 

Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis 6 4 5 5 

Infantile Paralysis 6 1 5 1 

Tuberculosis 151 188 192 214 

Influenza 4 7 57 171 



DEATHS FROM CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 

1925 1924 1923 1922 

Diphtheria 4 10 14 16 

Scarlet Fever 3 1 \ 1 

Measles 13 . 12 2 

Typhoid Fever 2 3 3 

Smallpox 

Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis 4 4 3 3 

Infantile Paralysis 2 1 5 1 

Tuberculosis 90 112 100 102 

Influenza 3 6 1 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



TYPHOID FEVER 

Popula- 
tion 

Total 1925 112,759 

Total 1924 112,759 

Total 1923 112,759 

Total 1922 112,759 

Total 1921 112,759 

Total 1920 112,759 

Total 1919 107,978 

Total 1918 107,978 

Total 1917 107,978 

Total 1916 107,978 

Total 1915 .:.. 106,294 

Total 1914 106,294 

Total 1913 106,294 

Total 1912 106,294 

Total 1911 106,294 

Total 1910 106,294 

Total 1909 96,380 

Total 1908 96,380 

Total 1907 96,380 

Total 1906 96,380 

Total 1905 : 94,889 

Total 1904 104,402 

Total 1903 101,959 

Total 1902 ' 99,574 

Total 1901 94,969 

Total 1900 . 94,969 

Total 1899 90,114 

Total 1898 87,000 

Total 1897 87,000 

Total 1896 -. . . . 95,700 

Total 1895 84,359 

Total 1894 83,026 

Total 1893 81,694 

Total 1892 80,361 

Total 1891 79,029 

Total 1890 77,696 



Cases 


Deaths 


Reported 




10 





14 


2 


10 


3 


11 


3 


27 


6 


27 


3 


31 


4 


21 


2 


37 


7 


'61 


13 


112 


18 


85 


11 


65 


11 


86 


10 


61 


7 


186 


22 


91 


11 


188 


24 


73 


9 


30 


7 


56 


17 


48 


17 


238 


26 


83 


16 


70 


18 


85 


17 


57 


17 


119 


24 


105 


18 


178 


36 


172 


33 


282 


50 


160 


53 


373 


75 


293 


77 


454 


123 



36 ANNUAL REPORT 



VITAL STATISTICS 



1924 


1923 


793 


865 


752 


816 



1925 

Deaths, male 743 

Deaths, female 811 

1554 1545 1681 

Children under 1 year 230 

Children under 2 years 305 

Children under 5 years 345 

Percent total deaths under 5 years 22.2 22.7 27.4 



BIRTHPLACES 



275 


312 


307 


392 


347 


461 



Of Deceased Of Parents 

Lowell 587 277 

Massachusetts "110 199 

Other States 240 439 

Ireland , . . 203 764 

Canada 207 564 

Great Britain 97 235 

Other Countries 102 408 

Unknown 8 222 

1554 3108 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



PLACES OF INTERMENT 



St. Patrick's Cemetery 581 

Edson 206 

Westlawn 136 

Lowell 65 

Polish 23 

Other Cemeteries ■ 4 

Removed from City 198 

St. Joseph's Cemetery 341 

1554 



PLACES OF DEATH 



Ward 1 ,: 94 

Ward 2 105 

Ward 3 159 

Ward 4 87 

Ward 5 65 

Ward 6 201 

Ward 7 132 

Ward 8 131 

Ward 9 116, 

Chelmsford St. Hospital 89 

Lowell Corporation Hospital 103 

Lowell General Hospital 75 

St. John's Hospital 138 

Isolation Hospital 42 

Shaw Hospital 6 

Cheney-Allard Hospital 4 

Ferrin-McDermott Hospital 6 

French Hospital 1 

1554 
THERE WERE 3302 VACCINATIONS DURING 1925. 



38 



ANNUAL REPORT 



DEATH RATE 



Population, census 1890 

estimated 1891 

estimated 1892 

estimated 1893 

estimated 1894 

census 1895 

estimated 1896 

estimated 1897 

estimated 1898 

estimated 1899 

census 1900 

estimated 1901 

estimated 1902 

estimated 1903 

estimated 1904 

census 1905 

census 1906 

census 1907 

census . . v 1908 

census 1909 

census 1910 

census 1911 

census 1912 

census 1913 

census 1914 

census 1915 

census 1916 

census 1917 

census 1918 

census 1919 

census 1920 

census 1921 

census 1922 

census 1923 

census 1924 

census 1925 





Deaths 


Death Rate 
Per 1,000 


77,696 


1,959 


25.21 


79,029 


1,972 


24.95 


80,361 


2,224 


27.67 


81,694 


2,094 


25.62 


83,026 


1,775 


21.28 


84,359 


1,857 


22.01 


85,700 


1,901 


22.18 


87,000 


1,855 


21.33 


87,000 


1,808 


20.78 


90,114 


1,848 


20.50 


94,969 


1,849 


19.47 


94,969 


2,038 


21.45 


99,574 


1,935 


19.43 


101,959 


1,898 


18.61 


104,402 


1,736 


16.61 


94,889 


1,899 


20.02 


96,380 


1,918 


19.90 


96,380 


2,063 


21.40 


96,380 


1,963 


20.36 


96,380 


1,885 


19.55 


106,294 


2,100 


19.76 


106,294 


1,925 


18.11 


106,294 


1,891 


17.79 


106,294 


1,749 


16.45 


106,294 


1,768 


16.63 


106,294 


1,820 


17.12 


107,978 


1,964 


18.19 


107,978 


1,938 


17.95 


107,978 


2,473 


22.90 


107,978 


1,709 


15.82 


112,759 


1,770 


15.69 


112,759 


,1,469 


13.02 


112,759 


1,534 


13.60 


112,759 


1,681 


14.90 


112,759 


1,545 


13.70 


112,759 


1,554 


13.78 



MORTALITY REPORT 



FOR THE 



CITY OF LOWELL 



FOR THE 



YEAR 1925 



Deaths During the Year — 1554 (exclusive of Still-Births) 
Stillbirths — 116. 



SEX 

Males — 743 Females — 811 



Population Estimated at 112,759 



Death Rate per 1,000 — 13.78 



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VIII. The Puerperal State 

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X. Diseases of the Bones and of the j 
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191. Execution of civilians by belligerent 


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TABLE 

Cases and deaths of diseases dangerous to the public health; 1925 

This table includes ALL cases (with their deaths) irrespective of 
whether cases were transported into the city from elsewhere or were 
contracted outside of the city. 



CAUSES OF DEATH 


1$ 


H 




1 *= 


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2500 

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114 

1 10 " 
1 1 

1 ° 


1 
62 


1 
75 


59 


69 


128 


237 


1 

144: 


48 1 


79 


305 


811 


483 




Deaths 


9 


10 


12 


7 


6 


9 


15 


9 I 


11 


10 


9 


7 


1. Typhoid Fever 


cases 


1 ° 








• 2 








l 


2i 


1 


1 


' 2 


1 




deaths 


1 ° 


o 

















Oj 








.0 





6. Smallpox 


cases 


! °' 


1 ° 




















Oj 





o 










deaths 


i i 
1 °, 





1 
















1 



01 








.0 





7. Measles 


cases 


i 

[1954 


11 


11 


15 


40 


92 


211 


i 
104 


28 1 


44 


249 


745 


404 




deaths 


r, 

1 265 

1 1 
1 3 
1 1 
1 48 l 


1 ° 











1 


4 


1 


1 


2 





2 


2 


8. Scarlet Fever 


cases 


| 26 


1 

38 


19 


15 


12 


3 


3 


1 


11 


32 


51 


54 




deaths 


1 ° 


1 
2 














1 




1 
°l 


1 











9. Whooping Cough 


cases 

1 
deaths 


! 3 


2 1 





1 


5 


4 1 


11 


1 
2 I 


2 


6 


1 


11 




1 
1 ° 

















° 





1 









.0 





10. Diphtheria 


cases 


1 1 
SO 


12 


1 
4 


5 


1 


5 


2 


1 

2 


1 
1 


8 


5 


2 


2 




deaths 


4 


1 








01 





1 

0! 


1 

01 





3 


o 








22. Acute Anterior 


cases 


6 





1 


1 








l 


1| 


1 

c i 





1 





.1 


Poliomyelitis 


deaths 


1 
2) 





1 

oj 


1 




1 

01 


1 
0| 


oj 


1 
11 


1 

°l 


01 


1 
1 








23. Lethargic 


cases 


2 I 

1 

2| 


I 
1 


1 

01 











i 



1 
1| 


1 

°i 





o 





.0 


Encephalitis 


1 
deaths 1 


1 
11 


1 

0| 


1 




1 

01 


1 



1 

0| 


1 
1 





1 

°l 


1 




1 







31. Tuberculosis, respi 


cases 


|117| 


5 


1 
141 


10 


9 


11 


1 
11 


1 
131 


1 

7\ 


13 


10 


9 


5 


rato'ry system 


deaths 1 


1 1 
711 


61 


71 


10J 


4 


3 


2! 


101 


1 
4 


4 


9] 


7 


5 


32. Tuberculosis of 


cases! 


S l 
1 
71 


o 


01 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1| 

















Meninges, Etc. 


deaths 


1 



1 
0| 


1 1 
1 


1 

31 


1 
1 


1 

11 


1 
0] 


i 
1| 














33-37. Other forms of 


J 
cases | 


29 1 


4| 


4 


4 I 





0| 


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51 


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5 I 





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1 


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Tuberculosis 


1 
deaths | 

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1 
12 


1 

1 


1 
1] 


1 


01 


1! 

I 


1 

2| 


1 
2| 


1 
3 


11 


0| 








40. Ophthalmia Neo- 


1 
cases 1 


14 





1 
1 


4 





2 


1 
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1 
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1| 











1 


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1 
deaths 1 


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CAUSES OF DEATH 


CO 

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0) 

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36. Tuberculosis of other organs 

Ca) Tb. of skin and subcuta- 


"c5 
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(c) Tb. of the lymphatic sys- 1 
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ca 

t. .s 

■ p 

bo 

cu 
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13 


(e) Tb. of organs other than 
the above 

37. Disseminated Tuberculosis 


CU • 

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8: 


CAUSES OF DEATH 


'£ 

c 

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a 

p 

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c 

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111. Ulcer of the stomach and duo- 1 
denum 


(b) Ulcer of the duodeum .... 
112. Other diseases of the stomach 


s 

V 

"2"- 

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c 

ca^ 

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BOARD OF HEALTH 



SWILL ACCOUNT 



Loads 
Collected 

January 682 

February 526^ 

March 565 

April 564 

May 551 

June 569 

July 572^ 

August 740y 2 

September 817^ 

October 641*4 

November 558^ 

December '. 621*4 



Cash 


Charged to 
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Hospital 


$329.00 


24 


252.25 


22 


271.00 


23 


269.50 


25 


262.50 


26 


271.50 


26 


274.25 


24 


357.25 


26 


394.75 


28 


304.25 


33 


265.25 


28 


293.75 


34 



7409*% $3545.25 319 

There were 68 swill licenses granted during the year 



ANNUAL REPORT 



SALARIES OF HEALTH OFFICE — 1925 

Agent $2,665.03 

General Inspector — Mr. Connors 2,232.77 

Plumbing Inspector — Mr. Midwood 1,904.08 

Plumbing Inspector — Mr. Ryan 1,773.66 

Health Inspector — Mr. Kearney 1,484.66 

Meat Inspector — Dr. Hamblet 1,204.00 

Fumigator — Mr. Brown 1,650.02 

Tb. Physician — Dr. Drury 400.12 

Vaccinating Physician — Dr. Johnson 400.11 

Registrar — Miss Snow 1,502.40 

Clerk — Miss White 130.00 

Tuberculosis Nurse — Mrs. Kirwin 1,304.16 

Tb. Nurse — ' Miss Carroll 1,304.16 

Child Welafre Nurse — Miss Goudreau 1,304.16 

Child Welfare Nurse — Miss Gorman 1,304.16 

Child Welfare Nurse — Mrs. Higgins 1,304.16 

Child Welfare Nurse — Miss Picard 754.16 

Child Welfare Nurse — Miss Sullivan . . . 1,304.16 

G. U. Clinic Nurse — Miss Titcomb .' 1,304.16 

G. U. Clinic Nurse — Mr. Milot 365.16 

G. U. Clinic Physician — Dr. Leland 1,000.55 

Salary of Bacteriologist — Dr. Rodger 1,000.00 

Salary of 3 Members of the Board of Health .... 2,100.00 

Total $29,695.84 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



HEALTH OFFICE SUNDRIES 
(Office Supplies) 

Advertising $ 3 60 

Auto Expenses 269.06 

Bact. Laboratory 222.33 

Books 82.35 

Car Tickets . . _ 480.00 

Express 21.87 

First Aid Supplies 57.84 

Fumigating Supplies 181.90 

Investigating Deaths 99.00 

Nurses' Supplies 4.45 

Printing 238.93 

Stamped Envelopes 125.00 

Sundries (Pens, pencils, ribbons, etc.) 166.23 

Telephone 56.99 

Transportation 7.44 

Vaccinating 42.00 

Sub. to paper 6.00 

Elec. Watt Lamps 2.16 

Rep'g chair 5.50 

Morbidity reports U. S. Gov't 125.50 

Directory 5.00 

Rep'g Typewriter 1.00 

$2,204.15 

SUPPLEMENTARY EXPENSES 

(Office Expenses and Supplies — Unpaid 1925 Bills) 

Express $ 45 

Sundries 1.50 

Telephone 4.00 

Printing Annual Report for 1924 321.20 

327.15 

Actual Cost $2,531.30 



78 ANNUAL REPORT 



TUBERCULOSIS EXPENSES 

Lowell General Hospital $ 3.00 

Burials 163.00 

Medical Services 27.00 

Medicine 36.20 

Nurses Cards 15.1b 

Probate Court 40 

Provisions 252.91 

St. John's Hospital 155.50 

Transportation 5.17 

Old Tuberculin 5.00 

Von Pirquet Scarifiers 2.40 

Canton Hospital 600.00 

Lakeville State Sanatorium 740.60 

North Reading San 1,246.60 

Rutland Sanatorium 4.246.62 

Tewksbury State Infirmary 478.00 

Westfield State San 1,812.9.3 

New Bedford, city of 117.86 

Children's Hospital, Boston 210.25 

Chelmsford Board of Health 15.21 

Total Tb. Expenses $10,133.81 



SUPPLEMENTARY TUBERCULOSIS EXPENSES 

(Unpaid 1925 Bills) 

Lakeville State San $ 71.30 

Provisions 11.00 

Tewksbury Infirmary 166.00 

Lowell General Hospital 19.00 

Lowell Hospital 4.50 

271. 



Actual Tb. Expenses $10,405.61 



BOARD OF HEALTH 79 



OFFICE SUNDRIES — Continued 
OTHER CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 

Antirabic Serum '. $ 25.00 

Antirabic Medical Services 52.50 

Medicine 25.30 

Medical Services 711.50 

St. John's Hospital _ 69.00 

Telephone Smallpox Hospital 5.25 

Tetanus Antitoxin '. . . 30.3? 

Swab Wires 17.65 

Provisions 21.95 

Electric Light Smallpox Hospital .99 

-Boston, City of 223.84 

Cambridge, City of 108.00 

Chelmsford Board of Health 67.00 

Holyoke, City of 57.00 

Mass. Eye and Ear Infirmary 293.00 



SUPPLEMENTARY EXPENSES 
(Unpaid 1925 Bills) 

Medical Services • $ 3.00 

Lowell Hospital -. 18.00 



$1708.30 



21.00 

Actual Cost Other Contagious Diseases 1729.30 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OFFICE SUNDRIES — Continued. 
G. U. Clinic Expenses — 1925 

Butyn $ 38.8? 

Medical Services 38.38 

Bulbs 60 

Graduates 2.69 

Mercurochrome Tablets . 135.00 

Mercury Salicylate Cream 36.00 

Lubrisol 6.00 

Laundry 171.2Q 

Printing 15.00 

Potassium Pomanganate 7.50 

Stamps 78 00 

Medicine ■ 43.75 

Gloves 6.06 

Stamps, ink, record book, etc 4.19 

Lowell General Hospital 99.50 

Acraflavine 1.50 

Sodium Ampules 2.00 

Mercurochrome suppositories 75.75 

Aseptic Syringes " 8.40 

Ethyl Chloride 1.00 

Stethescope .... 7.00 

ZO Plasters 2.25 

Thymol Iodide ' 1.75 

Pappenheim Stain 6.42 

Luer Syringes : 73.50 

B. D. Needles 14.00 

Finger cots, basin, tubing . . .'. 2.36 

Gauze 24.03 

Wax Lined Container 10.00 

Micro slides 8.22 

Hypo Syringes 7.50 

Asepto Syringes 16.80 

Green Soap •. 6.30 

Wooden applicators, absorbent cotton 2.95 

Acetic acid, collodion, ether 4.05 

Total G. U. Clinic expenses 958.56 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



TOTAL OFFICE EXPENSES 

Office Supplies $ 2,204.15 

Tuberculosis 10,133.81 

Other Contagious Diseases 1,708.30 

G. U. Clinic 958.56 

$15,004.82 

Supplementary Office Expenses — Unpaid 1925 Bills 619.95 

Actual Office Expenses for 1925 $15,624.77 



YARD LABOR 

Teamsters $20,329.40 

Helpers 15,570.10 

Stablemen 5,621.20 

Foreman 1,977.95 

Blacksmiths 1,854.16 

Cooper 1,398.80 

Yardman 1,898 00 

Wheelwrights 2,818.58 

Gen. Utility 1,562.60 

Vacations 2,012.06 



$55,042.85 



82 ANNUAL REPORT 



HEALTH YARD SUNDRIES 

Buttertubs $ 10.50 

Bran 60.31 

Blacksmiths' Coal .... 160.47 

Blacksmiths' Supplies 377 25 

Coal 516.3? 

Directory 5.00 

Electric Light 54 15 

Gas ' 144.98 

Hay 1,937.52 

Harness Rep'g and Supplies 151.75 

Hardware 122.94 

Hose 8.00 

Stable Blankets 40.00 

Lumber 313.51 

Oats 1,295.50 

Printing 7.00 

Repairing Carriages 34.05 

Straw 58.22 

Salt 10.50 

Shovels 22.50 

Telephone , 13.90 

Cement 29 45 

Sundries, oil, tarpaper soap 37.11 

Veterinary Services 22.50 

Water 85.59 

Animal Regulator 17.20 

Watt. Electric Lamps 4.86 

Removing Dead Horses 6.00 

Brooms 10.00 

Laundry '..' 168.00 



$5,725.08 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



MILK DEPARTMENT SALARIES 



Milk Inspector • $2,310.00 

Collector— Mr. McKeon 1,825.83 

Technician — Mr. Descheneaux 1.565.00 



MILK DEPARTMENT SUNDRIES 

Auto Expenses $336.66 

Bottles 137.05 

Car Tickets 14.00 

Corks 40.50 

Denatured Alcohol 8.00 

Directory 5.00 

Express 9.08 

Labels and Wax 19.00 

Oil of Vitriol 9.56 

Printing 117.60 

Sub. to paper 7.25 

Sundries 17.62 

Telephone 73.4 A 

Testing Babcock 7.50 

Traveling Expenses 125.38 

Envelopes 5.00 

Electric Torch 1.50 

Towels 15.30 

Bags 12.50 

Agar and Blood Serum 5.66 

Registered Letters 14.04 

Dr. Vogel's Urinometer 7.50 

Book 5.00 

Pipettes 39.83 

Absorbent Cotton 4.50 

Binoculars, eyepieces, etc 56.46 



$5,700.83 



$1,094.89 



ANNUAL REPORT 



DIVISION SCHOOL HYGIENE— SALARIES 

Director $ 4,000 00 

11 Physicians 5,500.00 

10 Nurses 10,875.00 

Dr Kent— Dentist 66.00 

Dr. Mullane— Dentist 1,000.00 

Dr Donahoe— Dentist 917.40 

Miss Lantagne — clerk 600.00 

Day Watchman — camp 80.00 

Night Watchman— camp 202.80 

Miss Dwyer — nurse at camp 90.00 

Miss O'Dwyer — nurse at camp 90.00 

Cook at Camp . 60.00 



DIVISION SCHOOL HYGIENE— SUNDRIES 

Auto Expenses $519.05 

Car Tickets 360.00 

Dental Clinic — telephone 52.43 

Dental Clinic — laundry - 141.07 

Dental Clinic — supplies -. 818.81 

Freight 50 

Nurses' Supplies 105.10 

Printing 52.00 

Sealing Scales 3.4y 

Tongue Depressors 51.17 

Traveling Expenses '•■••> 15.00 

Weight Tags 3.83 



$23,481.20 



BOARD OF HEALTH 85 



HEALTH CAMP 

Provisions $279.08 

Combs, soap, flypaper 6.25 

Casks 2.50 

Alaking cots and material 24.58 

Car Tickets 120.00 

Laundry 77.70 

Screening ." 2.60 

Cups, spoons, etc , 25.89 

Ice -14.02 

Napkins 1.00 

Milk and Icecream 298.01 

Gas 22.66 



$874.29 
$2,996.74 



ANNUAL REPORT 



ISOLATION HOSPITAL — SALARIES 

Superintendent $ 1,800.00 

Medical Staff 1,500.00 

Superintendent of Nurses 1,199.29 

Clerk 1,106.67 

Engineer and Fireman 6,537.00 

Laundry 2,397.09 

Chef 1,624 29 

Baker 1,244.6^ 

Nurses 10,854.12 

Waitresses and Ward Maids 1,764.26 

Kitchenwomen and Domestics .* 2,026.00 

Orderlies and Attendant 2,031.44 

Gardener 1,150.00 

Meat Cutter 1,267.27 

Laborer 15.60 



ISOLATION HOSPITAL— SUNDRIES 

Groceries and Provisions $17,271.58 

Medicines and Hospital Supplies , 3,849.86 

Fuel 5,125.39 

Gas 972.38 

Ice 24.15 

Water 936.05 

Electricity 1,227.36 

Office Supplies 300.65 

Boiler House Supplies 150 84 

Miscellaneous House Supplies 1,808.82 

Laundry Supplies 432.15 

Express and Cartage 169.43 



$36,517.68 



$32,268.66 



BOARD OF HEALTH 87 



INCOME TRANSFERRED TO GENERAL FUND — 1925 

CASH 

Swill Sold ' $3,545.25 

Swill . . Licenses 375.00 

Denatured Alcohol Licenses 113.00 

Non-Alcohol beverage Licenses . 80.00 

G. U. Clinic fees 384.85 

Com. of Mass. for G. U. Clinic Subsidy 1,000.00 

Manicure Licenses 8.00 

Day Nursery License : 1.00 

Purchasing Agent for sale of manure 120.00 

Cash received from Alfred Rheault for treatment of 

dogbite 25.00 

Cash received from Isolation Hospital Patients for 
Tuberculosis 

Paul Gallagher 15.00 

Inez Donegan 225.00 

Flora Wright 50.00 

Isabel Brown .' 30.00 

For Other Contagious Diseases 

Helen Robinson 50.00 

Dennis Healey 10.72 

Mary Blakie 15.00 

Cash received from Com. of Mass. through error . . 175.41 

Total Cash received $6,223.23 



88 ANNUAL REPORT 

COMMITTED BILLS 

Com. of Mass. for other contagious diseases not at 

Isolation Hospital $ 49.75 

Com. of Mass. for Tuberculosis burial 40.00 

Robert Martin for sale of manure 84.00 

Overdraft 4.0 ) 

Fitchburg Board of Health for other contagious 

diseases 20.60 

Payments from Committed Bills — Patients at 
Isolation Hospital for Tuberculosis 

Town of Maynard 49.29 

U. S. Veterans' Bureau 1,132.50 

Morris Stolloff 6.43 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 2,593.50 

James Farley ' 32.15 

For Other Contagious Diseases 

Chelmsford, Town of $ 62.1 '5 

Mary Leahey Estate 87.87 

West ford, Town of 3.57 

Rev. William Walsh of Billerica 121.43 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 510.00 

K. Liand 15.00 

E. McGovern 15.00 

Etta Thompson i 17.14 

Salem, City of 116.87 

Tohn Wixstead 32.15 

F. W. Whitely 30.00 

Haverhill, City of : . 4 90.02 

C. O'Brien 23.57 

Carlisle, Town of 42.86 

W. Cahill 78.57 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS for Subsidy for 
Tuberculosis Patients at Isolation Hospital... 7,930.78 

Total Committed Bills $13,189.20 

Total Amount turned over by Health Depart- 
ment to General Treasury $19,412.43 

Milk Department turned over to General 

Treasury 536.00 






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ANNUAL REPORT 

OF 

CHIEF ENGINEER 

OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 
LOWELL, MASS. 




FOR THE YEAR 
NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY - FIVE 



BUCKLAND PRINTING COMPANY 
67 Middle Street, Lowell 



REPORT 



Chief's Office, Central Fire Station, 

Lowell, Mass., January 1, 1926. 

To the Mayor and City Council of the City of Lowell: 

Gentlemen : 

In compliance with the City ordinance, I have the honor 
of submitting for your consideration the annual report of the 
condition and operation of the Fire Department for the year 
ending December 31, 1925- 

The following statement will show the receipts and 
expenditures for the year : 

SALARIES AND WAGES 

Appropriation $400,000.00 

Transferred from expenses and supplies 5,700.00 

$405,700.00 

Expended 405,386.04 

Balance $ 313.96 

EXPENSES AND SUPPLIES 

Receipts 

Appropriation $ 40,000.00 

Transferred from Street Department . . 125.00 

40,125.00 
Transferred to salaries and wages .... 5,700.00 

$ 34,425.00 

3 



Expenditures 

Automobile repairs and upkeep $ 10,763.75 

Bedding 736.80 

Chemicals 136.71 

Coal and wood 7,042.21 

Fire Alarm upkeep 1,151.04 

Freight and express 48.51 

Hose 5,225.00 

Laundry 831.14 

Lighting 3,066.94 

Office supplies and printing 766-33 

Repairs 757.76 

Sundries 1,794.83 

Telephone 355.72 

Water bills 982.53 

33,659.27 

Balance $ 765,73 



FIRE EQUIPMENT LOAN 

Balance from 1924 $51,699.61 

Expended 49,835.54 



Balance $ 1,864.07 



SALARIES OF MEMBERS OF THE FIRE 
DEPARTMENT 

Chief Engineer $3,500.00 per annum 

1st Deputy Chief 2,500.00 per annum 

2nd Deputy Chief 2,300.00 per annum 

3rd Deputy Chief 2,300.00 per annum 

4th Deputy Chief 2,300.00 per annum 

Captains of Companies 5.58 per day 



Lieutenants of Companies 5.30 per day 

Privates, 1st grade 5.00 per day 

Privates, 2nd grade 4.50 per day 

Privates, 3rd grade 4.00 per day 

Electrician 47.75 per week 

Linemen 37.50 per week 



FORCE 

The force is entirely permanent and consists of 
1 Chief Engineer 4 Linemen 

4 Deputy Chiefs 3 Telephone Operators 

1 Drill Master 2 Chauffeurs 

1. Clerk 137 Hosemen 

1 Fire Alarm Operator 44 Laddermen 

20 Patrolmen 

A total of 218, of which 21 are Captains and 19 Lieu- 
tenants- 

They are divided into companies as follows : 

10 Motor Engine Companies. 

4 Motor Hose Companies. 

4 Hook and Ladder Companies. 

1 Protective Company. 



CHANGES DURING THE YEAR 

Appointed, permanent 19 

Died, permanent 2 

Discharged 1 

Pensioned 4 

Promoted " 3 



APPARATUS 

The apparatus of this department is kept in the best 
possible condition and consists at present of: 

Chief's Automobile 1 

Deputy Chiefs' Automobiles 2 

Electrician's Automobile 1 

Combination Motors, Chemical and Hose 

Wagons 4 

Triple Combinations 10 

Aerial Ladder Truck 1 

Auto Patrol Wagon . 1 

City Service Trucks 3 

Service Car 1 

Fire Extinguishers 37 



RESERVE APPARATUS 

Deputy Chief's Automobile 1 

Aerial Ladder Truck 1 

Hale Water Tower 1 

Steam Fire Engines 5 



TELEPHONE 

The telephone system is the same that was installed in 
1913, consisting of one thirty-line switchboard located at the 
Palmer Street Station, which is connected with the Central 
office of the New England Telephone and Telegraph Company 
by two toll lines, and also the fourteen different lire stations, 
the Chief's office and residence, three Deputy Chiefs' resi- 
dences and battery room with eleven local lines. 



PROTECTIVE DEPARTMENT 

This department is maintained by the City and consists 
of twenty permanent men. They have responded to two hun- 
dred and eighty-four alarms ; in service one hundred fifty-five 
and three-quarters hours ; spread two hundred and fifty-one 
covers ; used thirty-one extinguishers and thirty-five tanks ; 
raised six hundred and sixty-five feet of ladders. 

FIRE PREVENTION 

A systematic inspection of buildings is made by the 
members of the Fire Department in order to relieve the fire 
hazard of the city. Each company has a certain district 
to inspect, and each inspection is recorded on a printed slip 
with report of conditions found. These slips are turned over 
to the Chief of the Department, and, when the conditions 
found are considered dangerous, letters are sent to both 
owners and tenants to have said conditions remedied, 8,817 
buildings were inspected during the year by the different 
companies. 

FIRES AND LOSSES 

The whole number of alarms during the year ending 
December 31, 1925, was one thousand two hundred forty- 
seven (1,247). Two hundred and seventy-five (275) were 
given from signal boxes ; five hundred and forty-six (546) 
telephones; one hundred and ninety-three (193) stills; seven 
(7) automatics ; twenty-eight (28) exposures ; and one 
hundred and ninety-eight (198) reported fires. The "No 
School' signal was given eleven (11) times. There were three 
hundred and seventy-five (375) fires extinguished by chemi- 
cals alone and two hundred and fifty-eight (258) where water 
was used. The remaining number were extinguished by other 
means or had been put out before the arrival of the depart- 
ment. One hundred and two (102) were in brick, stone or 
cement buidings ; four hundred and twenty-four (424) in 
frame buildings and five hundred and twenty-three (523) 



other than building fires. The reported fires were mostly in 
frame buildings. 

The whole amount of loss, except the reported fires 
was three hundred thirty-six thousand, nine hundred forty- 
four dollars and ninety cents ($336,944.90) ; insurance, four 
million, three hundred seventy thousand, seven hundred 
ninety dollars and seventy-six cents ($4,370,790.76) ; insurance 
paid, three hundred fifteen thousand, five hundred thirty-six 
dollars and fifty cents ($315,536.50) ; loss above insurance, 
twenty-one thousand, four hundred eight dollars and forty 
cents ($2 1,408. 40) ; valuation, three million, five hundred 
thirty-two thousand, seven hundred and fifty dollars 
($3,532,750-00). The reported loss was ten thousand, seven 
hundred forty-six dollars and fifty-eight cents ($10,746.58) ; 
insurance, nine million, six hundred seventy-six thousand, 
fifty-three dollars and fifty-one cents ($9,676,053.51) ; valua- 
tion, nine million, five hundred sixty-two thousand, forty 
dollars ($9,562,040.00). 

There have been seven (7) alarms out of the city, to 
which some part of the department has responded, for which 
no insurances are kept; Chelmsford, 1, Dracut, 2, East Chelms- 
ford, 1, North Chelmsford, 1, Tyngsboro, 2. 

There have been fifty-five (55) fires where the loss was 
one thousand dollars and over. 

January 10th, 55 Franklin Street, owned by Anastasia 
Riches and occupied by C. Malicourtis, loss $1,378.00. 

January 10th, 368-74 Merrimack Street, owned by L. 
H. Beaulieu and L. B. Desrosiers and occupied by several, loss 
$3,779.30. 

January 11th, 29 C Street, owned and occupied by J. 
Tierney, loss $2,239.50. 

January 15th, 134 Market Street, owned by Burton H. 
Wiggin and occupied by Burton H. Wiggin and Edward J 
Brennan, loss $10,754.52. 



January 23rd, Pawtucket and Moody Streets, owned 
and occupied by A. J. Cummiskey Motor Car Company, loss 
$1,354.00. 

January 24th, 256 Appleton Street, owned and occupied 
by Julia E. Ross, loss $4,958.35. 

January 25th, 290 West Sixth Street, owned and 
occupied by A. Hamelin, loss $1,008.00. 

January 29th, 245 Market Street, owned by Margaret 
W. Merrill and occupied by Laganas Shoe Company and 
others, loss $6,219.37. 

January 29th, Western Avenue, owned by G. L. Cady 
and occupied by G. L. Cady and Sons and others, loss $38,127- 

February 22nd, 15 Varney Street, owned by Simon 
Cassis and occupied by Alban Leboeuf, loss $1,178.17. 

February 23rd, 82 Bridge Street, owned by Katze Bros, 
and occupied by A. Malicourtis and Mary Dupuis, loss $2,504. 

March 21st, 452 Broadway Street, owned by C. H. 
McEvoy and occupied by Ryan Grain Company, loss $3,521.00. 

April 1st, 1358 Varnum Avenue, owned and occupied by 
Peter Hankinson, loss $4,000.00. 

April 6th, 79-89 Railroad Street, owned and occupied by 
Nathan Goldman, loss $6,142.00. 

April 7th, 452 Broadway Street, owned by C. H. Mc- 
Evoy and occupied by Ryan Grain Company, loss $21,932.52. 

April 7th, 266 Mt. Vernon Street, owned and occupied 
by Otis Allen & Son, loss $4,246-00. 

April 7th, 425-7 Broadway Street, owned by M. & M. 
Molinsky and occupied by several, loss $3,032.50. 

April 11th, 451 Westford Street, owned by Peter 
Belocas and occupied by Adelard Coutu, loss $2,249.25. 

April 19th, 9 Manufacturers Street, owned by S. Ka- 
linsky and occupied by several, loss $1,655.69. 

April 21st, 128-48 Central Street, owned by J. T. 
Stevens Estate and occupied by G. A. Dickey, loss $1,436.80. 

April 23rd, rear 82 West Third Street, owned by N. 
Hayeck and occupied by several, loss $2,283.00. 



April 23rd, 376 Merrimack Street, owned by L. H. 
Beaulieu et al and occupied by several, loss $3,248-70. 

May 19th, 62 Suffolk Street, owned and occupied by S. 
Husson, loss $3,767.00. 

May 27th, 61-77 Railroad Street, owned by I. Steinberg 
and occupied by several, loss $3,378.25. 

May 28th, 56 Auburn Street, owned by C. & L. Trombly, 
vacant, loss $2,050.30. 

June 13th, 509 Beacon Street, owned and occupied by 
O. D. Jasmin, loss $2,258.00. 

June 30th, 476 Bridge Street, owned and occupied by 
H. F. Sullivan, loss $3,852.00. 

July 4th, 45 Marion Street, owned and occupied by A. 
Gagaly, loss $1,478.00- 

July 9th, rear 981 Bridge Street, owned by D. Gage 
Est. and occupied by M. Miller, loss $1,650.00. 

July 20th, Foundry Street, owned and occupied by J. P. 
Robinson Company, loss $1,641.84. 

July 23rd, 316 Merrimack Street, owned by George E. 
Mongeau and occupied by Gaumont Bros, and others, loss 
$3,997.36. 

July 28th, 20 Arch Street, owned by Mrs. Stevens and 
occupied by R. L. Gleason, loss $1,888.00- 

August 6th, 51 Cushing Street, owned by E. J. Noyes 
Estate and occupied by C. H. Hanson Company, loss $11,230.60. 

August 10th, 58 Wannalancit Street, owned and occu- 
pied by M. Malouf, loss $3,500.00. 

August 17th, New York Street, owned and occupied by 
Bofel Rug Company, loss $1,925.00. 

August 23rd, rear 18 Daly Street, owned by G. Green- 
berg, vacant, loss $2,000.00. 

August 28th, 118-20 Chelmsford Street, owned by E. 
Wolff and occupied by several, loss $2,500.00. 

September 13th, 220 Tanner Street, owned by Lowell 
Trust Company and occupied by Lowell Braid Company, loss 
$14,896-82. 

September 26th, rear 147 Cheever Street, owned by D. 
Bauvier and occupied by B. Jaques, loss $1,361.50. 

10 



September 28th, 1 Swan Street, owned by H. Cox and 
occupied by H. Hook, loss $1,000.00. 

October 3rd, 20 Light Avenue, owned and occupied by 
S. Crosby, loss $1,409.00. 

October 30th, 100 Mt. Washington Street, owned and 
occupied by Mary A. Boyle, loss $1,586.00. 

November 5th, 586-90 Merrimack Street, owned by 
George C Fairburn and occupied by several, loss $9,476.72. 

November 7th, 94 Gorham Street, owned by F. O. of E- 
and occupied by F. O. of E., and others, loss $29,873.99. 

November 7th, 104 Gorham Street, owned and occupied 
by Walter Coulson, loss $2,164.34. 

November 7th, 333-53 Central Street, owned and occu- 
pied by Thomas F. Hennessey, loss $1,500.00. 

November 16th, 338 Market Street, owned by D. A. 
Sakellarios and occupied by Malicourtis Bros., loss $1,901.70. 

November 18th, 462 Wilder Street, owned and occupied 
by J. H. Welton, loss $1,459.00- 

Novmbef 24th, Tanner Street, owned by C. P. Harring- 
ton and occupied by S. Cohen, loss $2,250.00. 

November 24th, Tanner Street, owned by J. A. Simpson 
and occupied by C. Comerford, loss $4,381.00. 

November 25th, 57 Dover Street owned and occupied 
by A. L. Paul, loss $24,148.00. 

December 6th, 31 Marion Street, owned by N. Metro- 
poulos, vacant, loss $1,640.00. 

December 7th, 228 First Street, owned by C Karakas 
and occupied by D. Karapoulos, loss $2,530.60. 

December 10th, 225 Stedman Street, owned and occu- 
pied by E. Veilleux, loss $1,20600. 

December 29th, 190-98 Middlesex Street, owned by 
Heirs of F. Fox and occupied by several, loss $13,239.80. 

The total loss on these fifty-five (55) fires was two 
hundred ninety thousand, three hundred eighty-eight dollars 
and forty-nine cents ($290,388.49) leaving forty-six thousand, 
five hundred fifty-six dollars and forty-one cents ($46,556.41) 
to be divided between the other nine hundred and ninety-four 
(994) alarms. 

11 



A comparison of the Total number of Alarms and 
Losses from January, 1910 to January 1926: 



Year 


Alarms 


Ins. Loss 


Unis. Loss 


Total Loss 


1910 


904 


$ 64,781.93 


$ 3,1S8.00 


$ 67.969.93 


1911 


1101 


86,034.34 


19,295.48 


105,32982 


1912 


959 


260,833.26 


9,575.99 


270,409.25 


1913 


882 


200,600.03 


19,825.26 


220,425.29 


1914 


1028 


265,804.53 


17,476.53 


283.281.06 


1915 


926 


170,262.53 


12.127.67 


182.390.20 


1916 


896 


138,170.66 


3,400.86 


141.571.52 


1917 


1031 


129,207.10 


14,994-73 


144,201.83 


1918 


1047 


161,940.71 


37,688.51 


199,629.22 


1919 


942 


211,681.50 


20,461.42 


232,142.92 


1920 


876 


204,249.92 


96,762.40 


301.012.32 


1921 


1104 


237,619.25 


20,476.30 


258,095.55 


1922 


1306 


448,506.32 


19,299.64 


467,805.96 


1923 


1407 


595,748.14 


46,513-30 


642,261.44 


1924 


1428 


971,315.63 


44,780.25 


1,016,095.88 


1925 


1247 


326,283.08 


21,408.40 


347,691.48 



TOTAL NUMBER OF BUILDINGS IN THE CITY 

Wooden buildings 20,548 

Brick biuldings 1,125 

Cement buildings 624 

Stone buildings 84 

Wood and glass buildings 43 

Steel buildings 32 

Iron buildings 25 

Wood buildings covered with metal. ... 21 

Kellastone buildings 53 

Concrete buildings 8 

Stucco buildings 9 

Metal buildings 4 

Buildings of all descriptions 22,576 

An increase during the past year of .... 429 

12 



NUMBER OF ALARMS OF FIRE EACH MONTH 

January 110 

February 59 

March 76 

April 158 

May 73 

June 79 

July 82 

August 84 

September 65 

October 61 

November 105 

December 97 

Reported 198 

Total 1,247 



CAUSES OF FIRES AND ALARMS 



Acids set chemicals 1 

Alarms for same fire 34 

Ash barrel 3 

Automobiles 59 

Boiler overflowed 2 

Boiler run dry 1 

Boiler set floor 1 

Boiler smoking ■ 1 

Blasting rocks 1 

Block signal on R. R. pole. ... 1 

Boy set fireworks 1 

Brewing 2 

Broken fly wheel 1 

Broken glass on boiler 1 

Broken sprinkler head 1 

Broken water pipe 1 

Brush 26 

Burning grass set house .... 1 

Candle 2 

Candle set curtain 1 

Candle set woodwork 1 

Carelessness 5 

Careless smoking 9 

Careless use of matches .... 14 
Chicken brooder 1 



Children and matches 18 

Chimney 75 

Cigaret 30 

Clothing caught fire 1 

Combustion 53 

Covering on pipes 1 

Defective boiler 1 

Defective chimney 7 

Defective fireplace 1 

Defective flue 1 

Defective funnel 2 

Defective furnace pipe 1 

Defective stove pipe 1 

Defective wires 9 

Defective wires on radio .... 1 
Dipping electric bulbs in solu- 
tion 1 

Dog tipped over lantern — set 

hay 1 

Drying plaster 4 

Dump 199 

Electric cord 1 

Electric iron 2 

Electric wires 9 

Exposure 28 



13 



False alarms 34 

Fat on stove 2 

Firecrackers 9 

Friction on oil can 1 

Fumigating 2 

Gas from furnace 1 

Gas heater 1 

Gas iron 1 

Gas meter exploded 1 

Gas set bed clothes 1 

Gas set woodwork 1 

Gas stove 5 

Gasoline ignited 1 

Gasoline pipe 1 

General 2 

Grass 132 

Grass set building 1 

Grease in oven 2 

Hot ashes IS 

Hot box on shafting 1 

Hot rivets 1 

Hot stove set clothes 1 

Incendiary 1 

Investigated 7 

Leaves in school yard 1 

Leaves in street 5 

Lightning 3 

No school 11 

Oil stove 1 

Oil tank for tempering steel 1 

Oily rags 3 

Out of the City 7 

Overheated boiler 7 

Overheated chimney 1 - 

Overheated fireplace 2 

Overheated funnel 3 

Overheated kerosene stove . . 1 

Overheated motor 1 

Overheated oven 2 

Overheated stove 

Overheated stove pipe 

Pan of bread 

Pan of meat on stove 

Picker machine 

Picker set cotton 

Plumbers' torch 

Popping corn 

Rats nest • 3 



Rats and matches 1 

Rekindled 9 

Reported alarms 198 

Rescue boy on roof 1 

Rescue boy from wires 1 

Roasting corn 1 

Rubbish 23 

Salamandarine J 

Second alarms 7 

Set by boys 15 

Set by tramps 1 

Smoke from chimney 4 

Smoke from fireplace 1 

Smoke from flue 1 

Smoking hams 1 

Smoking set bed t 

Smoking set couch 1 

Sparks from boiler 2 

Sparks from chimney 4 

Sparks from locomotive .... 1 

Sparks from machine 

Sparks from oven 

Sparks from stove 

Sparks in pipe 

Sparks in picker 

Sparks set gasoline 

Sparks set roof 

Steam 

Steam blowing off 

Steam escaping 

Steam pipe 

Still pipe 

Still exploded 

Stove smoking 

Stove set clothes 

Sun set rubbish 

Tar kettle 

Thawing water pipes 

Thermostat system out of order 

Torch set rags 

Transformer 

Tree 

Using torch 

Wagon with lantern 

Water pipe burst 

Wires 

Wire in tree 

Wires on pole 



14 



NUMBER OF ALARMS ANSWERED BY MEMBERS 
OF THE DEPARTMENT ON DAYS OFF 



Dist. Chief R. E. Burns... 3 

Dist. Chief D. H. Crowley . . 4 

Dist Chief T. F. Saunders . . 4 

Dist. Chief J. C. Sullivan . . 3 

Capt. C. E. Abare 2 

Capt. G. S. Alcott 1 

Capt. J. F. Ambrose 6 

Capt. J. E. Burns 1 

Capt. J. M. G. Burns 4 

Capt. G. A. Campbell 2 

Capt. J. L. Crowe 3 

Capt. E. H. Dearth 3 

Capt. W. A. Dolan . . ' 1 

Capt. P. F. Mahoney 5 

Capt. J. J. McCafferty ...... 1 

Capt. G. H. McDermott .... 2 

Capt. J. A. Shea 5 

Capt. C. F. Stackpole 2 

Capt. J. J. Wholey 4 

Lieut. F. E. Alcott 2 

Lieut. R. W. Broadbent 1 

Lieut. G. H. Chapman 2 

Lieut. W. E. Gorman 1 

Lieut. J. A. Haley 2 

Lieut. J. W. Halstead 2 

Lieut. W. S Holt 1 

Lieut. G. J. Hurley 2 

Lieut. E. Jennings 3 

Lieut. J. J. Malone 5 

Lieut. M. F. McNally 3 

Lieut. P. F. Mooney 1 

Lieut. M. J. O'Connor 2 

Lieut. A. F. Prescott 2 

Lieut. E. A. Walsh 3 

Lieut. T. H. Welch 1 

J. C. Alexander 3 

J. F. Armstrong 2 

E. S. Barnes 2 

W. J. Bourdon 4 

F. Broadbent 2 

C. J. Brosnan 2 

M. E. Burgess 1 



T. J. Burke 2 

J. E. Burns 4 

H. Carpentier 2 

W. T. Caveney 1 

G. A. Collins 2 

J. F. Convery 3 

W. J. Corbett 1 

M. P. Correa 3 

T. Corrigan 2 

H. G. Cote 5 

J. A. Couilliard 2 

G. A. Crawford 2 

M. H. Creegan 1 

G. W. Cummings 1 

P. J. Deschene 2 

P. O. Desmarais 1 

W. T. Dolan 3 

J. J. Donohoe 3 

F. J. Donnelly 3 

J. C. Drescher : . . . . 2 

W. F. Egan 2 

J. N. Emerson 2 

F. V. Fahey 1 

E. F. Farrell 1 

G. G. Fezette 3 

J. E. Fontaine 2 

E. A. Gendreau 1 

M. J. Gildea 1 

E. T. Gilfillan...' 2 

T. J. Gillick 2 

C. E. Gillis 2 

J. P. Gillis 2 

W. J. Graham 1 

N. Grandchamp 2 

H. F. Grantz 1 

P. B. Gray 2 

H. V. Green 3 

A. X. Hamel 1 

W. J. Heelon 1 

H. W. Hilliard 2 

J. H. Hogan 4 

J. J. Hurley 1 



15 



J. D. Ismond 1 D. 

P. A. Johnston 2 E. 

F. A. Kappler 1 J. 

J. W. Kearney 1 J. 

F. J. Kelleher 2 P. 

A. E. Kenefick 2 S. 

W. J. Killoy 3 E. 

J. T. Kirane 1 L. 

W. H. Kirkpatrick 1 W 

E. Landry 3 N. 

W. J. Lane 2 T. 

R. LeBlue 2 J. 

J. H. Lemire 2 W 

J. J. Leonard 1 C. 

J. J. Lowney 2 J. 

J. J. McCarthy 2 W 

G. A. McCarthy 1 J. 

T. P. McColough 1 B. 

J. P. McCready 1 M. 

J. E. McGann 1 J. 

A. B. McLaughlin 1 E. 

H. A. McLaughlin 1 F. 

J. J. McManmon 3 T. 

W. E. McNally 1 R. 

W. F. McNiff 2 L. 

T. F. Maguire 3 J. 

R. D. Marshall 3 E. 

J. J. Miskell 1 J. 

M. J. Miskell 1 F. 

P. J. Mooney 2 G. 

J. P. Moore 2 S. 

J. J. Moran 2 H. 

C. J. Morin 3 W 

J. J. Mulligan 2 T. 

F. E. Murphy 2 J. 

J. F. Nelligan 2 



F. O'Connor 4 

J. O'Donnell 4 

O'Hare 2 

C. O'Neil . . .-. 1 

J. O'Rourke 1 

R. Pendexter 3 

Perham 3 

R. Pope 3 

T. Powers 1 

A. Primeau 2 

F. Rafferty 1 

A. Ready 2 

. F. Riley 3 

A. Rock 1 

H. Rogers 1 

. J. Ryan 2 

H. Sexton 1 

M. Simpson 1 

Slattery 1 

M. Spillane 3 

F. Sullivan 2 

J. Sullivan 2 

F. Sullivan 3 

N. Symonds 2 

B. Tansey 1 

F. Thomas 3 

J. Tighe 1 

L. Tully 1 

E. Turner 1 

T. Underwood 2 

Urbanek 2 

T. Welch 2 

White 1 

M. Whitehead 3 

R. Willis 5 



16 



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IN MEMORIAM 



QUINCY A. FOSTER 
Hoseman 

ENGINE COMPANY NO. 
Appointed June, 1889 

DIED 

November 14, 1925 



philip Mclaughlin 

Telephone Operator 

PALMER STREET 
Appointed August, 1888 

DIED 
June 8, 1925 



18 



FATALITIES 

October 28th — Claire Pelletier, 205 Cumberland Road, 
age four years. Playing- with matches. 

November 14th — Mrs. Catherine C. Dougherty, 17 
Nichols Street, age forty-three years. Gas stove set clothing. 

In conclusion I wish to' extend my thanks to His Honor, 
the Mayor, and the City Council for the interest taken in 
matters pertaining to the Fire Department- I also wish to 
thank the officers and members of the Department for the 
ability, faithfulness and willingness shown in the performance 
of their duty. I wish to extend thanks to the Chief of Police 
and the members of the Police Department for the assistance 
rendered at fires. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD F. SAUNDERS, 

Chief of Fire Department. 



19 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

JANUARY 1, 1926 



Chief Engineer 

EDWARD F. SAUNDERS, Office, Palmer St, Engine House 
Residnce, 24 Mt. Washington Street 



Deputy Chiefs 

James C. Sullivan .250 Rogers Street 

Daniel H. Crowley 26 Marginal Street 

Thomas F. Saunders 88 Butterfield Street 

Richard E. Burns 203 Westford Street 

Chief's Chauffeurs 

Frank J. Geary 16 Olive Street 

John W. Gray 231 School Street 

Fire Alarm Operators 

Thomas F. Conway . 128 Pleasant Street 

Thomas McCormick, Lineman 57 Fourth Street 

Arthur E. King, Lineman 205 Stackpole Street 

William C. Martin, Lineman 23 Walker Place 

Frederick H. Britton, Lineman 47 Lundberg Street 

Telephone Operators 

Harry B. Sanders 20 Manahan Street 

Wilbur H. Oke 175 Westford Street 

W. Henry Kirkpatrick 35 London Street 

Drill Master 

John F. Ambrose 212 Princeton Street 

Repair Department 

Harold L. Foster 525 Chelmsford Street 

Herman R. Morrison 17 Holden Street 

Clerk 

Bertha J- Marrow 1039 Middlesex Street 

20 



LIST OF MEMBERS, GIVING RANK AND 
RESIDENCE BY COMPANIES 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 1 
795 Gorham Street 

Thomas W. Collins, Captain, Badge No. 11 50 A St. 

Philip F. Mooney, Lieutenant, Badge No. 10 203 Moore St. 
James O'Hare, Hoseman, Badge No. 13 27 Ellsworth St. 

John P. Moore, Hoseman, Badge No. 19 1017 Central St. 

George W. Mulvey, Hoseman, Badge No. 1 780 Gorham St. 
Jay D. Ismond, Engineer, Badge No- 15 14 Fleming St. 

Manuel P. Correa, Hoseman, Badge No. 14 20 Summer St. 
David Laferriere, Hoseman, Badge No. 12 100 W. Meadow Rd. 
William J. Ryan, Hoseman, Badge No. 16 11 Pihl St. 

Joseph E. McGaun, Hoseman, Badge No. 18, 37 Cosgrove St. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 2 
45 Branch Street 

John J. Wholey, Captain, Badge No. 2 583 Stevens St. 

William E- Gorman, Lieutenant, Badge No. 222 17 Ellis Ave. 
Frank Broadbent, Hoseman, Badge No. 27 119 Branch St. 
George A. Cummings, Hoseman, Badge No. 24 11 Third Ave. 
James T. Kirane, Hoseman, Badge No. 81 32 Crosby St. 
Joseph H. Lemire, Hoseman, Badge No. 23 156 Branch St. 
Harry G. Cote, Hoseman, Badge No. 22 84 Homestead Rd. 
William J. Corbett, Hoseman, Badge No. 21 134 Pleasant St. 
Leo R- Pope, Hoseman, Badg No. 28 37 Fort Hill Ave. 

Joseph A. Couilliard, Hoseman, Badge No. 29 121 Willie St. 
John P. Mealey, Hoseman, Badge No. 25 

104 Mt. Washington St. 



21 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 3 
Palmer Corner Middle Street 

Elbridge H. Dearth, Captain, Badge No. 31 64 So. Loring St. 
Forest E. Alcott, Lieutenant, Badge No. 30 38 Grace St. 

John J. Mulligan, Hoseman, Badge No. 37 400 Concord St. 
Francis P. McGovern, Hoseman, Badge No- 34 

43 Riverside Ave. 
Hugh V. Green, Hoseman, Badge No. 35 19 Bunker Hill St. 
Paul A. Johnston, Hoseman, Badge No. 38, 397 Broadway St. 
Walter T. Powers, Hoseman, Badge No. 33 127 Pine St. 

Ralph A. Dodge, Hoseman, Badge No. 32, 25 Walker Place 
Joseph H. Warren, Hoseman, Badge No. 39 598 Gorham St. 
Cyrille J. Morin, Hoseman, Badge No. 178, 95 Pawtucket St. 
Thomas J. Burke, Hoseman, Badge No- 3 41 C St. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 4 
High Street 

George H. McDermott, Captain, Badge No. 4 221 WhiteSt. 
Alfred E. Prescott, Lieutenant, Badge No. 42, 565 Wilder St. 
William F. Dolan, Hoseman, Badge No. 43 Engine House 

Francis J. Sullivan, Hoseman, Badge No. 44, 256 Concord St. 
Michael F- Egan Hoseman, Badge No. 48, 113 Pleasant St. 
James T. Doyle, Hoseman, Badge No- 49 25 Lawrence St. 
John C. Alexander, Hoseman, Badge No. 45 201 Moore St. 
Milan E. Burgess, Hoseman, Badge No. 40 702 Lawrence St. 
Joseph H. Sexton, Hoseman, Badge No. 41, 3 Fernald St. 
Patrick J. Mooney, Hoseman, Badge No. 46 

207 Mammoth Road 



22 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 5 
29 Fourth Street 

James J. McCafferty, Captain, Badge No. 55 74 Fourth St. 
Philip J. Connor, Lieutenant, Badge No. 53 506 Gorham St. 
Alonzo E. Kidder, Hoseman, Badge No. 5, 61 Twelfth St. 
Edson S. Barnes, Hoseman, Badge No. 50 68 Beacon St. 
Archibald E. Kenefick, Hoseman, Badge No. 58 

967 Middlesex St. 
Frank E. Turner, Hoseman, Badge No. 54 15 Ware St. 

Leo B. Tansey, Hoseman, Badge No. 57 

690 East Merrimack St. 
Warren White, Hoseman, Badge No. 51 12 Lawson St. 

James L. Tully, Hoseman, Badge No. 52 53 Chestnut St. 
William F-Callahan, Hoseman, Badge No. 56, 408 Stevens St. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 6 
Fletcher Street 

Joseph L. Crowe, Captain, Badge No. 68 15 Genest Ave. 
James A. Haley, Lieutenant, Badge No. 61 15 Courtland St. 
John F. Thomas, Hoseman, Badge No. 62 59 Fourth Ave. 
Edgar Perham, Hoseman, Badge No. 69 55 Arlington St. 
Samuel R. Pendexter, Hoseman, Badge No. 60 

22 West Bowers St. 
Thomas F. Maguire, Hoseman, Badge No. 63, 14 Varney St. 
Edward J. O'Donnell, Hoseman, Badge No. 64 

190 Fletcher St. 
Paul A. Healy, Hoseman, Badge No. 67 412 Gorham St. 
Francis J. O'Laughlin, Hoseman, Badge No. 65, 34 London St. 
Joseph A. Sheehy, Hoseman, Badge No. 6, 145 Cross St. 



23 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 7 
Pine and Stevens Street 

Patrick F. Mahoney, Captain, Badge No. 7 237 Nesmith St. 
Michael J. O'Connor, Lieutenant, Badge No. 70 590 Pine St. 
Herbert W. Hilliard, Hoseman, Badge No. 71, 146 Liberty St. 
Thomas Corrigan, Hoseman, Badge No. 74 40 Crosby St. 
Charles J. Lorigan, Hoseman, Badge No. 76, 23 Houghton St. 
Ludger O. Lamontagne, Hoseman, Badge No. 78 

130 Crawford St. 
William G. Chain, Hoseman, Badge No. 79 45 Coral St- 

James F. Armstrong, Hoseman, Badge No. 134 6 Favor St. 
Frank A. Kappler, Hoseman, Badge No. 75 125 London St. 
John J. Leonard, Hoseman, Badge No. 159 74 Glenwood St. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 8 
Merrimack and Race Streets 

Charles F. Stackpole, Captain, Badge No. 82 25 Grace St. 

William F. Christie, Lieutenant, Badge No. 85 112 Shaw St 

Joseph H. Roges, Hoseman, Badge No. 89 11 Read St. 

William F. McNiff, Hoseman, Badge No. 80 246 Concord St. 

Thomas F. Rafferty, Hoseman, Badge No. 84 85 Branch St. 

Albert X. Hamel, Hoseman, Badge No. 88, 467 Merrimack St. 

Thomas F. Sullivan, Hoseman, Badge No. 86 64 Boylston St. 

James F. Nelligan, Hoseman, Badge No. 8 45 Fairfax St. 

Harry E- Nudd, Hoseman, Badge No. 87 91 Exeter St. 

Joseph E. Hartley, Hoseman, Badge No. 83 15 Floyd St. 



24 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 9 
Rogers and Fairmount Streets 

J. Edward Burns, Captain, Badge No. 9 39 Whitehead Ave. 
George W. Alcott, Lieutenant, Badge No. 92 89 Bellevue St. 
George E. Schofield, Hoseman, Badge No. 90 312 High St. 
James H. Tracy, Hoseman, Badge No. 95 147 Concord St. 
Hugh F- Finnerty, Hoseman, Badge No. 123 

124 Wannalancit St. 
Hugh A. McLaughlin, Hoseman, Badge No. 96, 40 Warwick St. 
George W. Nickerson, Hoseman, Badge No. 91 

178 Mammoth Road 
John H. Quinn, Hoseman, Badge No. 97 247 High St. 

James H. Lannon, Hoseman, Badge No. 93, 819 Lawrence St. 
John J. Miskell, Hoseman, Badge No. 155, 535 Lawrence St. 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 10 
Mammoth Road 

George F. Flint, Captain, Badge No. 160, 63 Woodward Ave. 
Willis S. Holt, Lieutenant, Badge No- 162 125 Foster St. 

John J. McManmon, Hoseman, Badge No. 166 

23 Woodward Ave. 
Joseph F. Convery, Hoseman, Badge No. 164, 19 Bowers St. 
Cornelius J. Brosnan, Hoseman, Badge No. 163, 20 Genest Ave. 
Bartholomew J. Mullen, Hoseman, Badge No. 165 

33 Ellis Ave. 
George J. Tracy, Hoseman, Badge No. 161, 60 Third Ave. 
Thomas M. Whitehead, Hoseman, Badge No. 167 

40 Fifth Ave- 
Frank E. Murphy, Hoseman, Badge No. 98 8 Frye St. 

George A. Crawford, Hoseman, Badge No. 169, 188 Pine St. 



25 



HOSE COMPANY No. 11 
Lawrence, Corner So. Whipple Street 
William A. Dolan, Captain, Badge No. 200, 56 Crowley St. 
Edward Jennings, Lieutenant, Badge No. 201 

859 Lawrence St. 
John D. Finnegan, Hoseman, Badge No. 203 

732 Lawrence St. 
Peter B. Gray, Hoseman, Badge No- 207 71 Whipple St. 

Edward A. Farrell, Hoseman, Badge No. 202, 12 Burns St. 
Walter E. McNally, Hoseman, Badge No. 205, 27 Rhodora St. 
William F. Egan, Hoseman, Badge No. 206, 69 Lilley Ave. 
George T. Underwood, Hoseman, Badge No. 204, 30 Bourne St- 

HOSE COMPANY No. 12 
West Sixth Street 
Charles E. Abare, Captain, Badge No. 220 51 Fifth St. 

Lewis P. Reed, Lieutenant, Badge No. 221, 874 Lakeview Ave. 
Joseph Bernier, Hoseman, Badge No- 223, 263 West Sixth St. 
Peter J. Regan, Hoseman, Badge No. 228, 20 Boylston St. 
Napoleon A. Primeau, Hoseman, Badge No. 224 

929 Lakeview Ave. 
Edward Landry, Hoseman, Badge No. 226, 40 Endicott St. 
Peter J. Deschene, Hoseman, Badge No. 227, 53 Fourth Ave. 
John C. O'Neil, Hoseman, Badge No. 229, 20 Sixth Ave. 

HOSE COMPANY No. 13 
490 Central Street 
James A. Shea, Captain, Badge No. 130, 19 Prospect St. 

Thomas H- Welch, Lieutenant, Badge No. 131, 93 Chapel St. 
Bernard F. Connors, Hoseman, Badge No. 137, 70 Willie St. 
John J. Rinehardt, Hoseman, Badge No. 136 

819 Chelmsford St. 
Henry D. Carpentier, Hoseman, Badge No. 135 

30 West Meadow Road 
William T. Caveney, Hoseman, Badge No. 133 13 Oak St. 

Rosario LeBlue, Hoseman, Badge No. 151, 509 Lakeview Ave. 
C. Herbert Cogswell, Hoseman, Badge No. 138, 27 Mort Ave- 

26 



HOSE COMPANY No. 14 
Lincoln Street 

Orison A. Knapp, Captain, Badge No. 140, 47 Hawthorn St. 
George H. Chapman, Lieutenant, Badge No. 141, 53 Quebec St. 
Charles A. Rock, Hoseman, Badge No. 144, 673 Chelmsford St. 
Edward F. Sullivan, Hoseman, Badge No. 149, 99 Andrews St. 
James P. McCready, Hoseman, Badge No. 145 

150 Mt. Vernon St. 
John N. Emerson, Hoseman, Badge No- 147, 28 Maple St. 
William J. Lane, Hoseman, Badge No. 146, 505 Central St. 
Stanley Urbanek, Hoseman, Badge No. 141, 104 Coburn St. 



TRUCK COMPANY No. 1 
Lawrence Street 

Gilman S. Alcott, Captain, Badge No. 210, 1194 Middlesex St. 
Martin F. McNally, Lieutenant, Badge No. 214 

55 So. Whipple St. 
Thomas J. Gillick, Ladderman, Badge No. 213, 17 Lane St. 
George A- Collins, Ladderman, Badge No. 217 

108 Westford St. 
John J. Lowney, Ladderman, Badge No. 215, 361 Lincoln St. 
John J. Donohoe, Ladderman, Badge No. 211, 76 Agawam St. 
William J. Graham, Ladderman, Badge No. 218 

331 Parkview Ave. 
Michael J. Gildea, Ladderman, Badge No. 219, 72 Swift St. 
Martin Slattery, Ladderman, Badge No. 212, 116 Agawan St. 
William J. Heelon, Ladderman, Badge No. 216, 12 Jennings PI. 



27 



TRUCK COMPANY No. 2 
45 Branch Street 
Daniel W. Hilliard, Captain, Badge No- 121, 20 Osgood St. 
Robert W. Broadbent, Lieutenant, Badge No. 120 

11 Fourth Ave. 
Clarence E. Gillis, Ladderman, Badge No. 122 

111 Mt. Pleasant St. 
Edward T. Gilfillan, Ladderman, Badge No. 124 

76 West Fourth St. 
Frederick V. Fahey, Ladderman, Badge No. 129 

65 Tolman Ave. 
Peter J. O'Rourke, Ladderman, Badge No. 128, 23 Chase Ave. 
Joseph A. Ready, Ladderman, Badge No. 125, 16 Bryant St- 
James E. Burns, Ladderman, Badge No. 127 

90 So. Whipple St. 
Michael H. Creegan, Ladderman, Badge No. 47, 26 Tyler St. 
Wilfrid J. Bourdon, Ladderman, Badge No. 126 

805 Merrimack St. 
Michael J. Miskell, Ladderman, Badge No. 73 

112 So. Highland St. 

TRUCK COMPANY No- 3 
Palmer Street 
Joseph M. G. Burns, Captain, Badge No. 150, 543 Rogers St. 
Edward A. Walsh, Lieutenant, Badge No. 151, 103 School St. 
Daniel F. O'Connor, Ladderman, Badge No. 119, 87 Howard St. 
John J. Hurley, Ladderman, Badge No. 113, 216 Thorndike St. 
William J. Killoy, Ladderman, Badge No. 114, 

178 Mammoth Road 
Joseph W. Kearney, Ladderman, Badge No. 117, 30 Pleasant St. 
Richard D. Marshall, Ladderman, Badge No. 156, 23 Apple St- 
James H. Hogan, Ladderman, Badge No. 157, 11 Autum St. 
John J. Moran, Ladderman, Badge No. 118, 23 Bowden St. 
Harry T. Welch, Ladderman, Badge No. 112, 93 Chapel St. 
Francis J. Donnelly, Ladderman, Badge No. 116, 76 Elm St. 
Francis J. Kelleher, Ladderman, Badge No. 158, 20 Viola St. 
John M. Spillane, Ladderman, Badge No. 152, 36 Putnam Ave- 
Robert Carland, Ladderman, Badge No- 111, 112 Sixth St. 

28 



TRUCK COMPANY No. 4 
West Sixth Street 
Joseph D'Amour, Captain, Badge No. 100, 24 Fisher St. 

George J. Hurley, Lieutenant, Badge No. 110, 24 Reed St. 
John J. McCarthy, Ladderman, Badge No. 101, 150 Fourth Av. 
Joseph E. Fontaine, Ladderman, Badge No. 109, 38 Barker St. 
Edward F. Farrell, Ladderman, Badge No. 107, 12 Third Ave. 
Gilbert G. Fezette, Ladderman, Badge No. 103, 170 Church St. 
Roy N. Symonds, Ladderman, Badge No. 105, 31 June St- 
Edward J Tighe, Ladderman, Badge No. 106, 31 Waterford St, 
John C. Drescher, Ladderman, Badge No. 108, 398 Broadway st. 
Daniel F. Murphy, Ladderman,Badge No. 104, 80 Anderson St. 

PROTECTIVE COMPANY No. 1 
Palmer Corner Middle Street 
George A. Campbell, Captain, Badge No. 170, 640 Andover St. 
Joseph J. Malone, Lieutenant, Badge No. 171, 427 Lincoln St- 
Berry M. Simpson, Patrolman, Badge No. 175, 103 Ennell St. 
William F. Riley, Patrolman, Badge No. 176, 41 West St. 
Harry Young, Patrolman, Badge No. 77, 733 Central St. 
Andrew B. McLaughlin, Patrolman,Badge No.94, 104 Corey st. 
George A. McCarthy, Patrolman, Badge No. 153 

104 Washington St. 
Herman F. Grantz, Patrolman, Badge No. 179, 30 Devine Ave. 
Stephen J. Callahan, Patrolman, Badge No- 209, 29 Mead St. 
Joseph R. Willis, Patrolman, Badge No. 115, 25 Walker Place 
Edmond A. Gendreau, Patrolman, Badge No-154, 467 Moody st. 
Napoleon Grandchamp, Patrolman, Badge No. 173, 

1219 Middlesex St. 
John J. Kane, Patrolman, Badge No. 168, 42 Chapel St. 

Thomas P. McColough, Patrolman, Badge No. 148, 

174 Crosby St. 
John J. Harley, Patrolman, Badge No. 139, 76 W. Forrest St. 
John P. Gillis, Patrolman, Badge No- 174, 261 Third St. 

Michael T. McCann, Patrolman, Badge No. 17, 16 Forrest St. 
Patrick E. Linnehan, Patrolman 69 Newhall St. 

William O. Lussier, Patrolman, Badge No. 102, 226 Ludlam St. 
Philip O. Desmarais, Patrolman, Badge No. 26, 183 Eleventh st. 

29 



FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH 



LOCATION — PALMER STREET ENGINE HOUSE 



Thomas F. Conway, Operator 
Thomas McCormick, Lineman 
Arthur E. King, Lineman 
William C. Martin, Lineman- 

Frederick H. Britton, Lineman 



Ten-Circuit Automatic Repeater with Storage 

Battery of 600 cups 

Miles of wire 213 

Signal Boxes 178 

Engineers' Gongs 10 

Engine House Gongs 16 

Indicators 17 

Tape Register 1 

Bell Strikers 14 



Gong and Indicator at Police Station. 

Gong in Pumping Station. 

Gong on Kearney Square. 

Gong on Tower's Corner. 

Gong on Northern Depot. 

Gong Corner Moody and Aiken Streets. 

Gong Corner Bridge and First Streets. 

Gong Corner Andover and Fayette Streets. 



The strikers are located as follows : Palmer Street En- 
gine House, Varnum School House, High Street Church, 
Court House, No. 1 Engine House, No. 6 Engine House, 
Highland School House, Pawtucketville Engine House, 
Franklin School House, Lawrence Street Engine House, Cor- 
nell Street School House, West Sixth Engine House, 
Sycamore Street School House, Weed Street School House. 

30 



Twenty-Third Annual Report 



of the Board of 



Park Commissioners 



OF THE 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 



1925 



BUCKLAND PRINTING COMPANY 
67 Middle Street, Lowell, Mass. 



TlbllC 



COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 



To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council of the City of 
Lowell, Massachusetts. 

As required by Chapter 28, Section 13, of the Revised 
Laws of Massachusetts, entitled "Public Parks, Playgrounds 
and the Public Domain," the Board of Park Commissioners 
of the City of Lowell has the honor to submit their annual 
report. 

CLARENCE M- WEED, 

Chairman. 



Soard of Park Commissioners 
1925 



CLARENCE M. WEED, 1923-1928 

THOMAS F. McKAY, 1924-1929 

ALEXANDER E. ROUNTREE, 1922-1927 
ROBERT F. MARDEN, 1921-1926 

HARVEY B. GREENE, 1925-1930 



COMMITTEES 

Parks: MR. GREENE, MR. MARDEN, MR. WEED 
Playgrounds: MR. MARDEN, MR. GREENE, MR. WEED 
Trees: MR. ROUNTREE, MR. McKAY, MR. GREENE 
Legislation: MR. McKAY, MR. ROUNTREE, MR. MARDEN 



OFFICERS 

CHAIRMAN 
CLARENCE M. WEED 

SECRETARY 
ALEXANDER E. ROUNTREE 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS 
JOHN WOODBURY KERNAN 




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Financial Report 

1925 



PARKS — GENERAL 

Appropriation Labor $50,00000 

Expense and Supplies 20,000.00 
Credits for the year 1925 ., 8,049.94 

$78,049.94 

Expended for Labor $49,879.94 

Expended for Material and Supplies. . . . 27,761.97 

77,641.91 

Balance $ 408.03 



PARKS — NEW CONSTRUCTION 

Appropriaion $20,000.00 

Expended for Labor $ 8,622.93 

Expended for Material and Supplies . . 11,377.03 

19,999.96 

Balance $ 0.04 

7 



IS 

Appropriations for Anne Street Parkway 

Balance 1925 $ 709.04 

Set aside account of Anne Street Parkway Appro. 709.04 



Balance $ O.Ol 



Appropriation for Acquiring Land at Csntralville Playfield, 

Bridge Street 

Balance 1925 $ 352.06 

Expended acct. of acquiring land 75.00 



$ 277-06 
Set aside acct. of Appro. Acquiring" Land at Cen- 

tralville Playfield, Bridge Street 277.06 

Balance $ 0.00 

Appropriation for Acquiring Land at Lawrence Street at 



Balance 1925 $ 3,388.45 

Set aside acct. Lawrence Street Playground Appro. 3,388.45 

Balance $ 0.00 

Appropriation for Acquiring Land at Circuit Avenue, South 

Lowell 

Balance 1925 $ 3,000.00 

Expended acct. of Acquiring Land 949.00 

$ 2,051.00 
Set aside acct. Acquiring Land at Circuit Avenue, 

South Lowell 2,051.00 

Balance $ O.OO 

8 



Morey Street Playground Appropriation 

Balance 1925 '. $ 5,047.81 

Expended acct. of Acquiring and Developing Land 373.55 

$ 4,674.26 
Set aside acct. Morey Street Playground Appro. 4,674.26 

Balance $ 0.00 



Appropriation for Construction of North Common Comfort 

Station 

Balance 1925 $ 234.96 

Expended acct. of Construction of Comfort Station 52.80 

$ 182.16 
Set aside acct. of Construction of North Common 

Comfort Station 182.16 

Balance $ 0.00 



Appropriation for Acquiring Land at John J. O'Donnell 
Playground 

Balance 1925 $ 9,221.40 

Additional Appro, for Acquiring Land — 1926. . . . 6.000.00 

$15,221.40 
Expended acct. of Acquiring Land 13,730.32 

$ 1,491.08 
Set aside acct. Appro, for Acquiring Land at John 

J. O'Donnell Playground 1,491.08 

Balance $ 0.00 

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Riverside Street Park Loan 

Balance 1925 $ 4,791.67 

Expended acct. developing Riverside Street Park. 303-99 

$ 4.487.68 
Set aside acct. of Acquiring Land Riverside Street 4,487.68 

Balance $ 0.00 



Appropriation for Development of Shedd Playground 

Balance 1925 $99,850.00 

Expended acct. Development of Shedd Playground 58,188.92 

$41,661.08 
Set aside acct. Development of Shedd Playground 41,661.08 

Balance $ 0.00 



Appropriation for Acquiring Land at Ayer Field, 
Woodward Avenue 

Balance 1925 $ 54.30 

Set aside acct. Acquiring Land at Ayer Field, 

Woodward Avenue 54.30 

Balance $ 0.00 



11 





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PARK AREAS AND THEIR VALUATION — 1925 



Anne Street Parkway 0.6401 Acres $28,000. 

Boulevard Park 6.031 " 5,255. 

Cardinal O'Connell Parkway 0.114 " 25,844. 

Centralville Playfield 10.1129 " 24,521. 

Chambers Street Playground .... 1.2681 " 5,523. 

Circuit Avenue Playground 5.1301 " 949. 

City Hall and Mem. Grounds 0.50 " 65,700. 

Coburn Square 0.252 " 1,000. 

Colonial Avenue Riverbank 3.50 2,000. 

Con Rogers and Nesmith Streets. . 0.012 622. 

Fayette Street Playground 0.170 " 2,000. 

First Street Oval 12.2757 " 31,416. 

First Street Parkway 0.6953 " 18,000. 

Franklin Square 0.058 " 1,500. 

Glacial Oval 100. 

Harris Oval 0.12 " 366. 

Highland Park 5.5498 ■" 8,450. 

Hillside Park 0.061 " 80. 

Hovey Square (Changed to Butman) 0.010 50. 

Hutchinson Square 0.037 150. 

John T. Durkin Playground 1.525 " 6,000. 

John J. O'Donnell Playground . 14.1448 " 58,568. 

Lenox Square 0.181 " 1,500. 

Lincoln Square 0.016 " 200. 

*Lucy Larcom Park 0.50 " 21,970. 

Mansur Square 0.05 " 150- 

Middlesex Park 0.034 " 200. 

Monument Square 0.092 " 15,000. 

Morey School Playground 1.2052 " 4,873. 

Mt. Vernon Park 0.50 " 4,350. 



15 



North Common 11.39 " 100,769. 

Parker-Spalding Park 0.043 " 60. 

Paul T. Kittredge Park 1.77 " 20,000. 

Pawtucket St. Park at North'n Canal 0.911 " 6,620- 

Pawtucketville Playground 4.5932 " 12,413. 

Penniman Square 0.051 450. 

Princeton Square 0.028 " 150. 

Raven Road Park 0.083 " 180. 

Richmond Avenue Playground . 0.7048 " 2,500. 

Riverside Park, South Lowell . . 0.105 " 184. 

Riverside Street Park 0.4248 " 6,248. 

Rogers Fort Hill Park 34.40 " 150,000. 

Shedd Playground 5600 " 108,189. 

South Common 22.48 " 200,000. 

Thomas F. Mann Square 0.0825 " 1,600. 

Tyler Park 1.81 " 8,000. 

Wannalancit Park 1.081 " 6,976. 

Water Works Square 0.047 " 500. 

Washington Park 2.894 " 32,000. 

Wyman Park 5.22 " 32,088. 



208.9033 Acres $1,023,264. 

♦Not under the direct charge of Park Commission. Held by Chairman 
of Park Commission and Mayor as Trustees. 



16 



Board of Park Commissioners 

CITY OF LOWELL 



March 23, 1926. 

Honorable John J. Donovan, and the Municipal Council of the 
City of Lowell : 

Gentlemen : 

I take pleasure in transmitting, herewith, the annual 
report of the Board of Park Commissioners. 

The year just closed has seen, in many respects, a very 
remarkable development in the use of the parks and play- 
grounds of the city- The new opportunities for tennis and 
baseball have been utilized to a greater extent than ever 
before and the season's experience has abundantly demonst- 
rated the necessity of these under the present social condi- 
tions of our people. 

Important developments in the construction of new 
centers of recreation have taken place during the year so 
that at the end of another season, the city will be more 
adequately provided for opportunities for public recreation 
than a great majority of cities in America. Fortunately, these 
areas are distributed throughout nearly all parts of our city 
so that they serve, to a great extent, our whole population. 

One of the most important phases of this new construc- 
tion work has been that relating to Shedd Park where an 
elaborate scheme of opportunities for out door play and 

17 



entertainment has been nearly completed. This will be finished 
early the coming summer and will mark a very distinct 
advance in the park system of the city. 

The Board of Park Commissioners wish to express to 
Superintendent John W. Kernan and his associates, especially 
to Mr. Arthur C. Sullivan and the playground teachers, their 
hearty thanks for the splendid work they have done during 
the year and the fine spirit of co-operation that has prevailed 
throughout the department. We wish also to express to His 
Honor, the Mayor John J. Donovan, to the City Council, and 
to the various heads of the city departments, our obligations 
for help in many ways. We also are indebted to the news- 
papers of the city for a great amount of publicity which has 
helped to extend the use of the parks and playgrounds and has 
brought to the general public, a knowledge of the important 
events which have been taking place. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CLARENCE M. WEED, 

Chairman. 



18 



Superintendents Report 



To the Board of Park Commissioners. 

Gentlemen : 

I herewith most respectfully submit my annual report 
of the work done under your direction in the Park System 
during the year ending December 31, 1925. 

The year just closed has been the banner year for Park 
activities, and development since the Board was established. 
New areas were acquired and development plans made, which 
Avere carried out in so far as funds available would permit. 
It is hoped that sufficient money will be available in 1926 to 
complete work already under way, which was started last 
year. 

At O'Donnell Playground on Gorham Street (formerly 
the old Fair Grounds) a section along the street was graded 
and laid out following a definite plan. A foundation was 
laid for four Tennis Courts and they are now ready for 
a top surface the coming year- With the installation of the 
back stop wires, they will then be ready for use. Between 
the Courts and the street there will be a fine stretch of lawn 
area in which a number of trees will be planted giving shade, 
where it is very much needed. 

In Centralville, development work was started on the 
new Centralville Playfield situated on Bridge Street and 
which was formerly known as the Hall Land. This tract 
comprises about nine acres and was acquired late in 1924 
for the assessed value, and during last year an additional 
strip of two and one-half acres was purchased. This too 

19 







\ 







M 










i 



•^4? 






I* 



was acquired at the assessed valuation. The acquisition of 
these two parcels was a little unusual, in as much as all of 
our recent additional park land was taken over at a price in 
excess of the assessed valuation. This gives us a much needed 
frontage on Richardson Street, making the field much more 
accessible. Here also a definite development plan was made 
and adopted by the Board. Work was started during the 
summer and continued throughout the remainder of the year. 
Coming in contact with a bunch of ledge retarded us some- 
what in our grading, but we have been able to make two base- 
ball diamonds and lay the foundation for four tennis courts, 
aside from the general grading of the grounds. It is hoped 
to complete the tennis courts this spring, and also carry out 
a general scheme of planting, especially of trees. Much 
should be done along this line as there is hardly any shade 
here, during the hot summer days. 

Work was started late in the summer at Pawtucketville 
Playground, located at the corner of Mammoth Road and 
Woodward Avenue in Pawtucketville. The slope in the rear 
was cut down, using the same to make the steep fill on the 
Mammoth Road side of the field. In doing this a countless 
number of boulders were met, necessitating the drilling and 
blowing of same, before they could be handled. We expect 
to continue this work another year making room for a few 
tennis courts and other playground games, so that this section 
of the city will be fairly taken care of in the way of facilities 
for out-door activities. 

At Wannalancit Park on Varnum Avenue Ave continued 
the Iron Fence on top of the riverbank wall near the falls 
a distance of 266 lineal feet, and graded off between that 
point and the roadway, sewing same down to grass. 

We have definite plans made for both the riverbank 
park on Riverside Street in Pawtucketville, and the First 
Street Oval in Centralville, but the costs of both projects 
are much beyond our means for the present. 

21 



The Shedd Bequest of $100,000.00 became available in 
the early part of the year for the development of Shedd 
Playground- A careful study was made of the project, toget- 
her with the amount of money at hand and it was finally 
agreed that it was a physical impossibility to develop the 
whole area with the fund. Accordingly plans were made for 
two-thirds of the playground which would include about 
thirty-seven acres. They called for a running track, soccer 
field, two baseball fields, eight tennis courts, children's play- 
ground, open-air theatre, swimming pool, wading pool for 
little children, a pond at the lower end, 11,000 square yards 
of walks and drives, besides a choice planting list of shrubs 
and trees. Careful consideration was given to whether we 
should do the work ourselves or let the job at contract. The 
latter course was taken because more work could be accom- 
plished for the money available and it was desirable to get the 
work done as quickly as possible. Bids were called for and 
the construction job was finally awarded to Mr. Frederick F. 
Meloy, being the lowest among nine bidders, and also a local 
man. He handled the work in a business-like manner and 
nearly completed his contract before the cold weather caught 
him, forcing him to quit work for the winter. Only a few 
thousand dollars worth of work remains, which will be 
finished in the early spring. In the scheme of development 
of the playground, the building of a field house was con- 
sidered. Late in the summer plans were drawn for such a 
building having toilet facilities, showers, lockers, and quarters 
for the change of clothing. It was decided that a building 
of this sort was a necessity, because of the nature of the 
activities planned. After bids had been called for, it was 
found impossible to let a contract, because our balance avail- 
able from the Shedd Bequest was insufficient. The bids on 
the work ran higher than was anticipated. It is hoped that 
additional funds will be provided this year, so that the field 
house may be speedily built. 

The maintenance of our parks is beginning to grow 
quite considerably, as we are constantly adding one or two 

23 



acres yearly. Then again they are used to a greater degree 
than ever before. Much litter accumulates and the necessary 
upkeep is constantly rising. 

TREES 

Strict care and attention has been given to our street 
trees during the past year, their condition being such that 
a crew of men was maintained throughout the year on tree 
work. The multitudinous number of wires that are strung 
through and about them are responsible for many defects, 
while others, because of the smooth paving laid too closely 
to the roots, have had a hard time to exist, and many times 
die. Our records show that we have taken care of 1102 trees 
having decayed or dangerous limbs, 209 trees whose branches 
have been trimmed on account of too much shade, and cut 
down 71 trees which were dead. We planted 350 new trees 
scattered in all sections of the city, so that our replacements 
exceeded the number lost. We hope to conduct an intensive 
tree planting campaign this year, as we all consider them an 
asset to the citv. 



America's most popular health medicine today is out- 
door recreation. It is nature's own route to sturdy bodies and 
sound nerves. 

With a limited amount of funds at our disposal for 
playground work, we have striven hard to keep abreast of 
the times and with the exception of one or two sister cities 
in the State, have been unsurpassed in our accomplishments. 
Fourteen different playgrounds were operated during the 
year, being located in the most congested sections of the city. 
We were extremely fortunate in having an excellent corps of 
supervisors who were keen and alert in their work at all 
times. The usual playground games were taught, and 
schedules of volley ball, baseball games, etc., were carefully 

25 



arranged and diligently carried out. It was really surprising 
to witness the great interest the children displayed in their 
league games and the loyalty they showed for their respective 
teams. Fair play was was more in evidence than ever before; 
and that being one of our aims in playground work, I felt 
amply repaid for all our league activities. 

One of the major events of the season, was held in mid- 
summer at the South Common Playground. It took the form 
of a doll carriage parade, and had entries from all the play- 
grounds of the city, there being about seventy-five in all. 
Great interest was aroused by the children, not so much for 
the best individual display, but more in the interest of their 
respective playgrounds. Prizes were offered for the best dis- 
play, and the judges in charge had a very difficult task to pick 
the winners. Besides keeping the interest of the children, it 
brought into play the industrial side of our playground work, 
and the patterns and designs exhibited were far beyond our 
expectations. 

With our wading pool at the South Common opportu- 
nity is offered for swimming instruction to the playground 
children- The pool is shallow, yet deep enough for beginners, 
and offers a safe spot, and at the same time centrally located 
to serve two-thirds of our playgrounds. We placed in charge 
a young man thoroughly efficient in the art, who conducted 
daily classes with very satisfactory results. 

Mr. Lewis MacBrayne of the Massachusetts Public 
Safety Council, kindly addressed our supervisors at the start 
of the season on the prevention of accidents, which proved 
a source of interest, and very beneficial to us all. It is surely 
worth noting that we went through the season holding the 
attention of 5,000 children daily, without having a serious 
accident. 

:.- - Tennis held the attention of a goodly number of play- 
ground children during the summer and is acknowledged 
by all as one of the best games for the development of the 
body. The regular yearly tournament was held at the High- 

26 



land Courts, bringing together many contestants, as well as 
drawing a large gallery of spectators. 

The usual closing Playground Exercises were held at 
the Municipal Auditorium on September 2 where the play- 
ground children portrayed "The Spirit of Americanization". 
They showed the dances of the various nations, with the 
dance of Liberty as indicative of the desire to Americanize, 
and its accomplishment. The children themselves made their 
own costumes, under the guidance of the supervisors, and 
they were indeed a credit to their ability along these lines. 
The exercises were given in the afternoon as sort of a dress 
rehearsal for the playground children themselves, and re- 
peated in the evening before a capacity audience of grown ups. 

During the month of May a marble contest sponsored 
by the Courier-Citizen newspaper was of interest, as it 
brought together a large number of playground children. 
Suitable rings were provided for them on the South Common, 
where the trials and finals were held. Keen rivalry prevailed 
during the games, and all the contestants had a large follow- 
ing of "rooters". The winner of the contest was given a free 
trip to Atlantic City, where he competed with the champions 
of many other cities of the United States. 

Our public bath house on the Boulevard was operated 
again this year in the usual efficient manner, having the same 
force of assistants and life-guards in charge. Many enjoyed 
the privileges offered here and it was no uncommon sight to 
see thousands there on a hot summer day. 

Moving picture shows were given during the summer 
months in different localities of the city four evenings a week, 
and drew large gatherings, not only of children, but grown- 
ups as well. This form of entertainment is inexpensive and 
looked forward to by many. 

Winter sports were patronized to their fullest extent 
last winter, people of all ages taking part in same. Good 
facilities were offered for skating as well as for using the 

27 



toboggan slide at Fort Hill Park- The areas are well lighted 
in the evening, so that we obtain the maximum use. Of 
course it is essential to give these sports proper care and 
attention by our employees of the department, as well as 
proper police protection, which again make our maintenace 
charges rise. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

That sufficient funds be provided for the completion 
of the development of O'Donnell Playground, Centralville 
Playfield and Pawtucketville Playground. 

That a play area be acquired in a fast growing com- 
munity, somewhere between Wentworth Avenue and Clark 
Road. There are a few desirable open spaces from which 
a plot could be had at present, far more reasonable than if 
delayed for future years. 

That an additional appropriation be made for the. erec- 
tion of a suitable field house at Shedd Playground. Our funds 
left from the Shedd Bequest are not sufficient for a building 
in keeping with the playground development there, when 
completed. 

In conclusion permit me to thank the Board for its 
support given during the year, employees of the department 
for their faithfulness, the city officials, the playground 
teachers, the newspapers, and the public in general for the 
many kind favors rendered; and the spirit of co-operation 
that has been shown the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN W. KERNAN, 
Engineer and Superintendent. 



28 



EIGHTY -FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Lowell City Library 



THIRTY -SIXTH REPORT 



OF THE 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 



OF THE CITY OF LOWELL 
MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR THE YEAR NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY FIVE 



.4. 



Kilburn Printing Company Old Grist Mill 

19 2 6 



ADMINISTRATION OF THE LIBRARY 1925. 



Board of Trustees 

Hon. John J. Donovan, Mayor, Ex-officio 

Hugh J. Molloy Term expires 1926 

Miller Bellefontaine " 1927 

Henry H. Harris " " 1928 

John T. Donehue, D. D. S " "' 1929 

Edward J. Welch, M. D : " " 1930 



Organization 

Hon. John J. Donovan, Chairman 
John T. Donehue, Vice-Chairman 
Frederick A. Chase, Clerk 

Librarian 

Frederick A. Chase 



Asst. Librarian 

Alice M. Myers 



Assistants 



Alice L. Donehue Rose E. Reilly 

(On leave of absence) Amey French 

Annette Lemaitre Alice Bertrand 

Blanche Gray Esther Freeman 

(Substitute) 
Bindery 
Walter H. Gilman Roy Frenette 



Superintendent of Reading Room 

Harry C. Bowen 

James Dacey, Assistant 



Librarian of Children's Room 
Eloise B. Hills 



Library Trustees' Report of 1925 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES FOR 1925 



To the Honorable City Council of the City of Lowell: 

Gentlemen : — The Trustees of the City Library herewith 
present their annual report for the year 1925. The circulation 
of books for the year showed a total of 263,075. Our report for 

1924 showed a total of 204,609. The increase for 1925 of 58,466 
was due partly to an increased use of the Library and partly to a 
new method of estimating the School use of our books. 

Heretofore we have reckoned the school circulation by count- 
ing once only the books sent to the schools. We find it to be the 
custom in the Boston Library and in many others to consider that 
books so loaned are circulated at least once a month. In fairness 
to our library we are adopting this method of reckoning our cir- 
culation and are able to make a better showing. We cannot, how- 
ever compete with other libraries that have a system of branches. 
The furnishing of books to be circulated in the schools is be- 
coming an important part of our work and is capable of great ex- 
pansion. We shall need many more duplicate of our books to 
supply the needs of the schools. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Receipts 

Appropriations by Municipal Council $29,500.00 

Fines, etc 1,010.58 

$30,510.58 



4 Library Trustees' Report of 1925 

Expenditures 

Salaries - $23,496.84 

Lighting - 918.00 

Binding 1,526.51 

Periodicals 1,063.54 

Books 762.30 

Sundries— Printing $384.85 

Transportation 284.54 

Equipment and 

Hardware 345.74 

Paste 77.25 

Other Supplies 294.64 

All other 707.06 

$ 2,095.08 

Delivery Stations :~ 625.73 

Returned to City Treasurer - 22.58 

— $30,510 58 

JOHN DAVIS FUND 

Income for 1925 

Cash on hand at last report $ 78.71 

Interest and dividend earnings on invest- 
ments and loans '.... 4,758.80 

$ 4,837.51 

Expenditures 

Transfers to John Davis Income Fund .... $ 4,749.76 

Cash on hand Dec. 31, 1925 87.75 

$ 4,837.51 

JOHN DAVIS INCOME FUND 
Receipts 

Transfers from John Davis Fund $ 4,749.76 

Expenditures 

Books purchased for the Library $ 4,594.97 

Cash balance Dec. 31, 1925 154.79 

$ 4,749.76 



Library Trustees' Report of 1925 



JOHN DAVIS FUND 
List of Securities 

Bonds 

Rate of 

Name Due Interest 

Boston & Maine R. R 1944 4^% 

Boston & Maine R: R 1926 4 % 

Boston & Maine R. R 1929 4^% 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R 1954 4 % 

Illinois Central R. R 1952 Z]/ 2 % 

Boston & Albany R. R 1952 Zy 2 % 

Atch., Top & Sante Fe .....1995 4 % 

Hartford, Conn 1933 Ay 2 % 

City of Fall River 1926 4 % 

City of Baltimore 1958 4 % 

City of Waterbury, Conn 1950 Ay A % 

Liberty Loan Coupon Bond 1938 4%% 

Liberty Loan Coupon Bond 2nd ....1942 4%% 

Commonwealth of Mass 1941 3 % 



Railroad Stock 

No. Price per 

Shares Share 

27 Boston & Maine (Common) 42 

1 B. & M. Preferred Stock (Class C) 80 

39 Boston & Albany 172 

1 Nashua & Lowell 110 



Manufacturing Stock 

No. Price per 
Shares Share 
12 Nat'l Fabric and Finishing Co. 75 



Miscellaneous Stock 



No. 
Shares 

.14 American Tel. & Tel. 
12 Lowell Gas Lieht Co. 



Co. 



Price per 
Share 

146 

60 



Par 
Value 
$11,000.00 

10,000.00 
5,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 
4,000.00 
1,000.00 

10,000.00 
4,000.00 
5,000.00 
4,000.00 

10.000.00 
6.000.00 
2,000.00 

$92,000,000 



Amount 

$1,134.00 

80.00 

6,708.00 

110.00 

$8,032.00 



Amount 

$ 900.00 



Amount 

$2,044.00 

720.00 



$2,764.00 



Library Trustees' Report oE 1925 



Bank Stocks 



No. Price per 

Shares Share 

9 Appleton Nat. Bank, Lowell 135 

3 Old Lowell Nat. Bank, Lowell 120 

2 Wamesit Nat. Bank, Lowell 120 

11 Union Nat. Bank, Lowell 260 



Amount 
$1,215.00 

360.00 

240.00 

2,860.00 

$4,675.00 



Mortgage Note 



A. H. 



$2,000.00 



Summary of Investments and Cash Assets 



Value Value 

May 1, 1925 May 7, 1926 

Registered Bonds $ 92,000.00 $ 92,000.00 

Railroad Stocks 6,958.50 8,032.00 

Manufacturing Stocks .... 1,320.00 900.00 

Miscellaneous' Stocks .... 2,613.00 2,764.00 

Bank Stocks 4,635.00 4,675,00 

Mortgage Notes 2,000.00 2,000.00 

Cash in Bank 2,104.21 786.50 



Increase Decrease 



1,073.50 

151.00 
40.00 



420.00 



1,317.71 



$111,63071 $111,157.50 $ 1,264.50 $ 1,737.71 



The undersigned, a committee of the Trustees appointed to check up 
the List of Securities of the John Davis Fund, to-day called on the City 
Treasurer, who produced for their examination the above listed securities. 

Henry H. Harris. 

Elizabeth B. Reidy. 
Lowell, Massachusetts, 
May 7, 1926. 



Library Trustees' Report of 1925 



STATISTICS IN FORM ADOPTED BY THE 
AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 



City Library, Lowell, Mass. 

Annual Report for Year Ending December 31, 1925. 

Population 1920 Census, 112,759. 

Free for Lending and Reference. 

Two delivery stations, namely one at Davis Square, one in Cen- 
tralville and several deposit stations. 

Main Library open 304 days during the year. 72 hours a week 
for lending. 72 hours for reading. 

Library open Sundays (Oct. to June) for reference and reading 
2 to 9 P. M. 

Reading Room open Sundays, 9 A. M. to 9 P. M. 

Number of volumes at beginning of year 121.069 

Number of volumes added by purchase 2,969 

Number of Volumes added during year by gift or ex- 
change -.-- 28 

Number of Volumes added during year by binding ma- 
terial not otherwise counted ----- - '.... 147 

Total number at end of year ■...-. 124,213 

Number of newspapers, periodicals, proceedings and 

transactions of learned societies currently received 280 

Number of volumes of fiction lent for home use. Adult 

104,203. Juvenile 66,296. Total 170,499 

Total Number of Volumes lent for home use. Adult 
127,005. Children's Room 50,652. School Dept. 
64,140. Other Circulation 21,278. Total circulation 263,075 

Per cent, fiction lent of total volumes lent 64+ 

Number of borrowers registered during year 2,303 

Total numbered of registered borrowers 44,666 

Registration period five years 

Per cent, registered borrowers of population served ... . 30.8 



Library Trustees' Report of 1925 



LIST OF DONORS OF 1925 



Vo 

Abbey, Mrs. E. A 

Beck, Jas. M 

Bogue Institute 

Brackinridge, S. P 

Brogan, Frank M. 

Chamber of Commerce — Lowell 145 

Children's Foundation 

Christie, Prof. F. A 

City of Lawrence 

Derby, Henry A 

Evening Bulletin, Philadelphia - 

Fisher, Prof. Irving 

Frank, Glenn 

Haverhill Public Library 

Hobbes, Franklyn - 

Metropolitan Life Ins. Co 

National Society, D. A. R 

New York Public Library , 

Rice, Mrs. H. R 14 

Secretary of Commonwealth 6 

University of Delaware, Pres 1 

185 



LIST OF JURORS 



FOR THE 



CITY OF LOWELL 



FOR THE YEAR 



1926 







A 

Abbott, Leon D., 5 Parkview Ave., foreman. 

Abrams, Leo, 20 Grace St., clerk. 

Achin Victor, 749 Merrimack St., dealer. 

Adams, John M., 54 Gates St., painter. 

Aham, Frederick T., 40 Fay St., chauffeur. 

Alden, Frank A., 32 Lane St., clerk. 

Allan, David, 64, Epping St., clerk. 

Allard, Joseph J., 116 Ennell St., storekeeper. 

Amadon, Fred C, 760 Stevens St., grocer. 

Anderson, Walter R., 92 Grand St., salesman. 

Andrews, John A., 11 So. Whipple St., leatheworker. 

Andrews, John R., 6 Wood St., trainman. 

Armitstead, Arthur B., 628 Wilder, Merr'k Mfg. Co. 

Armitstead, Robert R., 300 Varnum Ave., dealer. 

Armstrong, Robert J., 6 Favor St., U. S. C. Co. 

Ashe, Moses E., 1401 Gorham St., machinist. 

Asquith, Sam, 36 Chatham St., merchant. 

Avery, Mark A., 19 Leroy St., foreman. 

Ayer, Lorenzo A., 557 Varnum Ave., gardener. 

Ayer, William A., 27 Varnum Ave., plumber. 

Ayotte, William, 10 Gershom Ave., machinist. 



LIST OP JURORS 



B 



Badmington, Edward W., 11 Usher St., manager. 

Bagshaw, Arthur H., 92 Jenness St., letter carrier. 

Bailey, Edward T.. 498 Chelmsford St., manager. 

Bailey, John S., 498 Chelmsford St., mechanic. 

Bakey, James, 43 Wamesit St., laborer. 

Bancroft, Frank M., 16 Brookside St., motorman. 

Barber, Jesse, 8-76 Congress St., bleachery. 

Barber, Joseph, 252 Pawtucket St., manufacturer. 

Barlofsky, Archie, 71 Dover St., clerk. 

Barnes, Thomas F., 21 Fairgrove Ave., clerk. 

Baron, William N., 889 Moody St., retired. 

Barry, John E.. 500 Varnum Avenue, laborer. 

Barry, Patrick J., 28 Chippewa St., laborer. 

Barry, Timothy F.. 94 High St., janitor. 

Barry, Walter F., 11 Dracut St., chauffeur. 

Barton, Cyrus, 78 South Walker St., B. & M. Shops. 

Basnett, George B., 77 Andover St., barber. 

Bassett, Cyrus R., 32 Meadowcroft St., U. S. C. Co. 

Baxter, Frederick J., 34 May St. stock clerk. 

Bean, Ralph M., 204 Clark Road, secretary. 

Beane, Thomas J., 104 Pleasant St., life insurance. 

Beane, Thomas J. Jr., 104 Pleasant St., stitcher. 

Beaudry, Francois, 111 Fulton St., teamster. 

Beaucage, Arthur A., 536 School St., agent. 

Beaulieu, Leo H., 202 Hildreth St., clerk. 

Bechard, Ferdinand W., 25 Woodward Ave., dealer. 

Beck, Edmond, 165 Warwick St., laborer. 

Bergeron, Albert, 35 Mt. Vernon St., real estate. 

Bergeron, Philippe O., 559 Fletcher St., musician. 

Bernard, Arthur J., 32 Hildreth St., chauffeur. 

Bernard, Pierre N., 11 Gilmore St., barber. r 

Bill, Freeman M., 823 Andover St., dealer. T 

Bissonette, John, 47, Mt. Washington St., painter. 

Blacktin, Howard W., 163 Congress St., spinner. 

Blanchard, William D., 74 South Loring St., helper. 

Blessington, Andrew J., 43 ^Cedar St., painter. 

Blessington, Thomas J., 43 Cedar St., barber. 

Boissonneault, Thomas Jr., 917 Lakeview Ave., dealer 

Bolan, William, 4 West Eleventh St., machinist. 

Bonin, Honore. 90 Aiken St., barber. 

Booth, Arthur R. G., 353 Walker St., chemist. 

Booth, Henry V., 344 Stackpole St., beamer. 

Booth. William T., 18 Fourth St., beamer. 

Bordeleau, Emile, 865 Moody St., salesman. 

Bordeleau, Lucien, 120 Cabot St., machinist. 



LIST OF JURORS 



Bosca, Joseph H., 199 Cross St., clerk. 
Boucher, George H., 125 Dalton St., dealer. 
Boudreau, Frank M., 55 Crawford St., clerk. 
Boulanger, Joseph E., 183 Mammoth Rd., operative. 
Boulger, John B., 155 Humphrey St., merchant. 
Bowen, Elmer L., 178 Pine St., manufacturer. 
Bowen, Harold A., 46 Putnam Ave., salesman. 
Bowers, Jonathan, 169 Merrimack St., custodian. 
Bowers, Varnum, 169 Merimack St., clerk. 
Bowles, Willis H., 261 Hildreth St., fixer. 
Box, John W., 7 Lyons St., beltmaker. 
Boyle, Frank B., 41 State St., clerk. 
Boyle, James S., 214 Pawtucket St., bookkeeper. 
Bradley, Henry T., 51 Newhall St., laborer. 
Bradley James J., 37 Whipple St., clerk. 
Brady, Edward P., 1032 Gorham St., dealer. 
Brady, Francis, 69 High St., moulder. 
Brady, Peter F., 661 Broadway, painter. 
Branchaud, Alberic A., 3 Dana St., manager. 
Branchaud, Charles E., 9 Somerset St., clerk. 
Brassard, Henri J., 68 Mt. Hope St., chauffeur. 
Brassard, Maurice J., 4 Butterfield St., clerk. 
Brassard, Peter, 26 Ash St., chauffeur. 
Brautigan, Willie, 16 Common St., operative. 
Breen, Arthur R., 48 Methuen St., clerk. 
Breen, John P., 9 Lyon St., loomfixer. 
Brennan, George F., 31 Crowley St., steamfitter. 
Brennan, George F., 54 Grand St., manager. 
Brennan, Harry, 169 Pleasant St., salesman. 
Brennan, John L., 11 Common Ave., jeweler. 
Brierly, Eugene L., 74 So. Loring St., painter. 
Briggs, Harry C, 224 Foster St., paymaster. 
Brigham, Charles R., 99 South Walker St., manager. 
Brimigion, Caleb, 58 Agawam St., bleachery. 
Brock, Charles F., 47 Seventh Ave., clerk. 
Brogan, Joseph A., 80 Mt. Washington St., machinist. 
Brooks, Milton M., 39 Leverett St., machinist. 
Brosnan, Patrick T., 38 Second Ave., salesman. 
Brown, Harold A., 58 Crowley St,, paymaster. 
Brown, James T., 53 Tolman Ave., operative. 
Brown, Robert John, 25 White St., laborer. 
Bruce, Walter C, 515 Varnum Ave., manufacturer. 
Bruin, John H., 161 School St., insurance agent. 
Brunelle, Donat J., 849 Moody St., clerk. 
Brunelle, Lucien, 837 Moody St., druggist. 
Buckley, James H., 23 Starbird St., cigarmaker. 
Buckley, William F., 49 Walnut St., leather worker. 
Buey, John W., 49 Dunfey St., stage manager. 



LIST OF JURORS 



Billiard, Gardner P., 683 Andover St., dealer. 

Buote, Michael, 409 Moody St., operative. 

Burbeck, William J., 32 Sheldon St., retired. 

Burger, Nicholas B., 95 Fourth St., dealer. 

Burke, Daniel J., 15 Barrington St., leather worker. 

Burke, Frank, 37 Bowden St., L. E. L. Corp. 

Burke, John Joseph, 21 Cascade Ave., chemist. 

Burke, Joseph, 11 West St., weaver. 

Burke, William A., 227 West London St., insurance agent. 

Burke, William P., 30 Abbott St., watchman. 

Burns, Charles H., 84 Methuen St., barber. 

Burns, Edward, 84 Pleasant St., salesman. 

Burns, Francis A., 117 Stackpole St., bookbinder. 

Burns, George E., 31 Bourne St., clerk. 

Burns, George E., 19 Putnam Ave., clerk.. 

Burns, James E., 23 State St., laborer. 

Burns, John, 173 Chapel St., clerk. 

Burns, John F., 173 Chapel St., butcher. 

Burns, John J., 7 Chase St,, laborer. 

Burns, John H., 4 Kimball Ave., clerk. 

Burns, Stephen, 282 Fayette St., operative. 

Busby, Thomas Jr., 35 Mead St., operative 

Butler, John R., 159 Broadway, chauffeur. 

Byam, Arnold A., 12 Albert St., real estate. 

Byam, George A. Jr., 31 Albert St., real estate. 

Cuff, Thomas S., 195 Moore St., druggist. 

Byam, Otis, 79 Canton St., milk dealer. 



C 



Caddeli, John B., 82 Norcross St., pattern maker. 
Caddell, Peter M., 94 Viola St., overseer. 
Cahill, George W., 259 Worthen St., laborer. 
Cain, Frank P., 17 Hudson St., manager. 
Callahan, Daniel F., 22 Second Ave., engineer. 
Callahan, George J., 157 Pleasant St., steamfitter. 
Callahan, George T., 122 Humphrey St., advertiser. 
Callahan, John J., 414 Gorham St., shoe cutter. 
Callahan, Leo J., 79 Highland Ave., clerk. 
Callahan, Philip H., 82 Beacon St., painter. 
Calnan, Michael J., 882 Gorham St., U. S. C. Co. 
Cameron, Donald M., 328 Wilder St., manufacturer. 
Campbell, Edward Gaston, 15 Fred St., dealer. 
Campbell, Frederick J., 53 Keene St., asst. supt. 
Campbell, George L., 87 Belrose Ave., clerk. 
Campbell, John H., 53 Keene St., chauffeur. 



LIST OF JURORS 



Canney, Arthur D., 294. Varnum Ave., salesman. 
Carey, George W. F., 20 Fort Hill Ave., clerk. 
Carey, William F., 127 High St., laborer. 
Carey, William D., 58 Keene St., clerk. 
Carey, William J., 11 Caddell Ave., operative. 
Carney, John L., 634 Broadway, laborer. 
Caron, Thomas, 19 Phebe Ave., operative. 
Carpenter, Henry T., 169 Meadowcroft St., electrician. 
Carr, Edward B., 855 Central St., burlap manufacturer. 
Carroll, Daniel F., 74 Harris Ave., master plumber. 
Carroll, James E., 71 Third St., clerk. 
Carroll, John J., 97 Crawford St., machinist. 
Carroll, Michael D., 118 South Highland St., plumber. 
Carroll, Thomas J., 113 Woodward Ave., operative. 
Carty, Thomas, 41 Hampshire St., operative. 
Carty, Thomas P., 179 Middlesex St., clerk. 
Carufel, Emile, 822 Moody St., operative. 
Cashman, John J., 68 Varnum St., clerk. 
Cashman, John J., 506 Lawrence St., clerk. 
Cashman, Martin F., 68 Varnum St., stage hand. 
Casey, James J., 815 Chelmsford St., salesman. 
Casey, Jeremiah, 115 Andrews St., boilermaker. 
Casserly, Patrick, 179 School St., inspector. 
Cassidy, Francis J., 148 Pleasant St., tanner. 
Cassidy, Frank A., 13 Read St., assistant janitor. 
Cassidy, George M., 825 Chelmsford St., chauffeur. 
Cavanaugh, John H., 139 Cross St., clerk. 
Cavanaugh, Patrick P., 139 Cross St., clerk. 
Cavanaugh, Thomas, 48 Methuen St., chauffeur. 
Cawley, William F., 85 Rogers St., clerk. 
Chaloux, William L., 88 Bartlett St., manager. 
Champagne, Eusebe, 20 Ivanhoe St., musician. 
Chaput, Philip N., 146 Orleans St., clerk. 
Charron, Edmond J., 109 Grand St., machinist. 
Chase, Harvey J., 435 Lincoln St., iron worker. 
Cheney, Frank P., 25 Raven Road, dealer. 
Chevalier, Edward, 226 Mt. Hope St., clerk. 
Choquette, Jeremie A., 89 Butterfield St., salesman. 
Chouinard, Zenon, 150 Ennell St., clerk. 
Chretien, Henry J., 31 Exeter St., chauffeur. 
Chretien, Joseph A. N., 159 Ludlam St., treasurer. 
Clancy, Arthur F., 73 Campaw St., conductor. 
Clancy, James A., 36 Second St., cashier. 
Clancy, Patrick J., 36 Second St., electrotyper. 
Clancy, Peter., 560 Broadway, tool maker. 
Clark, Avery B., 20 Mansur St., superintendent. 
Clark, James C, 1405 Gorham St., dyer. 
Clark, Joseph M., 35 Oak St., retired. 



LIST OP JURORS 



Clark, Marion S., 316 Pine St., clerk. 
Clark, T. Frank, 35 Oak St., clerk. 
Clarke, John W., 116 Viola St., taxi service. 
Clay, Harry E., 11 White St., second hand. 
Cleary, Walter J., 47 Swift st., carpenter. 
Clee, William, 94 Clark Rd., elevator man. 
Clement, Louis G., 264 Princeton St., dealer. 
Clements, Benjamin W., 29 Troy St., clerk. 
Coakley, John J., 218 Cross st., Saco-Lowell 
Cobban, Donald S., 21 Arcadia Ave., dealer. 
Coffey, James, 148 Sanders Ave., dealer. 
Coffey, Humphrey, 183 Wilder St., clerk. 
Coffey, Timothy J., 148 Sanders Ave., grocer. 
Cogger, William, 438 Riverside St., operator. 
Cognac, Leonce, 153 Avon St., salesman. 
Colburn, Philip E., 93 B St., machinist. 
Colby, Charles A., 174 Pleasant St., machinist. 
Colby, Clayton William, 178 Stevens St., clerk. 
Colby, Walter W., 57 Burtt St., plumber. 
Cole, Fred H., 727 East Merrimack St., foreman. 
Cole, Harry A., 66 Staples St., manager. 
Coleman, Joseph H., 389 High St., painter. 
Collins, Cornelius, 11 Woodward Ave., retired. 
Collins, George D., 62 Royal St., second hand. 
Collins, Thomas J., 69 Glenwood St., foreman. 
Collins, William S., 132 Concord St., electrician. 
Colloty, John F., 15 Huntington St., U. S. C. Co. 
Comerford, Fred S., 32 Nineteenth St., salesman. 
Conaton, Frank P., 88 Pleasant St., clerk. 
Conlon, Edward F., 1 Everett St., truckman. 
Conlon, Martin J., 55 Victoria St., chauffeur. 
Conlon, Matthew C, 41 Concord St., chauffeur. 
Conley, Matthew, 59 Sixth St., conductor. 
Connell, William A., 154 Sixth St., watchman. 
Connolly, John F., 133 Mt. Washington St., clerk. 
Connor, Edward, 48 May St., second hand. 
Connors, Bernard A., 33 Walnut St., U. S. C. Co. 
Connors, Thomas J., rear 138 Cross St., machinist. 
Connors, William H., 168 Pleasant St., chauffeur. 
Conroy, John, 509 East Merrimack St., operative. 
Conroy, Robert F., 151-153 Appleton St., manager. 
Conroy, Thomas, 11 Livermore St., operative. 
Conroy, William F., 51 Lundberg St., picture framer. 
Conroy, Peter, 73 Fletcher St., machinist. 
ConstantineaU, Alexander N., 155 Berry Rd., painter. 
Conway, John E., Jr., 4 Billerica St., clerk. 
Conway, Richard B., 15 Windsor St., clerk. 



LIST OF JURORS 



Coombs, Thomas J., 122 Third St., clerk. 
Cooney, Dennis J., 31 Adams Terrace, retired. 
Cooney, Edward J., 25 Douglas Rd., manager. 
Coote, Samuel J., 25 Liberty St., clerk, 
Copley, Patrick, 560 Broadway, salesman. 
Corbett, Thomas J., 361 Concord St., salesman. 
Cormier, William J., 23 Belrose Ave., real estate. 
Corrigan, James, 5 rear 344 Stackpole St., machinist. 
Corrigan, Michael, 5 rear 344 Stackpole St., laborer. 
Cosgrove, Christopher, 4-32 Pleasant St., laborer. 
Cosgrove, Daniel, 492 Gorham St., auctioneer. 
Cote, Herve E., 69 Eleventh St., tinsmith. 
Cote, Raoul, 56 Whitney Ave., machinist. 
Cotter, C. Edward, 31 Fairgrove Ave., manager. 
Cotter, John A., 69 West Forest St., plumber. 
Cottrell, William H., 11 Viola St., printer. 
Coughlin, James, 400 Stevens St., shoemaker. 
Cover,. Frank G., 48 Tyler Park, dealer. 
Cox, Frank J., 12 Sidney St., printer. 
Cox, Patrick W., 16 Keene St., manager. 
Coyle, James H., 151 Andover St., dealer. 
Coyle, John J., 11 Bourne St., loomfixer. 
Craig, Michael, 24 Swift St., printer. 
Craig, Peter R., 46 Holyrood Ave., superintendent. 
Creegan, James J., 22 Pollard St., laborer. 
Crockett, Harry B., 85 Hastings St., clerk. 
Crosby, Burton H., Ill Moore St., mason. 
Crosby, Sterling B., 20 Light Ave., real estate. 
Crotty, John C, 55 Leverett st., boilermaker. 
Crowe, Frederick M., 180 Broadway, carpenter. 
Crowe, James Robert, 40 Abbott St., laborer. 
Crowe, Martin, 16 Pollard St., shoe worker. 
Crowe, Terrence, 68 Powell St., B. & M. R. R. 
Crowley, Frank J.. 84 Willie St., laborer. 
Crowley, William J., 614 Gorham St., clerk. 
Cryan, Thomas E., 132 Grove St., conductor. 
Crysler, H. Stanley, 258 Gibson St. , manager. 
Cull, Thomas F., 249 East Merrimack St., steamfitter. 
Cummings, John O., 21 Claire St., weaver. 
Cunningham, Clarence, 37 Durant St., steward. 
Cunningham, Frank H., 143 Coburn St., chauffeur 
Cunningham, Fred W., 185 Branch St., shuttle maker. 
Cunningham, Fred Z., 84 Twelfth St., clerk. 
Cunningham, George L., 84 Twelfth St., laborer. 
Cunningham, Henry J., 84 Twelfth St., clerk. 
Curley, Patrick F., 210 West London St., laborer. 
Curtin, Daniel, 30 Saratoga St., operative. 



10 LIST OF JURORS 



Curtin, Joseph P., 514 East Merrimack St., machinist. 
Cushing, Edward T., 36 Prescott St., barber. 
Cusick, James J., 27 Crowley St., clerk. 
Cutting, Lawrence F., 78 Methuen St., clerk. 



D 



Dailey, John C, 317 Westford St., clerk. 
Dailey, John J., 19 North St., operative. 
Daley, Michael J., 29 Agawam St., machinist. 
Dalton, Francis M., 55 Nesmith St., B. & M. R. R. 
Daly, Edward W., 41 Viola St., secretary. 
Daly, William F., 16 Walden St., insurance agent. 
Dana, G. Russell, Jr., 304 Andover St., dealer. 
Dane, Frank H., 23 Arlington St., machinist. 
Danahy, John J., 22 Crowley St., tinsmith. 
Davidson, Thomas, 35 West Ninth St., clerk. 
Davidson, William, 1180 Gorham St., weaver. 
Davis, Charles O., 8 Brickett Ave., Saco-Lowell. 
Davis, Frank W., 14 Hanks St., printer. 
Davis, Percy Emmons, 8 Brickett Ave., Saco-Lowell. 
Dawson, Walter F., 230 E. Merrimack St., clerk. 
Day, James E., 76 South Highland St., agent. 
Dean, James J., 492 Gorham St., meat cutter. 
Dean, Sam, 36 Chatham St., retired. 
Decatur, Herman B., 52 Upham St., salesman. 
Deignan, James A., 284 Stevens St., machinist. 
Delaney, John J., 3 Stanley Ave., chauffeur. 
Delaney, Michael J., 196 Worthen St., operative. 
Delaney, Thomas B., 92 West St., installer. 
Delehanty, William H., 592 Gorham St., laborer. 
Delgren, Nils O., 28 Fay St., polisher. 
Delisle, Cyprien, 14 Wachusett St., barber. 
Demarais, Henry P., 21 Smith St., shipper. 
Dempsey, John H., 318 Central St., retired. 
Denault, Nazaire, 223 Christian St., carpenter. 
Denno, Harold E., 17 Cascade Ave., trainman. 
Derby, Frank W., 11 Cascade Ave., inc. tax assessor. 
DeRoehn, Charles A., 181 Princeton St., painter. 
Dery, Donat, 16 Spaulding St., shoe worker. 
Desaulniers, Oliver L., 104 School St., clerk. 
Descheneaux, Frederick, 767 Moody St., machinist. 
Desilets, Horace, 12 Robert St., operative. 
Desmarais, Edelmard S., 718 Aiken St., dealer. 
Desmond, Daniel A., 19 Wright St., dealer. 



LIST OF JURORS JJ 



Desmond, Frederick H., 195 Stackpole St., clerk. 
Desmond, Robert J., 195 Stackpole St., operative. 
Desrosiers, Edward, 145 Hildreth St., buyer. 
Desrosiers, Joseph A., 92 Colonial Ave., dealer. 
Devine, Michael F., 86 Pleasant St., foreman. 
Devlin, Arthur A., 307 Thorndike St., stage hand. 
Dickson, David, 142 Smith St., dealer. 
Dillon, Thomas, 25 Puffer St., machinist. 
Dilworth, Daniel F., 123 Agawam St., clerk. 
Diman, Lewis B., 32 Waite St., superintendent. 
Dinneen. Michael J., 25 Oliver St., conductor. 
Dodge, Cecil P., 36 Prescott St., reporter. 
Doherty, J. Paul, 147 Pleasant St., asst. adv. mgr. 
Doherty, John J., 14 Hale St., mattress maker. 
Doherty, Michael F., 315 Wentworth Ave., dealer. 
Doherty, William C, 946 Middlesex St., merchant. 
Dolan, James J., 253 Concord St., teller. 
Donahue, Arthur R., 33 Maude St., stripper. 
Donahue, Charles F., 23 Butler Ave., piper. 
Donahue, James H., 45 Coral St., clerk. 
Donnelly, Leo P., 13 Newhall St., manager. 
Donohoe, Michael J., 38 Wannalancit St., salesman. 
Donohoe, Thomas F., 22 Keene St., weaver. 
Donovan, Francis, 20 State St., shipper. 
Donovan, Frank L., 20 State St., U. S. C. Co. 
Donovan, Raymond E., 67 Westford St., draughtsman. 
Doole, George Lee, 108 Stromquist Ave., operative. 
Dooley, William E., 12 Livermore St., clerk. 
Dooley, William H. Jr., 42 Epping St., salesman. 
Doran, George F., 19 Eighth Ave., tool maker. 
Doran, Henry F., 86 Walker St., trimmer. 
Dostaler, Azit R., 105 A St., clerk. 
Douglas, Edmund W., 106 Sanders Ave., contractor. 
Douglas, Ernest, 94 Princeton St., yardman. 
Douglass, John H., 137 Pleasant St., retired. 
Dow, George E., 66 Eighteenth St., salesman. 
Dowd, William F., 513 Lawrence St., proprietor. 
Doyle, George J., 15 Whipple St., barber. 
Doyle, Joseph J., 253 Stackpole St., machinist. 
Doyle, Stephen R., 80 White St., musician. 
Dozois, Hector A., 210 School St., machinist. 
Drapeau, William, 17 Mt. Washington St., contractor. 
Drew, Roscoe T., 1031 Middlesex St., clerk. 
Drinan, George, 7 Webster St., machinist. 
Dudley, William J., 12 Pihl St., metal worker. 
Duffy, Martin E., 1054 Bridge St., cigar maker. 
Duffy, Thomas F., 86 Chestnut St., salesman. 



12 LIST OP JURORS 



Duggan, James J., 730 Lawrence St., operative. 
Duggan, William P., 112 Concord St., clerk. 
Dumas, Allan M., 116 Nesmith St., proprietor. 
Dunlay, Patrick F., 20 Montreal St., truckman. 
Dunlavey, John C, 209 Mt. Vernon St., laborer. 
Dunn, Charles W., 46 Butman Rd., clerk. 
Dunn, James J., 64 Blossom St., stone cutter. 
Durkin, Richard M., 43 Leverett St., driver. 
Duval, Alfred, 802 Moody St., machinist. 
Dwyer, James A., 312 Thorndike St., salesman. 
Dwyer, Timothy J., 580 Gorham St., laborer. 



E 



Eastham, William J., 351 Rogers St., clerk. 
Egan, Thomas E., 93 Nelson Ave., clerk. 
Ela, Lester H., 409 Walker St., clerk. 
Emerson, Charles H., 371 Lincoln St., molder. 
Emmott, Walter H., 561 Westford St., manager. 
Englund, Torstan G., 116 Gibson Road, loomfixer. 
Enwright, Frederick G., 227 School St., clerk. 
Estabrook, Howard M., 22 Seventh Ave., meat cutter. 
Estes, Fred A., 715 Westford St., appraiser. 
Evans, James A., 95 Tyler Park, Page Catering Co. 



F 



Fahey, William J., 836 Chelmford St., plumber. 
Fairgrieve, John H., 33 Grace St., proprietor. 
Farley, Harry P., 28 Warwick St., bottler. 
Farley, Lawrence J., 14 Bryant St., foreman. 
Farrell, John J., 371 Bridge St., operative. 
Farrell, Philip F., 420 Braodway, truckman. 
Farrell, Samuel T., 358 Wentworth Ave., salesman. 
Farrell, Thomas F., 52 West Fourth St., stage hand. 
Farrell, William F., 291 Appleton St., plumber. 
Farrington, John C, 93 Holyrood Ave., manager. 
Farrington, Paul F., 108 Corbett St., bookkeeper. 
Favreau, Alberic Joseph, 989 Lakeview Ave., electrician. 
Favreault, William A., 360 Varnum Ave., clerk. 



LIST OF JURORS 13 



Fecteau, Alexis F., 740 Merrimack St., clerk. 
Fee, Thomas F., 199 Stackpole St., tailor. 
Feeney. Bernard J., 533 Lawrence St., clerk. 
Fels, Max W., 26 Mort Ave., clerk. 
Fernald, George A., 28 Eighteenth St., overseer. 
Fessenden, Henry F., 216 Wentworth Ave., insurance. 
Fidler, Cyrus, 349 Beacon St., merchant. 
Fielding, Joseph E., 637 Chelmsford St., merchant. 
Fife, James, 46 Merrill St., machinist. 
Finnegan, Frank J., 162 Pine St., collector. 
Finnerty, Joseph F., 303 Concord St., clerk. 
Fitzgerald, James, 13 Willie St., laborer. 
Fitzgerald, P. Frank, 1121 Lawrence St., shipper. 
Fitzgerald, Patrick J., 643 Broadway, packer. 
Fitzgerald, Thomas A., 1123 Lawrence St., dentist. 
Fitzgerald, Thomas J., 55 Grove St., dealer. 
Fitzpatrick, Charles J., 52 Fay St., fireman B. & M. 
Flanagan, Edward C, 24 Walnut St., clerk. 
Flanagan, Francis, 24 Walnut St., salesman. 
Flanagan, Patrick M., 93 Fort Hill Ave., laborer. 
Flanagan, Thomas F., 26 A. St., U. S. C. Co. 
Flanigan, Ed., 561 Central St., moulder. 
Flannery, John J., 19 Lombard St., clerk. 
Flemings, James F., 42 Stafford Road, asst. mgr. 
Flint, Lloyd E., 14 Ellingsburg St., teamster. 
Flood, George J., 49 Madison St., shipper. 
Flood, James H., 118 Bartlett St., dealer. 
Flood, John, 27 Newhall St., laborer. 
Flood, Peter F., 23 Bassett St., laborer. 
Flynn, Charles F., 16 Newhall St., overseer. 
Flynn, Eugene, 160 Agawam St., second hand. 
Flynn, Frederick F., 192 School St., chauffeur. 
Flynn, James E., 997 Central St., leather worker. 
Flynn, John O., 126 Chapel St., clerk. 
Fogarty, William J., 114 Grand St., manager. 
Foisey, Joseph A., 327 Hildreth St., retired. 
Follett, Stephen W., 756 Westford St., hotel manager. 
Fontaine, Emery, 176 Avon St., operative. 
Fontaine, Peter W., 359 Mammoth Rd., dealer. 
Forgays, Harold J., 52 Highland St., salesman. 
Forest, Charles M., 30 Sanders Ave., lumber dealer. 
Forrest, Telesphore, 859 Lawrence St., tannery. 
Fortier, Joseph M. G., 12 Gershom Ave., watchmaker. 
Foss, Charles E., 24 Fairmount St., general manager. 
Foster, Alfred G., 33 Troy St., insurance. 
Fox, Russell M., 359 Beacon St., instructor. 
French, Vernon A., 334 Mammoth Rd., auto livery. 



14 LIST OF JURORS 



Frost, Charles E., 285 Princeton St., checker. 
Frye, Austin A., 105 Eighteenth St., druggist. 
Fuller, George B., 41 Grove St., lumber man. 
Fury, Thomas F., 45 West 5th St., operator. 



G 



Gagnon, Joseph A., 67 Mt. Hope St., dealer. 
Gale, George Henry, 64 Lane St., loomfixer. 
Gallagher, Charles J., 4 rear 83 Lakeview Ave., barber. 
Gallagher, George, 569 Concord St., track layer. 
Gallagher, Hugh F., 305 Fairmount St., operative. 
Gallagher, James A,, 117 Methuen St., electrician. 
Gallagher, James F., 27 Madison St., steamfitter. 
Gallagher, James J., 168 Cumberland Rd., dealer. 
Gallagher, John M., 136 Chapel St., cashier. 
Gallagher, John P., 205 Church St., laborer. 
Gallagher, Patrick J., 136 Chapel St., operative. 
Gallagher, Thomas F., 43 Abbott St., operativee. 
Galley, Arthur C, 17 Winthrop Ave., draughtsman. 
Galley, John E., 36 B St., carpenter. 
Galvin, Patrick A., 168 Lawrence St., clerk. 
Galvin, William E., 4 Eagan's Court, elevator man. 
Galvin, William H., 535 Lawrence St., fireman. 
Gardner, Carlton P., 32 Princeton St., clerk. 
Gardner, John J., 795 Bridge St., merchant. 
Gargan, Frank, 4 Viles Ave., operative. 
Garland, Arthur W., 27 So. Loring St., railroad clerk. 
Garrity, Thomas, 445 Chelmsford St., clerk. 
Garrity, Francis, 73 Fletcher St., clerk. 
Garvey, Leo Paul, 66 Grand St., chauffeur. 
Gaudette, Arthur, 125 Dalton St., dealer. 
Gaudette, George, 1117 Middlesex St., teamster. 
Gaudette, Octave, 44 So. Loring St., confectioner. 
Gaudreau, Absalom E., 267 Pawtucket St., operative. 
Gendreau, Flavien N., 200 Circuit Ave., tannery. 
Genereux, Hildege, 78 Aiken St., clerk. 
Genest, Arthur, 475 Varnum Ave., contractor. 
Gerow, William A., 17 Waterford St., dealer. 
Gorvais, Oscar Joseph, 67 Exeter St., letter carrier. 
Gilchrist, Archibald, 32 Bellevue St., Saco-Lowell. 
Gildee, James B., 35 Oak St., clerk. 
Gilfillan, John H., 76 West Fourth St., painter. 
Gill, William F., 725 Lawrence St., leather worker. 
Gilligan, John A., 130 Bowers St., manager. 



LIST OF JURORS 15 



Gilligan, William L., 130 Bowers St., clerk. 
Gillis, Frederick J., 58 Pleasant St., clerk. 
Gilman, Albert I., 20 East Pine St., foreman. 
Gilroy, Frank A., 40 Middlesex St., printer. 
Giroux, Frederick, 25 James St., machinist. 
Gleason, Daniel A., 29 Third St., teamster. 
Gleason, Frederick T., 29 Starbird St., brakeman. 
Gleason, John N., 15 Fernald St., machinist. 
Godet, John R., 491 Lawrence St., manager. 
Golden, Frank P., 43 Wamesit St., clerk. 
Golden, John F., 8 Butterfield St., clerk. 
Goodwin, William B., Ill Chestnut St., organist. 
Gookin, John F., 56 Pleasant St., foreman. 
Gookin, John J., 15 Aberdeen St., manager. 
Gordon, George W., 61 Loring St., carpenter. 
Gorman, James E., 566 Westford St., shoe dealer. 
Gorman, John T., 94 High St., teamster. 
Gormley, Edward F., 31 Washington St., clerk. 
Gormley, Joseph H., 11 Lyon St., insurance. 
Gormley, Joseph H. C., 57 Chestnut st., dyer. 
Gott, Paul M., 605 Bridge St., butcher. 
Graham, Melvin E., 30 Myrtle St., chauffeur. 
Grandchamp, Philippe, 3 Dane St. Ave., machinist. 
Grant, Richard J., 31 Chelmsford St., dealer. 
Graves, Harrison P., 270 Varnum Ave., architect. 
Gray, John J., 236 Plain St., real estate agent. 
Green, John J., 86 High St., laborer. 
Green, Michael, 9 Kinsman St., crossing tender. 
Green, Ralph W., 23 A St., dyer. 
Green, William Wallace, 57 Harland Ave., conductor. 
Greenwood, William S., 461 High St., overseer. 
Gregory, Albion E., 43 Burtt St., superintendent. 
Gregoire, Edward, 86 Ottawa St., insurance agent. 
Grenier, Arthur Joseph, 9 Bowers St., chauffeur. 
Griffin, Ernest L., 1417 Gorham St., carpenter. 
Griffin, William J., 73 Fletcher St., retired. 
Guilbeault, Albert, 28 Roberts St., operative. 
Guimond, Adelard, 1847 Middlesex St., brakeman. 
Guthrie, Patrick J., 21 Robinson St., laborer. 



H 



Hackett, David J., 50 Butman Rd., insurance. 
Haggart, Daniel L., 60 Bartlett St., mule spinner. 
Haggerty, Francis J., 486 E. Merrimack St., asst. paymaster. 



16 LIST OF JURORS 



Haggerty, Michael, 53 A St., blacksmith. 

Haley, Edward M., 64 Otis St., clerk. 

Hall, Fred C, 110 So. Loring St., chauffeur. 

Hall, George, 55 Lamb St., clerk. 

Hallowood, William D., 207 Concord St., shipper. 

Hamel, Alfred, 100 Shaw St., checker. 

Hanahan, Frederick C, 15 Phebe Ave., machinist. 

Handley, Edward J., 279 Appleton St., clerk. 

Handley, John H., 7 Merrill St., painter. 

Handley, John M., 15 Woodward Ave., insurance. 

Hansbury, John J., 169 High St., painter. 

Hanson, Horace R., 1073 Middlesex St., Saco-Lowell. 

Hardy, Ora W., 30 Chauncey Ave., cotton classer. 

Harley, Philip, 46 Crosby St., operator. 

Harrigan, William H., 38 So. Walker St., collector. 

Harrington, Charles D., 211 Christian St., reporter. 

Harrington, J. Russell, 11 Doane St., accountant. 

Harriman, John, 517 Chelmsford St., overseer. 

Harrington, Michael, 47 Warnock St., gate tender. 

Harrington, Patrick, 66 Sixth Ave., machinist. 

Harrington, William C, 15 By St., plumber. 

Harris, Charles F., 359 Walker St., dentist. 

Harrison, Clifton B., 18 Bellevue St., machinist. 

Harrison, Fred, 48 Florence Ave., overseer. 

Harrison, Joseph W., 566 School St., overseer. 

Hart, Dana K., 18 Webster Ave., clerk. 

Hart, John W., 55 Starbird St., moulder. 

Hartigan, John J., 9 Whipple St., leather worker. 

Hartley, Francis S.,^49 Keene St., machinist. 

Hartley, William G., 61 Hoyt Ave., electrician. 

Harvey, Joseph, 843 Moody St., master plumber. 

Hastings, Clifton L., 18 Royal St., driver. 

Hatch, Arthur E., 494 Westford St., treasurer. 

Hayes, Michael F., 6 Griffin St., laborer. 

Healey, Harry W., 29 Huntington St., real estate. 

Healey, James H., 83 Temple St., laborer. 

Healey, John, 30 Mansur St., tailor. 

Hear**, James, 9 Harris Ave., watchman. 

Heap, George Albert, 10 Runels Place, operative. 

Heatherman, James R., 306 School St., fireman. 

Hebert, Elzear R., 772 Moody St., clerk. 

Heenan, Arnold J., 173 Stackpole St., candy maker. 

Hemman, Richard C, 245 Stevens St., retired. 

Henley, James F., 11 Carter St., baker. 

Henry, Daniel P., 116 Fort Hill Ave., truckman. 

Herrick, Joseph S., 46 Pentucket Ave., salesman. 

Hessian, Thomas F., 30 Chippewa St., machinist. 



LIST OF JURORS 17 

Hetu, Hermisdas, 12 Dane Ave., second hand. 
Hey, William, 26 Mill St., molder. 
Hibbs, John J., 286 Branch St., B. & M. R.R. 
Hickey, Cornelius, 10 Walnut St., laborer. 
Hickey, Patrick, 24 Cedar St., driver. 
Higgins, George T., 43 Starbird St., retired. 
Higgins, John J., 135 Andrews St., undertaker. 
Higgins, Joseph J., 125 Mt. Washington St., grocer. 
Higgins, William F., 58 Lyon St., piper. 
Higgins, William F., 51 Abbott St., undertaker. 
Higgins, Terrence J., 200 Pleasant St,, clerk. 
Hill, James G., 24 Myrtle St., painter. 
Hill, Leslie G., 299 Hildreth St., machinist. 
Hinckley, Daniel W., 42 B St., auto dealer. 
Hird, David, 12 Blodgett St., overseer. 
Hird, James A., 17 West Forrest St., chemist. 
Hoar, Martin J., 31 London St., folder. 
Hoar, Michael H., 172 School St., insurance. 
Hobden, George T., 42 Ellis Ave., machinist. 
Hogan, James A., 36 Cosgrove St., provisions. 
Holden, Charles D., 199 Wilder St., clerk. 
Holgate, Benjamin, 97 Grove St., agent. 
Holland, Walter H., 32 Pine Hill St., clerk. 
Holmes, George H., 236 White St., clerk. 
Holmes, Percy, 990 Lakeview Ave., wool sorter. 
Horan, Thomas, 171 Chapel St., elevator man. 
Horgan, John J., 29 Ellsworth St., checker. 
Home, Herbert W., 73 Marlborough St., dealer. 
Hosmer, Cecil N., 147 Andrews St., clerk. 
Houde, Theotime, 27 Sarah Ave., clerk. 
Howes, George E., 131 Varnum Ave., salesman. 
Hubin, Frank J., 135 Third St., insurance agent. 
Hubin, Thomas P., 25 Bunker Hill Ave., driver. 
Hughes, Joseph, 132 Chapel St., laborer. 
Hurd, Robert. 43 Methuen St., driver. 
Hurley, Bernard J., 73 Fourth St., laborer. 
Hurley, James F., 782 Moody St., machinist. 
Hurley, Thomas F., 73 Fourth St., operative. ' 
Hyde, Daniel, 42 Humphrey St., machinist . 
Hylan, Edwin J., 50 Standish St., treasurer. 
Hylan, John B., 28 Nesmith St., gentleman. 



Ineson, William H., 1 Hampshire St., loom fixer. 
Ingham, Benjamin William, 89 Fourth St., fixer. 



LIST OF JURORS 



Inglis, Thomas F., 102 Beech St., foreman. 
Irish, Alanson E., 425 East Merrimack St., clerk. 
Irvine, W. Blake, 49 Livingston Ave., manager. 
Isherwood, Arthur J., 8 Newbury St., jeweler. 



Jackson, John S., 120 Gates St., clerk. 
Jenkins, Edgar, 119 Gates St., machinist. 
Jennings, Joseph, 859 Lawrence St., retired. 
Jennings, Joseph C, 33 South Whipple St., dealer. 
Jenson, Otto, 23 Webber St., receiver. 
Jodoin, Augustus J., 28 Campaw St., operative. 
Jodoin, Ephraim, 386 Fletcher St., painter. 
Johnson, Thomas J., 183 Wilder St., manager. 
Johnston, Richard H., 828 Bridge St., insurance. 
Johnston, Robert J., 1 West View St., clerk. 
Johnston, Thomas H., 717 Bridge St., pattern maker. 
Jones, Harry, 84 South Whipple St., operative. 
Jordan, John J., 16 Chase St., welder. 
Jordan, Lawrence R., 125 Gates St., clerk. 
Joyce, Michael, 74 First St., watchman. 



K 



Keables, Nelson D., 14 Hoyt Ave., machinist. 

Keddie, George, 40 London St., roll coverer. 

Keefe, James T., 640 Andover St., clerk. 

Keefe, Michael A., 200 Cross St., chauffeur. 

Keenan, William F., 15 Otis St., Bleachery. 

Kelleher, Michael, 111 Agawam St., driver. 

Kelleher, William P., 30 Hoyt Ave., electrical contractor 

Kelley, Edward L. ,736 Central St., mechanic. 

Kelley, Edward L. V., 37 Alder St., machinist. 

Kelley, Frank A., 417 Middlesex St., salesman. 

Kelley, Herbert G., 51 Fay St., inspector. 

Kelley, John, 147 Coburn St., bricklayer. 

Kelley, Terrance, 540 Lawrence St., laborer. 

Kelley, William F., 580 Gorham St., clerk. 

Kelley, William J., 75 Hampshire St., B. & M. Shops. 

Keniston, Herbert C, 37 Glenwood St., clerk. 

Kenney, Frank, 207 West 6th St., helper. 



LIST OF JURORS \$ 



Kenney, Patrick Joseph, 30 Plummer Ave., fixer. 

Kenney, Robert F., 1 West View St., clerk. 

Kershaw, Wilfred, 41 Aberdeen St., musician. 

Kew, Loring R., 55 Parkview Ave., dealer. 

Kierce, George W., 71 Fort Hill Ave., inspector. 

Kiernan, Patrick W. 105 Hoyt Ave., agent. 

Kiggins, John R., 179 Meadowcroft St., groundman. 

Kilkenney, John H., 18 Cedar St., laborer. 

Killeen, John P., 60 Willow St., real estate. 

King, Frank V., 4 Astor St., machinist. 

King, George A., 4 Astor St., manager. 

King, John H., 22 Walnut St., draughtsman. 

King, Walter F., 205 Stackpole St., clerk. 

Kinghorn, David B., 33 West Meadow Rd., clerk. 

Kirane, James H., 26 Kinsman St., leather worker. 

Kirane, John H., 32 Crosby St., clerk. 

Kirwin, John W., 416 Wilder St., nickel plater. 

Kirwin, Thomas J., 10 rear 272 Appleton St., operative. 

Knapp, Fred L., 76 Florence ave., clerk. 

Knapp, O. Linwood, 28 Rutland St., salesman. 

Knapp, Walter E., 352 Wilder St., dentist. 

Knopf, Joshua S., 16 Davenport Terrace, B. & M. R. R. 

Knowlton, Harry W., 24, Monadnock Ave., draftsman. 



Labrie, Eugene, 772 Merrimack St., manager. 
Laflamme, Gerdia J., 571 Chelmsford St., clerk. 
Lafontaine, Napoleon, 342 W. Sixth St., Lawrence Mfg. Co. 
Laidlaw, Carl B., 36 Howard St., draftsman. 
Lajoie, Ovila, 722 Merrimack St., dealer. 
Lalime, Charles E., 639 Chelmsford St., overseer. 
Lambert, Maurice J., Jr., 980 Middlesex St., dealer. 
Lamberton, John A., 114 So. Loring St., editor. 
Lamoureux, Anselme, 226 Riverside St., tailor. 
Landers, Charles J., 27 Wamesit St., printer. 
Landry, Arthur Ernest, 798 Moody St., clerk. 
Landry, Henry, 799 Moody St., clerk. 
Langdell, Clarence A., 19 Belmont St., retired. 
Langell, Wallace, 23 Farmland Rd., cabinet maker. 
Lannan, William M., 52 Aiken Ave., clerk. 
Larivee, John B., 118 Boynton St., conductor. 
Larochelle, Hector G., 753 Moody St., mechanic. 
Larock, John, 38 Starbird St., machinist. 
Larose, Alfred, 37 Clark St., clerk. 



20 LIST OF JURORS 



Laurin, Carl G., 40 Lundberg St., stone cutter. 

Lavallee, Rosario, 157 Gershom Ave., jeweler. 

Lawton, Frederick J., 131 Fletcher St., laborer. 

Leary, Dennis F., 339 Lincoln St., real estate dealer. 

Leathers, Charles J., 281 Princeton St., manager. 

LeBoeuf, Albani, 15 Varney St., foreman. 

LeBoeuf, Sylvia A., 16 Wiggin St., bobbin shop. 

Lebrun, Louis, 243 Appieton St., clerk. 

Lecam, Joseph H., 13 Cosgrove St., clerk. 

Leclair, Leo J., 10 Webster Ave., clerk. 

Lee, John J., 82 Butman Rd., salesman. 

Lee, Michael A., 64 Bartlett St., carpenter. 

Lee, Robert J., 55 Laurel St., machinist. 

Lee, Thomas F., 573 Broadway, machinist. 

Lees, Thomas, 14 Dundee St., insurance agent. 

Legare, Joseph A., 46 Mt. Washington St., Heinze Elec. Co. 

L'Heureux, Harvey, 40 Lincoln St., machinist. 

Leith, Alfred F., 17 June St., engineer. 

Leith, Joseph E., 50 Rea St„ clerk. 

Lepperd, Frank E., 30 Pleasant St., steamfitter. 

L'Esperance, Walter J., 30 Dutton St., clerk. 

Leveille, Arthur, 122 Mt. Washington St., clerk. 

Lewis, John T., 43 Fifth St., clerk. 

Lindquist, Chester O., 726 Stevens St., line assigner. 

Lindquist, William F., 11 Rockingham St., machinist. 

Lindsay, John R., 126 Powell St., clerk. 

Livingston, Cornelius, 202 Gibson St., paymaster. 

Lochran, Arthur E., 210 High St., machinist. 

Logan, Frank M., 67 West Fourth St. merchant. 

Lomas, Harry, 23 South Canton St., B. & M. Car Shops. 

Looney, William H., 2 Rockdale Ave., musician. 

Loranger, Edmond. 229 Stackpole St., clerk. 

Lord, John W., 55 Lundberg St., asst. foreman. 

Lull, George E., 11 Nesmith St., merchant. 

Lussier, George H., 903 Moody St., operative. 

Lussier, William O., 236 Ludlam St., machinist. 

Lyle, James E., 127 Parkview Ave., jeweler. 

Lynch, Cornelius P., 374 High St., electrician. 

Lynch, Frank R., 87 Fort Hill Ave., chauffeur. 

Lynch, Patrick, 82 Canton St., barber. 

Lynch, Thomas J., 10 Wedge St., U. S. Navy, retired. 

Lynch, Timothy F., 125 Andrews St., driver. 

Lynch, Walter J., 31 Apple St., horn tester. 

Lyons, Maurice Timothy, 41 St. James St., operative. 

Lyons, Richard, 48 Prospect St., foreman. 



LIST OP JURORS 21 

M 



MacDougall, Harry A., 169 Meadowcroft St., musician. 

MacKenzie, Charles Stanwood, 40 Ruth St., real estate 

Mack, John F., 364 East Merrimack St., clerk. 

Mack, Michael, 250 Wentworth Ave., insurance. 

Mack, Thomas, 13 Durant St., salesman. 

Madden, John F., 38 Keene St., steamfitter. 

Magras, Joseph, 750 Moody St., clerk. 

Maguire, Joseph H., 99 South Loring St., lineman. 

Maguire, Joseph Henry, 1-77 W. Sixth St., manager. 

Maguire, Martin H., 6 East Bleachery St., U. S. C. Co. 

Maguire, Thomas F., 251 Christian St., N. E. T. & T. Co. 

Mahan, William H., 28 Cambridge St., dealer. 

Maher, Thomas F., 1204 Gorham St., chauffeur 

Mahoney, Daniel J., 29 Third St., laborer. 

Mahoney, J. Joseph, 74 South Whipple St., barber. 

Mahoney, Thomas, Jr., 46 Butterfield St., clerk. 

Mahoney, Walter, 46 Franklin St., merchant. 

Mahoney, Walter, "46 Frnklin St., merchant. 

Mailloux. Alexis, 29 Endicott St., dealer. 

Maloney, John J., 37 Fort Hill Ave., barber. 

Maloney, William, 97 Pleasant St., clerk. 

Maloney, Thomas, 201 Cross St., foreman. 

Maloney, William R., 37 Fort Hill Ave., clerk. 

Malorey, Frank A., 694 School St., stone mason. 

Mann, John J., 7 Bachelder Place, operativ. 

Manning, James A., 46 Whitney Ave., merchant. 

Manseau, Z. Nidal, 101 Westford St., clerk. 

Mansfield, Jefferson R., 166 Pine St., asst. treasurer. 

Marden, Robert F., 34 Clark Rd, real estate. 

Markham, John J., 57 Thayer St., laborer. 

Marks, Moses, 38 Florence Ave., tailor. 

Marsden, Allen, 55 Sixth St., clerk. 

Marshall, Frank S., 21 Viola St., machinist. 

Martell, Hormidas J., 799 Moody St., supt. wire works. 

Martin, Charles D., 28 Wamesit St., operative. 

Martin, John F., 282 High St., clerk. 

Martin, John H., 196 Mt. Pleasant St., merchant. 

Martineau, Henry P., 115 Tucker St., machinist. 

Masse, Elzear, 90 Aiken Ave., painter. 

Masson, Louis, 21 Belle Ave., machinist. 

Mathews, Nathaniel W., Jr., 24 Ware St., printer. 

Matte, Edmond, 36 Sparks St., operator. 

Matte, Jeffrey, 77 Gershom Ave., tinsmith. 

Matthews, Luke, 62 Butman Road, overseer. 



22 LIST OF JURORS 



Mauchan, John F., 38 Pine Hill St., clerk. 
Mayo, Frederick R., 238 E. Merrimack St., letter carrier. 
McAfee, John J., 305 Concord St., clerk. 
McAleer, James, 156 Andover St., laborer. 
McAloon, John B., 50 B St., weaver. 
McAnney, William E., 1214 Gorham St., clerk. 
McBride, John F., 738 Central St., laborer. 
McCabe, John, 236 Suffolk St.,. dye house. 
McCaffrey, Daniel J., 5 James St., door man. 
McCaffrey, Danieel J., 5 James St., door man. 
McCaffrey, John H., 198 Pleasant St., weaver. 
McCann, James E., 28 Bowden St., laborer. 
McCann, John, 416 Rogers St., wool sorter. 
McCann, Luke, 4 Hanks St., manager. 
McCarron, Anthony, 31 Berkeley Ave., laborer. 
McCarthy, Bartholomew, 728 Merrimack St., dresser. 
McCarthy, Daniel F., v 15 Crowley St., brakeman. 
McCarthy, Patrick, 19 Cambridge St., laborer. 
McCarthy, William P., 355 Rogers St., real estate. 
McCarthy, William P. Jr., 35 Oakland St., clerk. 
McColough, Edward J., 174 Crosby St., clerk. 
McCoy, Clarence A., 280 Princeton St., chemist. 
McCreadie, William, 11 Richmond Ave., carpenter. 
McCullough, John, 127 Bellevue St., collector 
McDermott, James S., 60 Corbett St., conductor. 
McDonald, John J., 208 Mt. Hope St., second hand. 
McDonough, George M., 80 Inland St., undertaker. 
McElholm, James F., 53 Crowley St., electrician. 
McFadden, Charles, 7 So. Whipple, Am. Hide & Leather. 
McFadden, James L. 230 High St., Am. Hide & Leather. 
McFadden, John J., 82 Agawam St., leather worker. 
McFarland, J. Henry, 59 Howard St., foreman. 
McGarry, John J., 31 Groves Ave., stationary fireman. 
McGauvran, William H., 118 Mt. Washington St., merchant. 
McGenniss, James, 23 Read St., insurance. 
McGilly, Edward A., 75 Hoyt Ave., clerk. 
McGilly, Patrick, 75 Hoyt Ave., wool sorter. 
McGovern, Frank, 28 Fort Hill Ave., janitor. 
McGovern, James M., 14 Madison St., machinist. 
McGovern, Patrick J., 167 High St., shoemaker. 
McGowan, Hugh, 56 Kinsman St., operative. 
McGowan, John J., 471 Bridge St., laborer. 
McGowan, Patrick H., 110 Pleasant St., lineman. 
McGowan, Phillip, 47 Walnut St., operator. 
McGowan, William H., 110 Pleasant St., operative. 
McGrath, Lawrence, 31, Sargent St., clerk. 
McGrath, Michael J., 46 Main St., driver. 



LIST OP JURORS 23 



McGuire, Daniel, 58 Walnut St., laborer. 
McGuire, James P., 60 Andrews St., clerk. 
McHarg, Walter K., 89 Dover St., accountant. 
McHugh, John T., 355 Lincoln St., linotyper. 
McKenna, John A.. 61 Holyrood Ave., purchasing agent. 
McKenna, George B., 13 Cosgrove St., undertaker. 
McKenzie, Charles T., 140 Methuen, cartridge shop. 
McKeron, John E., 37 Saratoga St., operative. 
McKiernan, John, 145 Chapel St., machinist. 
McKinley, Edward J., 124 Stevens St., income tax assessor. 
McKinley, John, 29 Burtt St., operative. 
McKinnon, Kenneth D., 1175 Lawrence St., clerk. 
McKinnon, Murdock, 179 Princeton St., grocer. 
McLaughlin, Charles E., 16 Dutton St., carpenter. 
McLaughlin, Francis P., 16 Keene St., machinist. 
McLaughlin, James E., 833 Central St., tanner. 
McLaughlin, James P., 230 E. Merrimack St., weaver. 
McLaughlin, John E., 56 Fourth St., steamntter. 
McLaughlin, William P., 16 Keene, auto mechanic. 
McLean, Frank E., 223 Liberty St., editor. 
McMahon, Francis P. Jr.. 380 Broadway, clerk. 
McMahon, Joseph H., 23 Fourth Ave., conductor. 
McMahon, William H., 442 Chelmsford St., steamntter. 
McMeniman, James A., 236 Rogers St., steamfitter. 
McNabb, John H., 108 Pleasant St., laundry. 
McNabb, John J., 39 Fourth Ave., clerk. 
McNamara, Benjamin J., 40 Wright St., clerk. 
McNamara, Patrick, 52 Lane St., clerk. 
McNamee, Arthur L., 128 Hoyt Ave., clerk. 
McNamee, Charles A., 583 Stevens St., chef. 
McNeil, John K., 28 South Walker St., carpenter. 
McNeill, Harry L., 37 West Fifth St., clerk. 
McNulty, Frank B., 99 Eustis Ave., tanner. 
McOsker, George M., 73 Hawthorne St., barber. 
McOsker, James F., 27 Grace St., tool maker. 
McOsker, John J., 12 Andrews St., clerk. 
McPadden, John, 19 Myrtle St., insurance. 
McPadden, John J., 49 Maryland Ave., insurance. 
McPhillips, James, 267 Worthen St., weaver. 
McQuade, Arthur J., 197 Pleasant St., loomfixer. 
McQuade, Hugh B., 7 Harrison St., operative. 
McQuade, John F., 581 Chelmsford St., ins. agent. 
McQuade, Walter H., 83 Aberdeen St., clerk. 
McQuaid, Arthur F., 11 Westchester St., fixer. 
McSorley. John F., 332 Wentworth Ave., dealer. 
McVey, William F., 24 Linden St., clerk. 
McSorley, Richard J., 38 Methuen St., clerk. 



24 LIST OP JURORS 



Meehan, John F., 252 Fletcher St., machinist. 
Meehan, Joseph D., 69 Huntington St., plumber. 
Meehan, Joseph P., 45 Burtt St., clerk. 
Meehan, William F., 85 Kinsman St., machinist. 
Mehan, John P., 26 Cosgrove St., granite cutter. 
Meister, Victor H., 18 Windsor St., clerk. 
Mellen, Patrick, 9 Fort Hill Ave., clerk. 
Mercier, Chester, 78 Gates St., clerk. 
Merrill , Herbert A., 4 Wachusett St., retired. 
Merrill, Herbert C, 157 Nesmith St., chemist. 
Mertrude, Paul Louis, 298 Walker St., engineer. 
Meunier, Frederick T., 193 Fletcher St., clerk. 
Mevis, George B., 234 Varnum Ave., merchant. 
Michaud, Albert J., 113 Varnum Ave., manager. 
Miller, Joseph, 224 Foster St., N. E. T. & T. Co. 
Milliken, Albert D., 24 Belmont St., agent. 
Mills, Charles, 17 Rose Ave., salesman. 
Mills, John H., 17 Rose Ave., retired. 
Minahan, James H., 43 Seventh St., operative. 
Miskell, Leo, 138 Cross St., bank clerk. 
Miskell, Martin J., 288 E. Merrimack St., theatrical. 
Mitchell, William E., 30 Weed St., laborer. 
Moir, John, 342 Mammoth Road, optician. 
Molloy, James J., 18 Marginal St., clerk. 
Molloy, John J., 154 Jewett St., weaver. 
Molloy, William H., 138 Cross St., carpenter. 
Monier, Raoul H., 989 Lakeview Ave., floorwalker. 
Montminy, Joseph F., 723 Moody St., optometrist. 
Moody, Percy H., 89 Eighteenth St., electrician. 
Mooney, John J., 1401 Gorham St., tanner. 
Moreau, Leo J., 45 West St., photographer. 
Morgan, Roy A., 32 Bellevue St., engineer. 
Moriarty, Daniel F., 511 Lawrence St., representative. 
Moriarty, James J., 511 Lawrence St., clerk. 
Morris, Thomas J., 40 Chambers St., clerk. 
Morrison, Harry A., 35 Essex St., lineman. 
Morse, Charles H., 309 Princeton Boulevard, clerk 
Morse, George J., 476 Wilder St., beltmaker. 
Morse, Walter E., 80 Eighteenth St., florist. 
Mulcahy, M. Wilfred, 26 Waverly Ave., dealer. 
Muldoon, James F., 734 School St., machinist. 
Mullane, Daniel J., 163 Agawam St., clerk. 
Mullane, Timothy, 40 Linden St., operative. 
Mullaney, James J., 11 Huntington St., salesman. 
Mullaney, John J., 25 Varney St., plumber. 
Mullen, James L., 123 Lawrence St., weaver. 
Mullen, John, 108 Chapel St., operative. 



LIST OF JURORS 25 



Mulligan, James M., 34 Lyon St., machinist. 

Mulligan, John J., 42 Bartlett St., letter carrier. 

Mullin, J. Eugene, 75 Moore St., insurance. 

Mullin, Leon H., 648 Andover St., clerk. 

Mulno, Harry O., 324 Boylston St., superintendent. 

Mulvey, Walter R., 86 Fulton St., salesman. 

Murkland, Arthur J., 45 Talbot St., treasurer. 

Murray, Frank, 86 Fourth Ave., blacksmith. 

Murray, John, 139 Chapel St., clerk. 

Murray, Justin J., 18 Dempsey Place, salesman. 

Murray, Martin, 30 Cosgrove St., U. S. B. Co. 

Murphy, Edward F., 56 Manchester St., machinist. 

Murphy, James A., 86 Hanks St., overseer. 

Murphy, James A., 35 Potter St., carpenter. 

Murphy, James F., 35 Potter St., laborer. 

Murphy, John Joseph, 25 State St., R. R. 

Murphy, Michael J., 368 Lawrence St., slasher tender. 

Murphy, Philip D., 356 East Merrimack St., retired. 

Murphy, William J., 74 Agawam St., dealer. 



N 



Nealon, James F., 211 Church St., laborer. 
Nealon, John J., 348 Stackpole St., operator. 
NTeild, Bertram. 27 Myrtle St., plumber. 
Neild, Charles T., Jr., 49 Fay St., machinist. 
Nelligan, William, 52 Kinsman St., dealer. 
Nelson, Allen, 34 Columbus Ave., merchant. 
Nelson, William, 728 Lawrence St., insurance agent. 
Nestor, John, 348 Stackpole St., machinist. 
Nestor, Patrick F., 348 Stackpole St., representative. 
Newhall, William F., 1 Clinton Ave., salesman. 
Nichols, George A., 65 Falmouth St., printer. 
Niland, Patrick, 13 Walnut St., mason. 
Noonan, George J., 279 High St., linotype operator 
Noonan, John J., '45 By St., salesman. 
Noonan, Thomas M., 16 Fort Hill Ave., foreman 
Norcross, Nicholas G., 227 Nesmith St., insurance. 
Norwood, Ralph G., 52 Houghton St., clerk. 
Noval, Maurice H., 449 Moody St., barber. 
Nugent, Austin W., 9 Coburn St., teamster. 



26 LIST OP JURORS 

O 



Oates, William, 44 Crawford St., machinist. 
O'Beirne, Thomas, 534 Moody St., operative. 
O'Brien, Daniel J., 90 Parkview Ave., real estate. 
O'Brien, Edward F., 35 E. Merrimack St., butcher. 
O'Brien, Frank 230 East Merrimack St., inspector. 
O'Brien, Frank P., 32 Hudson St., clerk. 
O'Brien, John, 40 Whipple St., machinist. 
O'Brien, John E., 519 Broadway, druggist. 
O'Brien, John F., 975 Central St., stock clerk. 
O'Brien, John J., 300 Concord St., slater. 
O'Brien, Joseph H., 236 Salem St., clerk. 
O'Connell, Daniel J., 171 High St., elevator man. 
O'Connell, John P., 7 Everett St., salesman. 
O'Connell, Martin H., 7 Everett St., clerk. 
O'Connell, William E., 185 Stackpole St., goldsmith. 
O'Connell, William F., 7 Everett St., reporter. 
O'Connell, William T., 188 South St., clerk. 
O'Connor, Frederick F., 124 Hoyt Ave., clerk. 
O'Connor, John A., 124 Hoyt Ave., tanner. 
O'Connor, John J., 24 Fay St., dresser tender. 
O'Dea, James L., 68 Church St., clerk. 
O'Donoghue, Thomas, 259 South St., clerk. 
O'Dwyer, Jeremiah J., 148 Midland St., conductor. 
O'Grady, James Francis, 247 Gorham St., salesman. 
O'Grady, John P., 48 West Sixth St., salesman. 
O'Hagan, Michael, 75 Beech St., operative. 
O'Hearn, Thomas B., 282 Riverside St., contractor. 
O'Hare, James, 90 Crosby St., grinder. 
O'Hare, Thomas Jr., 39 Prospect St., operative. 
O'Heir, Octavian G., 78 Queen St., dealer 
O'Keefe, Frank, 155 Stackpole St., laborer. 
O'Keefe, William F., 496 Concord St., meat cutter. 
O'Keefe, William, 323 Lawrence St., grocer. 
O'Loughlin, Joseph F., 38 Kinsman St., operative. 
O'Loughlin, William, 38 Kinsman St., chauffeur. 
O'Neil, Charles F., 73 Chestnut St., teamster. 
O'Neil, Daniel P., 74 Weed St., shuttlemaker. 
O'Neil, Francis, 9 Whipple St., laborer. 
O'Neil, James J., 29 Crowley St., cashier. 
O'Neil, John J., 23 Cedar St., laborer. 
O'Neil, John J., 57 Tolman Ave., watchman. 
O'Neil, Samuel J., 261 Concord St., dresser. 
O'Rourke, Patrick H., 1017 Central St., painter. 
O'Shea, Frank L., 82 Pleasant St., clerk. 



LIST OF JURORS 27 



O'Shea, Richard H., 82 Pleasant St., salesman. 
O'Sullivan, Timothy F., 195 Cross St., manager. 
O'Sullivan, William J., 195 Cross St., clerk. 
Orrell, Ernest R., 19 Hillside St., section hand. 
Orrell, Frank L., 212 Westford St., foreman. 
Otto, Charles S., 38 Burtt St., minister. 



Paine, Oscar S., 21 Fremont St., mill worker. 

Palmer, Cecil, 239 Wentworth Ave. musician. 

Paradis, Robert C, 164 Third St., reporter. 

Parent Benne 110 Gershom Ave. retired. 

Parent, George J., 112 Gershom Ave., plumber. 

Parent, Philias J., 180 Tremont St., machinist. 

Parthenais, David A., 30 Phillips St., clerk. 

Pascall, Frederick, 58 Carlisle St., machinist. 

Patenaude, Charles S. A., 15 Mt. Vernon St., engraver. 

Patton, Harold L., 1264 Middlesex St., clerk. 

Patten, Henry N., 4 Florence Rd., bookkeeper. 

Pauly, Albert, 225 West London St., clerk. 

Payette, Joseph, 31 Gershom Ave., tailor. 

Payne, John, 181 Stackpole St., dealer. 

Pearson, Emil C, 834 Stevens St., treasurer. 

Pepin, Nelson J., 67 Third Ave., millwright. 

Pepin, William Reid, 442 East Merrimack St., dentist. 

Perkins, Stuart, 75 Howard St., barber. 

Perreault, Arthur C, 571 E. Merrimack St., tanner. 

Perrault, Oscar A., 47 Royal St., clerk. 

Perron, Joseph O., 208 Shaw St., barber. 

Perry, John Jr., 14 Robbins St., bank clerk. 

Perry, Joseph P., 124 A St., R. R. fireman 

Pertes, Hyman, 93 Temple St., tailor. 

Pickering, George L., 37 Butterfield St., carpenter. 

Pierce, Marcus T., 67 Tyler Park, cashier. 

Pinkham, Charles E., 48 Bellevue St., claim adjuster. 

Place, Richard E., 17 Woodward Ave., operative. 

Potter, Fred, 384 Beacon St., printer. 

Potter, Richard, 28 Mort Ave., overseer. 

Powers, Thomas J., 1423 Gorham St., motorman. 

Preston, Richard F., 365 Concord St., dealer. 

Priestly, Harry, 31 Princeton St., salesman. 

Primeau, John, 883 Lakeview Ave., motorman. 

Proctor, Charles S., 187 Hovey St., paper dealer. 



28 LIST OF JURORS 

Q 

Queenan, Eugene C, 36 Litchfield Terrace, clerk. 
Queenan, James J., 271 Concord St., clerk. 
Quigley, John M., 62 Inland St., teamster. 
Quigley, Joseph P., 51 Crawford St., painter. 
Quill, Daniel, 105 Merrill Ave., barber. 
Quinn, Daniel A., 29 Bridge St., electrician. 
Quinn, James A., 95 Weed St., chauffeur. 
Quinn, Leo R., 45 Durant St., clerk. 
Quinn, Patrick John, 11 Brickett Ave., machinist. 
Quinn, Thomas L. F., 34 Weed St., clerk. 
Quinn, Thomas L. F., 34 Week St., clerk. 
Quinn, Timothy, 109 Sherman St., foreman. 
Quirbach, Henry C., 21 Fairfax St., cigar maker. 



R 



Racette, John, 527 Moody St., manufacturer. 
Racicot, Leo, 5 Livermore St., steamfitter. 
Rafferty, William, 201 Middlesex St., insurance. 
Randlett, Harry M., 19 Queen St., fish dealer. 
Raygan, William, 22 Ash St., printer. 
Read, Thomas F., 130 West St., gardener. 
Ready, William B., 10 Bertha St., barber. 
Ready, William J., 13 Fay St., mill operative. 
Reardon, Michael D., 21 Crowley St., clerk. 
Redding, John P., 220 Fletcher St., shoe worker. 
Redding, William, Jr., 82 Read St., clerk. 
Reed, Bird C, 48 Humphrey St., retired. 
Reed, Charles F., 16 Maud St., engineer. 
Regan, John E., 41 Remington St., credit man. 
Regan, Michael, 26 Andover St., laborer. 
Regan, Michael J., 23 Harris Ave., motorman. 
Regan, Joseph D., 57 Butterfielcl St., operative. 
Reid, Warren T., 24 Epping St., B. & M. Shops. 
Reidy, James J., 26 Saratoga St., tanner. 
Reidy, Patrick J., 26 Saratoga St., tanner. 
Reilly, Patrick T., 32 Chapel St., laborer. 
Reinstierna, Torsten, 43 Sidney St., wool sorter. 
Renfrew, Albert J., 272 Merrimack St., chauffeur. 
Reynolds, John C, 139 Chapel St., clerk. 
Reynolds, John L., 624 Chelmsford St., B. & M. R. R. 
Reynolds, William H., 624 Chelmsford St., machinist. 



LIST OF JURORS 29 



Rhodes, Albert A., 151 Summer St., clerk. 

Richards, James P., 18 Walnut St., operative. 

Richards, John J., 18 Walnut St., sheet metal worker. 

Richards, Lyman H., 93 Crawford St., shoe cutter. 

Richardson, Charles F., 112 Jenness St., clerk. 

Richter, Roy C, 217 Smith St., clerk. 

Riley, James F., 22 Ash St., laborer. 

Riley, John J., 41 Blossom St., dealer. 

Riley, John P., 15 Robinson St., bookkeeper. 

Riley, Luke J., 755 Broadway, barber. 

Riley, Patrick, 159 Broadway, machinist. 

Rivet, Francis L., 484 Moody St., dealer. 

Roach, Bernard F., 174 Crosby St., paver. 

Roach, John E., 27 Chapel St., printer. 

Roark, James S., 210 Parker St., plumber. 

Roark, John J., 210 Parker St., clerk. 

Roarke, Lawrence, 55 Fourth St., operative. 

Roarke, Peter J., 365 Lawrence St., laborer. 

Robbins, George L., 339 High St., engineer. 

Roberts, George M., 74 Fay St., laborer. 

Roberts, John J., 147 Meadowcroft St., chauffeur. 

Roberts, Walter R., 74 Fay St., clerk. 

Robertshaw, Henry, 33 Warnock St., attendant. 

Robertson, Abel P., 75 Smith St., retired. 

Robertson, George O., 575 Andover St., salesman. 

Robbins, John F., 246 Salem St., painter. 

Robinson, John W., 80 Clark Rd., manager. 

Roche, Patrick Francis, 121 Moore St., bookkeeper. 

Rogers, Edward J., 779 Central St., manager. 

Rogers, John F., 29 Cedar St., undertaker. 

Romain, Isaac B., 49 Norcross St., machinist. 

Rooney, James H., 238 Pine St., dentist. 

Rooney, John J., 238 Pine St., superintendent. 

Rostler, Samuel, 49 Rutland St., provision dealer. 

Rourke, Bernard F., 477 Parker St., plumber. 

Rourke, Henry L.,'42 Highland St., architect. 

Rourke, James, 120 Chapel St., operative. 

Rourke, John C., 477 Parker St., retired. 

Rourke, Michael, 575 Broadway, undertaker. 

Rousseau, Arthur, 600 Varnum Ave., carpenter. 

Rousseau, Sidney J., 233 Ludlam St., chauffeur. 

Rousseau, Syfroid, 815 Moody St., clerk. 

Roux, J. Arthur, 19 White St., contractor. 

Rowland, Charles T., 5 Belmont St., wholesale grocer. 

Roy, Etienne Timothee, 44 Starbird St., contractor. 

Rugg, Roscoe I., 35 C St., engineer. 

Runels, Chester M., 818 Andover St., struc. engineer. 



30 LIST OP JURORS 



Runels, George H., 240 Gibson St., real estate. 

Russell, John L., 17 Victoria St., manager. 

Rutledge, Robert J., 263 E. Merirmack St., auto salesman. 

Ryan, Edward P., 40 Sycamore St., clerk. 

Ryan, Matthew A., 25 Auburn St., helper . 

Ryan, Michael, 4 Pine Hill St., engineer. 

Ryan, John J., 49 Grove St., clerk. 

Ryan, William, 73 Third St., clerk. 

Rynne, Michael, 444 Central St., clerk. 



Sadlier, Charles P., 70 Cosgrove St., tanner. 

Sadlier, Frederick A., 46 Keene St., clerk. 

Sadlier, George E., 46, Keene St., clerk. 

Sadlier, John A., 46 Keene St., laborer. 

Sadlier, William F., 208 Moore St., N. E. T. & T. Co. 

Salmon, William, 41 Rock St., laborer. ' 

Sarre, Leon E., 842 Varnum Ave., picture framing. 

Saunders, Edward J., 403 Andover St., real estate. 

Saunders, James R., 27 Waugh St., welfare worker. 

Saunders, Thomas A., 325 Mammoth Rd., agent. 

Scanlon, James F., 3 Fourth St., laborer. 

Scanlon, Thomas A., 38 Fremont St., salesman. 

Scannell, Richard J., 11 Shaffer St., insurance. 

Scannell, William J., 46 Rhodora St., boiler maker. 

Scarlott, George, 36 Robbins St., foreman. 

Scott, William Cleveland, 257 Appleton, machinist. 

Scribner, Ernest D., 76 Tyler Park, dealer. 

Scully, Patrick Francis, 54 Pleasant St., loomfixer. 

Secor, Francis H., 22 Rockdale Ave., switchtender. 

Secord, Freeland, 3-49 Wilder St., driver. 

Senter, Arthur H., 238 Cabot St., carpenter. 

Shanley, John J., 50 Otis St., clerk. 

Shanney, William, 35 Smith St., motorman. 

Sharkey, John W., 17 Caddell Ave., salesman. 

Sharkey, Frederick C, 10 Ayer Ave., winder. 

Sharkey, Michael J., 517 School St., real estate daler. 

Shaughnessy, George W.,,197 Hale St., clerk. 

Shaughnessy. John, 303 East Merrimack St., letter carrier, 

Shea, Cornelius, 51 Keene St., U. S. C. Co. 

Shea, Daniel F., 23 Emery St., brakeman. 

Shea, Edward J., 186 Mammoth Road, dealer. 

Shea, William, 24 Prospect St., machinist. 

Sheahan, Thomas A., 1210 Gorham St., grocer. 



LIST OF JURORS 31 



Sheehan, John D., 216 Thorndike St., chauffeur. 

Sheehan, John P., 204 Moore St., machinist. 

Sheehan, Michael J., 105 Andrews St., conductor. 

Sheehy, James, 3 Pleasant St., provision clerk. 

Sheedy, John, 10 Madison St., clerk. 

Sheehy, William, 94 South Whipple St., weaver. 

Sheeley, William W., 228 E. Merrimack St., watchman. 

Shinnick, Michael, 19 Anderson St., foreman. 

Short, Harry W., 152 Dartmouth St., machinist. 

Small, Ivan O., 17 Sanders Ave., cashier. 

Smart, Robert E., 4 rear 121 Willie St., steamfitter. 

Smith, Arthur R., 51 Canton St., wood dealer. 

Smith, Howard D., 669 Westford St., chemist. 

Smith, John D., 195 Mt. Hope St., insurance agent. 

Smith, Philip H., 144 Pleasant St., tanner. 

Smith, Samuel, 6 Burns St., U. S. C.'Co. 

Smith, Thomas M.., 26 Gertrude Ave., clerk. 

Smith, Warren P., 384 Walker St., retired. 

Smith, William B., 87 Humphrey St., chauffeur. 

Smith, William F., 58 Seventh St., machinist. 

Spence, William G., 54 Raven Rd., treasurer. 

Smithson. Angelo L., 5 Myrtle St., overseer. 

Snell, Thomas, 302 Walker St., toolmaker. 

Somerset, Alfred J., 104 Woodward Ave., polisher. 

Southam, Brook, 57 Gates St., overseer. 

Spellissey, John, 35 Butler Ave., laborer. 

Spooner, Frank J., 22 South Walker St., clerk. 

Starr, George S., 144 High St., weaver. 

Stearns, Frank K., 122 Eleventh St., retired. 

Stearns, Wilbur A., 43 Grace St., master mechanic. 

Stevens, Tyler A., 133 Clark Rd., treasurer. 

Stewart, Arthur A., 56 Robbins St., professor. 

Stewart, George A., 301 Beacon St., general mgr. 

Stowell, George F., 35 Sutherland St., barber. 

Strauss, Edward, 510 Chelmsford St., grocer. 

St. Hilaire, Arthur, 19 Mt. Hope St., operative. 

Stickney, Asa, 85 Whitney Ave., clerk. 

Stickney, Charles, 599 Schol St., inventor. 

St. Pierre, Joseph D., 543 Fletcher St., real estate. 

St. Pierre, Francis J., 2 Goward's Place, boilermaker. 

Sturtevant, Earl N., 19 Robbins St., clerk. 

Sullivan, Cornelius F., 17 Ralph St., manager. 

Sullivan, Daniel J., 453 Parker St., conductor. 

Sullivan, Eugene P., 84 Maple St., primer. 

Sullivan, George Douglas, 45 Wamesit St., chauffeur. 

Sullivan, George S., 33 Butterfield St., clerk. 

Sullivan, Henry, 43 Plummer Ave., chauffeur. 



32 LIST OF JURORS 

Sullivan, Henry J., 173 Mt. Vernon St., foreman. 

Sullivan, James, 48 Franklin St., laborer. 

Sullivan, James F., 3 Erown's Block Marshall St., laborer. 

Sullivan, Jeremiah F., 79 Andrews St., driver. 

Sullivan, John J., 44 Keene St., painter. 

Sullivan, Michael E., 85 Pleasant St., barber. 

Sullivan, Michael J., 240 Moore St., butcher. 

Sullivan, Richard EL, 8 Batchelder Place, teamster. 

Sullivan, Russell Paul, 33 Fifth Ave., clerk. 

Sullivan, Thomas A. D., 28 Grove St., dealer. 

Sullivan, Willard D., 39 Loring St., manufacturer. 

Sullivan, William H., 724 Bridge St., fish dealer. 



Tansey, John F., 322 East Merirmack St., trackman. 
Tarrant, Richard H., 27 State St., grocer. 
Taylor, Frank A., 28 Grace St., clerk. 
Taylor, Samuel A., 12 Chase Ave., watchman. 
Teeson, Arthur S., 18 Crowley St., B. & M. R. R. 
Tellier, Alderic, 107 Avon St., salesman. 
Terry, Joseph H., 223 Hildreth St., wool sorter. 
Thereault, Achille, 161 Mt. Vernon St., B. & M. R. R. 
Thibodeau, Rodrigue, 158 Riverside St., dealer. 
Thomas, Edward, 272 Merrimack St., chauffeur. 
Thomas, Robert R., 24 Loring St., foreman. 
Thompson, Arthur R., 21 Loring St., tailor. 
Thompson, Perry D., 185 Andover St., coal dealer. 
Thorpe, James, 100 Riverside St., treasurer Glass Co. 
Thurber, Alexander, 903 Moody St., clerk. 
Thyne, Martin J., 56 Hudson St., laborer. 
Titcomb, Philip, 112 Jackson St., teller. 
Tobin, Joseph F., 62 Twelfth St., machinist. 
Tobin, Patrick, 78 Whipple St., operative. 
Tobin, Richard N., 28 Dutton St., machinist. 
Tobin, William H., 84 School St., clerk. 
Townsend, Fred J., 14 Somerset St., retired. 
Townsend, Richard J., 47 Swift St., dresser. 



LIST OF JURORS 33 

Trask, William H., 28 Manchester St., bookkeeper. 
Travis, Walter F., 58 Seventh St., foreman. 
Trepanier, J. Edmond, 11 Willie Ave., piper. 
Trudeau, Hervey, 5 rear 768 Lakeview Ave., barber. 
Tucker, J. True, 225 Foster St., retired. 
Tully, John J., 44 D St., clerk. 
Turcotte, Oswald, 523 Fletcher St., baker. 
Turgeon, Pheleppe, 50 Chestnut St., machinist. 
Turner, Amos S., 119 Pleasant St., painter. 
Tuttle, Howard W., 44 Oakland St., chauffeur. 
Tyler, George A., 64 Varnum St., ball player. 
Twohey, Edward, 14 Madison St., contractor. 
Tuttle, Joseph T., 302 Salem St., painter. 



Vallely, Frederick A., 45 Whipple St., driver. 
Vallerand, Ernest J., 746 Moody St., machinist. 
Vanasse, Francois I., 213 White St., operative. 
Van Hise, Albert, 46 Bellevue St., pattern maker. 
Vaughn, Thomas F., 11 Fay St., asst, foreman. 
Vigeant, Leon O., 48 Riverside St., clerk. 



W 



Wadleigh, Jude C, 305 Andover St., agent. 
Wagner, George F., 42 Marlborough St., treasurer. 
Walker, Daniel H., 144 Hanks St., contractor. 
Walker, George H., 153 Winthrop Ave., clerk. 
Walker, Thomas C., 80 Chestnut St., druggist. 
Walsh, Charles E., 75 Harris Ave., broker. 
Walsh, James Joseph, 68 Willow St., operator. 
Walsh, John, 152 Concord St., printer. 
Walsh, John F., 70 Maryland Ave., manager. 
Walsh, William A., 73 Fletcher St., clerk. 
Walter, Fred H., 40 Lura St., merchant. 
Wamsley, John, 666 School St., clerk. 



34 LIST OF JURORS 

Ward, Leo P., 109 Blossom St., electrician. 

Ward, Timothy J., 22 Fairgrove Ave., proprietor. 

Ware, Alfred D., 116 Central St., tailor. 

Ware, Charles P., 232 Westford St., tailor. 

Ware, Harry R., 60 Harris Ave., auto salesman. 

Warnock, Frank A., 13 Wamesit St., plasterer. 

Warren, Patrick T., 598 Gorham St., clerk. 

Waters, Daniel J., 38 Liberty St., laborer. 

Watson, Alfred, 15 Norcross St., retired. 

Watson, Henry L., 84 Rolfe St., printer. 

Watson, Peter, Jr., 84 Rolfe St., printer. 

Weaver, Alvah H., 479 Westford St., roofer. 

Webster, Orrin H,, 251 Foster St., asst. supt. 

Welch, Andrew J., 317 Bridge St., laborer. 

Welch, Eugene F., 64 Pleasant St., leather worker. 

Welch, Frederick F., 60 Third Ave., cabinet maker. 

Welch, John F., 70 Livingston Ave., plumber. 

Welch, Martin F., 64 Pleasant St., tanner. 

Welch, Richard J., 543 Andover St., plumber. 

Welch, William J., 64 Pleasant St., glazier. 

Wells, George F., 392 East Merrimack St., secretary. 

West, Richard E., 306 Boylston St., superintendent. 

Westwood, John S., 40 Smith St., druggist. 

Whalen, Daniel A., 22 Ash St., clerk. 

Whalen, Thomas A., 37 Church St., grocer. 

White, Clayton E., 51 Osgood St., motorman. ( 

White, Frank P., 940 Central St., tanner. 

White, James A., 154 A St., agent. 

White, Royal P., 29 Monadnock Ave., agent. 

White, William J., 67 Canton St., retired. 

Whittier, Fred C, 56 Eighteenth St., overseer. 

Whitney, Walter, 177 Stackpole St., machinist. 

Whittier, John K., 72 Canton St., agent. 

Wholey, Daniel A., 75 Woodward Ave., insurance. 

Wilcox, Robert, 623 Central St., clerk. 

Widen, Peter, 56 Weed St., machinist. 

Wilde, Raymond T., 724 Chelmsford St., overseer. 

Wilder, Wesley M., 24 Coral St., dealer. 

Wilder, William F., 20 Huntington St., plumber. 



LIST OF JURORS 35 

Willard, Nelson B., 12 Puffer St., salesman. 
Williamson, John T., 300 Wentworth Ave., blacksmith. 
Wilson, Albert, 684 Chelmsford St., foreman. 
Wilson, Thomas J., 57 Midland St., salesman. 
Winn, James R., 160 Andover St., U. S. C. Co. 
Winters, Emmett T., 48 Hastings St., bookkeeper. 
Wolf, Joseph E., 295 Appleton St., manager. 
Wood, Robert B., 175 Dartmouth St., photographer. 
Wood, William E., 101 Livingston Ave., manager. 
Woodward, Edward F., 11 Florence Road, asst. manager. 
Woodward, Warren S., 93 Forrest St., bookkeeper. 
Worsnip, Robert S., 5 Hugh St., spinner. 
Wrenn, Patrick, 173 School St., janitor. 
Wylie, Raymond L., 2 Coburn Place, floor hand. 
Wyman, Alonzo, 60 Fort Hill Ave., machinist. 
Wynne, James H., 362 East Merrimack St., laborer. 



Young, Robert J., 27 Methuen St., clerk. 



Lowell Election Commission. 



J. OMER ALLARD, Chairman. 
THOMAS H. BRADEN, 
FRANK P. McNEIL, 
ANDREW F. ROACH, Secretary. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 



OF THE. 



CITY OF LOWELL 

MASSACHUSETTS 




1925 



4E PHANEUF PRESS n^V-^vyi 375 MOODY STRtEl 



ANNUAL REPORT 



CITY OF LOWELL, Jan. 1, 1926. 

Hon. John J. Donovan, Mayor 

and the City Council of the City of Lowell, 

Loweir, Mass. 

Gentlemen : 

Herewith is transmitted a report of the activities of the Lowell 
Police Department for the administrative year ending December 
31, 1925. 

Respectfully yours, 

HUGH DOWNEY, 

Superintendent of Police. 



ROSTER OF LOWELL POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Superintendent : Hugh Downey. 

Deputy Superintendent : Alexander Duncan. 

Captains: David Petrie, George B. Palmer, Michael Winn. 

Lieutenants: Martin Connors, Patrick J. Frawley, John Free- 
man, iMartin A. Maher, James J. Kennedy, Samuel J. Bigelow, 
Philip Dwyer, Peter McManmon. 

Sergeants : Joseph H. Johnson, Thomas McCloughry, Hugh 
Maguire, Edward J. Connors, Frank L. Maloney, William L. Kee- 
gan, Patrick Sullivan, Charles S. Sharkey. 

Inspector: John A. Walsh. 



Aldrich, Clyde R. 
Bagley, Patrick H. 
Barry, Charles 
Begley, Timothy J. 
Boyle, James 
Brennan, Daniel P. 
Brennan, William J. 
Brosnan, James F. 
Burke, James E. 
Burns, James H. 
Burns, John 
Carey, Francis J. 
Castles, Stephen J. 
Cawley, Peter 
Christo, Anthony 
Clancy, John 
Clark, Anthony 
Clark, John H. 
Clark, Joseph A. 
Clark, Patrick B. 
Conlon, John F. 
Connolly, Michael 
Connolly, Patrick J. 
Considine, James 
Conway, Owen S. 
Conway, William E. J. 
Cooney, Alfred J. 
Cossette, Adelard 
Craig, Patrick J. 
Creamer, Ambrose M. 
Crowley, Robert C. 
Cullen, Jerome P. 
Cushing, Andrew H. 
Deering, Henry E. 
Dillon, Charles 
Doherty, William P. 
Donovan, Daniel C. 
Donovan, Frank J. 
Donovan, John J. 
Dooley, Jeremiah J. 
Drewett, Arthur W. 
Dwyer, Timothy J. 
Fanning, John J. 
Farley, Joseph 
Farris, Henry E. 
Flaherty, Patrick 
Flanagan, Edward F. 
Frechette, Henry J. 
Furey, William J. 
Ganley, John J. 
Garrity, James P. 



PATROLMEN 

Gennell, Charles J. 
Gill, Matthew J. 
Gillis, John 
Goldrick, Hubert 
Graham, John 
Hamilton, Charles A. 
Hartley, Paul J. 
Hayes, Edward 
Healey, John F. 
Hessian, Thomas H. 
Hickey, Michael 
Hill, Edward E. 
Hogan, Daniel J. 
Hunter, Andrew W. 
Huse, John 
Judge, Bernard L. 
Kelley, Arthur M. 
Kelley, John T. 
Kiernan, Michael 
Killoy, Alfred J. 
Killoy, William H. 
Kivlan, Walter L. 
Lamoureux, Joseph L. 
Lane, Daniel W. 
Lane, Simon 
Lapan, Louis W. 
Lee, William G. 
Leahy, John J. 
Leavitt, Patrick F. 
Linane, John J. 
Liston, Edward J. 
Liston, William F. 
Lynch, Daniel M. 
Lynch, John F. 
Maloney, Myles P. 
Markham, James 
Maroney, Thomas H. 
Marshall, Frank K. 
McBride. William F. 
TTcCaU. Frederick O. 
McCann, James E. 
McCann, Matthew J. 
McCloughry, Alex. 
McDonald. Wilfrid J. 
McElroy, Samuel H. 
McGreevey, Thomas H. 
McManus, John J. 
McNulty, John F. 
McNally, James R. 
McNally, John F. 
Mahoney, Timothy J. 



Mahan, John W. 
Moloney, Thomas A. 
Moore, Francis H. 
Morrison, James P. 
Mulry, John T. 
Mulvey, Robert T. 
Murphy, Frank H. 
Murphy, Daniel F. 
Murphy, John E. 
Murphy, John H. 
Murphy, William F. 
Nelson, Thomas J. 
Nelson, William P. 
Nickles, Walter F. 
Noonan, James J. 
Noonan, Patrick F. 
Noye, Jose V. M. 
O'Connell, Michael 
O'Connor, Timothy 
O'Dea, Frank J. 
O'Keefe, Cornelius 
O'Loughlin, FrancisM. 
O'Neil, Michael J. 
O'Sullivan, Thomas P. 
Quinlan, William H. 
Ready, Francis E. 
Reagan, William H. 
Reardon, John 
Riley, Thomas B. 
Riordan, Timothy 
Rourke, Michael 
Ruiter, Ara 
Rynn, Michael F. 
Sayers, John T. 
Scully, John F. 
Shapiro, Morris 
Sheridan, Gilbert W. 
Sherry, Thomas J. 
Spillane, Paul M. 
Sullivan, John J. 
Sullivan, Cornelius F. 
Sullivan, Michael 
Swan wick, John W. 
Tansey, Owen J. 
Trudel, Isadore 
Turner, Louis J. 
Wallace, Charles G. 
Whelan, John T. 
Whitworth, James H. 
Wilson, Wesley A. 
Wilson, William H. 



SUPERNUMERARIES - 



Becht, Oscar C. 
Craig, John F. 
Farrell, Richard A. 
Gilbo, Bernard J. 
Grady, George F. 
Farley, Leo J. 
Brennan, Harry C. 
Haggerty, William T. 
Hickey, Thomas F. 



Hurley, John M. 
Keefe, Edward F. 
Lemoine, Arthur F. 
McCann, James E. Jr. 
McGuire, Charles E. 
McNamee, John J. 
Molloy, Martin A. 
Murphy, James W. 
Murray, John J. 



McNiff, John J. 
Neault, William P. 
Sadlier, Charles P. 
Shannon, Philip 
Sims, Horace G. 
Sullivan, Daniel J. 
Tarsa, Joseph F. 
Thompson, John T. 
Wood, James H. 



EMPLOYEES 

Foreman Signal Sytem : Joseph McDermott. 

Wiremen: Harry A. Morrison, Robert G. Rutherford, Corne- 
lius P. Lynch. 

Operator: James H. Howard. 

Foreman of Garage : Frederick A. Cotter. 

Chauffeur Mechanic : Leo Hoban. 

Chauffeurs : William G. Morse, James Moloney, James J. 
Lennon, Charles C. Brown, Claude R. McElroy, Charles O. Sulli- 
van. 

Stenographer: Lillie S. Cutler. 

Charman : Jeremiah F. Leary. 

Matron : Susan J. Lynch. 

Police Women : Emily Skilton, Matilda J. Costello, Emma V. 
Des Forges. 

The organizatin of the police department for the 3^ear 1925 
was as follows : 

One superintendent, one deputy superintendent, three cap- 
tains, five lieutenants, eight sergeants, one inspector, three police 
women, one hundred fifty one patrolmen, thirty one reserve of- 
ficers, one foreman of signal system, three wire men, one fore- 
man of garage, one chauffeur mechanic, six chauffeurs, one ma- 
tron, one stenographer, one telegraph operator, one charman. 

Population estimated 112,000, area 14.1 square miles. Ac- 
cepted streets 144.08. Unaccepted streets, 73 miles. Appropria- 
tion for year $357,170.45. 



APPOINTMENTS 

The following named were appointed to the reserve force 
during the year 1925 : 

Oct. 31, 1925 John M. Hurley, William T. Haggerty, Harry C. 
IBirennan, Joseph P. Tarsa, John J. Thompson, 
John J. Murray, John F. Craig, John J. McNiff, Leo 
J. Farley, Edward F. Keefe, James W. Murphy. 
The following promotions were made from the regular re- 
serve to the regular force during the year 1925. 
Oct. 24, 1925 Michael Hickey, Anthony Christo, Frank }. 
O'Dea, Myles P. Maloney, Robert T. Mulvey, 
John H. Murphy, James F. Brosnan, Matthew 
J. Gill, John F. Scully, Timothy J. Begley, Wil- 
liam P. Doherty, Louis J. Turner. 
The following promotions were made in 1925 : 
Oct. 31, 1925 Hugh Downey nominated Supt. of Police by the 

Mayor and confirmed by City Council. 
May 29, 1925 Joseph H. Johnson appointed Sergeant of Police. 

REINSTATED 

Sept. 16, 1925 Charles L. Gallagher reinstated as a police of- 
ficer, 

PENSIONED 
May 29, 1925 Philip D. Murphy pensioned. . 

RESIGNED 

Nov. 25, 1925 Peter Tsaffaras resigned. 

APPOINTED 

Feb 25, 1925 Augustus W. iBrosnan appointed chauffeur. Died 

May 30, 1925. 
Aug. 7, 1925 Charles O. Sullivan appointed chauffeur. 

NECROLOGY 

July 28, ,1925, Thomas R. Atkinson, Supt. of Police died. Dec. 25, 
1867, born in New Brunswick. May 15, 1894, en- . 
tered the service. May 14, 1895, promoted to 
regular. June 1, 1902, detailed as warrant offi- 
cer. Feb. 15, 1906, detailed Acting Sergeant of 
police. Sept. 22, 1908, promoted to Sergeant. 
March 22, 1910, promoted to Captain of police. 
Aug. 18, 1921 in charge of criminal investiga- 
tion Bureau. Ma v 27, 1922, appointed Supt. of 
Police by Mavor and confirmed by City Council. 



5TATI5TICAL REPORT 

OF THE 

LOWELL POLICE DEPARTMENT 

JANUARY 1, 1925 TO DECEMBER 31, 1925 



RECORD OF ARRESTS AGAINST PUBLIC ORDER, 1925 



Offence 



TOTAL 206 333 3 



Adultery 

Amusements, unlicensed 

Auto Law, violating .... 

Bastardy , 

Being present where ga 
ming implements found 

Being present at a game 
on Lord's Day 

Breaking Glass in Public 
Street 

Capias 

Carrying Weapons 

City Ordinance, violating 

Common Carrier, unlic. . . 

Contempt of Court 

Cruelty to Animals 

Deserter 

Delinquent 

Disturbing the Peace .... 

Dog, keeping unlicensed 

Drunkenness 

Escaped from Prison .... 

False alarm of ringing . . 

Fish and Game Law, vio. 

Fornication 

idle and Disorderly 

Incest 

Indecent Exposure 

Insane 

Keeping Disorderly House 

Labor Law, violation of . . 

Lewd Cohabitation 

Lewdness 

Lewd Publication 

Liquor Laws, violation of 

Non Support 

Neglected Children 

Open Shop on Lord's Day, 

keeping 

Opium Law, violation of 
Park Rules, violating .... 
Permitting Gaming Appa- 
ratus on Premises .... 
Postal Laws, violating . . . 
Pool Room, unlicensed . . 
Playing Game on Lord's 

Day 

Profanity 

Pure Food Law, violating 

Railer and Brawler 

Safe Keeping 

Stubbornness 

Support from Acts of 

Prostitution 

Suspicious Person 

Truancy 

Vagrants 

Vio., Weights & Measures 

Law 

Volstead Act, violation of 



11 



14 



1 

3 

1 

184 



13 
9 

201 



200 



2 


9 


10 


13 




1 


1 




10 


12 




2 


1 


2 



16 



229 

1 

3 

5 



36 



193 

2 

5 

5 



36 



14 



169 

] 

2 
1 



1 

156 

3 

2 

1 
1 



144 
2 



10 



336 3831383 461 526l392l343 334 



40 
1 

539 

32 

48 
137 

1 
83 
15 

2 
2 
1 

6 

3 

58 

70 

2 

2186 

15 

2 

13 

27 

1 

1 

2 

5 

4 

7 

6 

12 

1 

485 

208 

31 

1 
6 
3 

9 
1 

1 

3 

1 
20 

1 

129 

14 

1 
88 
10 
12 

2 
16 



278 4364 



RECORD OF ARRESTS AGAINST THE PERSON, 1925 



Offence 



Assault and battery 
Assault on police officer 

Assault, Felonious 

Assault with a knife 

Manslaughter 

Murder 

Rape 

Rape, Attempted 

Robbery 

Threats 

TOTAL 



s 

1-9 




3 


o 
< 


>> 


<13 

fl 

fl 

1-9 




bi 

fl 
< 


W2 


O 


> 

o 


o 

03 
P 


11 


17 


3 


11 


4 


10 


14 


25 


15 


8 


16 


8 




1 


1 






1 


6 


3 


2 


1 


1 






1 


1 










1 




1 






1 
























3 


2 






2 

2 
1 


1 


2 
1 

2 


2 
2 


1 
1 


1 


2 
1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


4 




2 




15 


~22 


6 


12 


"To 


12 


~26 


~34 


23 


11 


22 


9 



142 

16 

4 

1 

17 

1 

3 

1 

5 

12 

202 



RECORD OF ARRESTS AGAINST THE PROPERTY, 1925 



Offence 


1-5 

4 

2 

16 

2 
2 

26 


1 

5 

11 
1 

18 


u 

g_ 

8 

22 

2 

3 

3 
38 


6 

1 

11 

3 

4 
25 


£_ 

6 
1 

9 
1 

11 

~28 


0> 

fl 
>-9 

6 

3 

14 

1 
1 

2 
27 


fl 

1-9 

5 

3 

11 
1 

1 

2 

5 
~~28 


bo 

fl 

10 

27 

1 

4 
3 

8 
~53 


ft 
m 

1 
1 

12 

1 

2 

7 
~24 


o 

O 

2 

21 

1 

1 

3 

1 
1 

30 


> 

o 

10 

1 
16 

1 

5 
~33 


P 

6 

1 

11 

1 

1 

3 
23 


*c3 
o 

h 


Breaking and entering .... 
Breaking and entering, att. 

Fraud 


8 
63 
6 
5 
1 
181 
6 
3 


Larceny 

Larceny, Attempted 

Larceny, Sus 


Malicious Mischief 

Receiving stolen property . . 
Riding freight 


5 
11 

17 


Sale of mortgaged property 
Sus. Breaking and entering 
Trespass 


4 
1 

42 


TOTAL 


353 







DISTRIBUTION OF OFFENCES ACCORDING TO NATIONAMTD3S, 1925 



United States . . . 

England 

Ireland 

Scotland 

British Provinces 

Greece 

Russia 

Turkish Empire . 

Poles 

Lithuanians 

Armenians 

Syrians 

Miscellaneous . . . 

TOTAL 



142 

6 

11 

1 

28 

7 



29 



247 



19.1 
10 

33 

4 

41 

20 

6 

34 
9 
4 



373 



234 
15 
32 

3 
40 

8 
11 

1 
40 

9 

11 
29 

1-33 



a 
*±_ 

210 
10 
32 
1 
42 
11 



36 
12 

2 
11 

373 



253 

16 

29 

2 

54 

14 

3 

1 

23 

11 

2 
13 

421 




d 

^2 

262 
11 
35 
4 
54 
12 
6 

17 
7 



11 



422 



d 

>-? 

324 
14 
42 

8 
46 

6 
10 

1 
34 
11 

2 

2 
15 

515 



CD 

w_ 

248 
15 
38 

2 
44 
24 

6 

1 
23 

7 

1 

30 



613 439 



232 
8 

27 
1 

47 

18 
7 
1 

18 
7 
1 
3 

14 



210 

6 

32 

3 

52 

15 



172 

3 

21 

2 

38 



310 



h 



2861 
126 
372 

33 
557 
162 

83 

7 

362 

104 

12 

29 
211 



4919 



DISTRIBUTION OFFENCES ACCORDING TO TRADES and PROFESSIONS 



Building Trades . . 
Mechanical Trades 
Mill and Factory . . 
Shops and Stores . 

Professional 

Agricultural 

Clothing and G-arb 

Agents 

Laborers 

Service, Domestic . 
Transportation . . . 

Children 

Soldiers 

Sailors 

Miscellaneous 
None 



























13 


































CD 

Pi 

1-5 














o 


d 

c<3 

1-5 


CD 




t-l 

a 

< 


>> 


>> 


d 
< 


a 

CD 
CO 


CD 

O 


> 

o 


CD 
CD 
Q 


h 


22 


23 


34 


38 


42 


23 


53 


54 


39 


29 


26 


29 


412 


18 


33 


34 


38 


30 


35 


31 


49 


26 


28 


22 


16 


360 


45 


81 


91 


64 


71 


73 


93 


92 


63 


74 


86 


65 


898 


50 


58 


57 


43 


52 


62 


67 


84 


51 


38 


47 


44 


653 


2 


2 


1 


4 


5 


5 


5 


5 


11 


2 


3 


1 


46 


4 


6 


15 


10 


6 


11 


5 


14 


8 


8 


7 


3 


97 


2 


3 




2 


1 








2 




1 




11 


4 


14 


13 


14 


16 


17 


16 


11 


9 


12 


10 


7 


143 


67 


89 


102 


108 


123 


126 


140 


196 


130 


127 


103 


79 


1390 


19 


29 


29 


19 


23 


19 


35 


41 


48 


28 


24 


31 


345 


10 


23 34 


22 


12 


25 


40 


44 


27 


26 


35 


18 


316 


2 


12 15 


9 


40 


12 


22 


9 


4 


10 


18 


11 


164 






1 




8 


7 


6 


11 


1 


3 


3 


40 




2 


1 




2 




2 


6 






1 


14 


2 


3 






3 


1 




4 


1 


4 


2 


20 


247 


1 3 
373 433 


373 


421 


1 

422 


515 


6 

613 


439 


384 


389 




10 


310 


4 919 





d 

a 

1-5 


CD 


j-1 


u 

a 




CD 

a 

•-5 




be 


a 

■2) 

CO 


O 


o 


6 

CD 
P 


C3 
O 

h 






315 
10 
48 

373 


365 

23 
45 

433 


332 
16 

25 

373 


341 
17 
63 


355 
15 
52 


406 

27 

82| 


479 
31 

103 


364 
24 
51 


307 
18 
59 


311 
27 
51 


242 
26 
42 


4018 
250 
651 




30 


TOTAL 


421 


422 


515! 


613(439 


384 


389 


310 


4919 



DIVISIONAL REPORT 

OF THE. 

LOWLLL POLICE DLPARTMLNT 

JANUARY |, 1925 TO DECEMBER 31, 1925 







dOOHH 


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REPORT OF CRIMINAL IRUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 













Autos 












Unre- 




Re- 


Month 


Arrests 


Lost and Stolen 


Recovered 


covered 


Stolen covered 


January 


19 


$1,352.40 


$ 811.44 ■ 


$ 540.96 


4 


4 


February 


17 


1,505.98 


978.25 


527.73 


4 


2 


March 


19 


6,273.45 


4,704.75 


1,568.70 


1 


1 


April 


11 


2,746.75 


2,196.80 


549.95 


2 


1 


May 


9 


873.67 


523.80 


349.87 


5 


5 


June 


10 


980.84 


666.40 


314.44 


6 


4 


July 


11 


761.25 


456.60 


304.65 


5 


4 


August 


17 


1,252.71 


826.36 


426.35 


11 


11 


September 


16 


1,999.67 


1,379.31 


620.36 


11 


10 


October 


20 


2,177.75 


1,291.65 


886.10 


4 


4 


November 


14 


2,013.85 


946.11 


1,067.74 


11 


9 


December 


13 


923.50 


378.43 


545.07 


10 


9 


Total 


176 


$22,861.82 


$15,159.90 


$7,701.92 


74 


64 



PROPERTY RECOVERED FOR OTHER CITIES AND TOWNS 

Boston, Mass $650.00 

Cambridge, Mass 825.00 

Fitchburg, Mass 55.00 

Groton, Mass 75.00 

Lawrence, Mass 850.00 

Peabody, Mass 1,200.00 

Roxbury, Mass 1,200.00 

Woburn, Mass 1,800.00 

Worcester, Mass 800.00 

Lewiston, Me 1,500.00 

Claremont, N. H 425.00 

Lebanon, N. H 400.00 

Warren, Penn 500.00 

Total $10,280.00 



PRISONERS ARRESTED FOR OTHER CITIES AND TOWNS 



Abington, Mass. 1 

Boston, Mass 1 

Concord, Mass 1 

Fall River, Mass 1 

Lawrence, Mass 4 

Lynn, Mass 2 

Methuen, Mass 2 

New Bedford, Mass 1 

Peabody, Mass 1 



Salem, Mass l 

Springfield, Mass 1 

Woburn, Mass 2 

Manchester, N. H 2 

New London, Conn 1 

Lewiston, Me 1 

Albany, N. Y 1 

White Plains, N. Y 1 



Respectfully submitted, 

DAVID PETRIE, 

Captain of Police. 



POLICEWOMEN'S REPORT— 1925 

New girls during the year 334 

Age 18 and under 

Representing 10 nationalities. 

Unhappy homes in care of the office 326 

Instrumental of arresting 106 

Court cases 135 

District court 108 Superior court 12 Probate court 15 

Unmarried mothers aided 29 

Girls placed in homes and institutions 138 

Girls taken to physicians and hospitals 113 

Calls and callers 5736 

Conferences'^ 400 

Emily M. Skilton, 

Police Woman. 

POLICE SIGNAL SYSTEM, 1925 



Months 

January . . . . 
February . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . 
October . . . . 
November . . 
December . . 

TOTALS . 



Duty Calls 



Telephone 



Wagon 



Prisoners 



Miles 



39,300 
34,349 
37,879 
34,763 
35,296 
35,576 
36,757 
35,283 
35,425 
35,225 
35,024 
37,577 



3,545 
3,295 
3,564 
3,201 
3,586 
3,989 
3,712 
3,436 

3,556 
3,654 
3,511 
3,698 



102 
155 
154 
166 
172 
166 
190 
171 
141 
135 
138 
122 



111 
191 
195 
200 
183 
194 
219 
204 
207 
175 
182 
138 



122 
188 

189 
208 
225 
210 
219 
253 
175 
167 
171 
151 



432,454 



42,737 



1,812 



2,199 



2,278 



REPORT OF LIQUOR OFFICERS— 1925 

No. of liquor cases in district court 399 

Amount of fines paid in district court $27,500 

13 persons sent to house of correction with a total of 

twenty months. 
42 found not guilty in district court. 
6 defaulted. 

1 case suspended. 

3 died before being tried. 
3 cases filed. 

2 placed on probation 

SUPERIOR COURT 
61 cases appealed to superior court. 

Fines paid in superior court $4,075.00 

15 persons found not guilty. 

29 persons sent to H. of C. with a total of 44 months. 

1 case filed. 

5 cases pending. 

Restpectfully submitted, 

GEORGE B. PALMER, 

Capt. of Police.